Elderly Man Threatens to Pull Gun on Texas Medics

first_imgAround midnight Sunday, EMS was called to an apartment complex at the 10000 block of Sahara to help Rodney Ray, 53. After checking Ray out, the paramedics told him his oxygen levels were low, and they said he needed to go to the hospital for further medical assistance. But according to police, Ray became upset and refused to go to the hospital. While paramedics argued their case, Ray threatened to pull out a pistol. Read More, Elderly man being helped by EMS team threatens to pull gun on paramedics When an elderly man being helped by paramedics was told he needed to go to the hospital, the man disagreed. center_img Then, police say, he threatened to pull a gun on the EMTs. last_img

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COR discusses student safety

first_imgIn the wake of the party busts, student arrests and alcohol-related citations that marked the 2010-11 school year, the Council of Representatives (COR) kicked off its first fall meeting with an update on student safety Tuesday. “We’re really trying to be deliberate in the first thing we address by making sure all our bases are covered with student safety,” student body president Pat McCormick said. Though the first weekend of the fall has historically seen a spike in police-related incidents, student body vice president Brett Rocheleau was pleased to inform the group that no student arrests had yet occurred. “It’s great news coming from last year, when at this time we had nearly 80 arrests,” he said. “Now, we have zero to date.” Drawing statistics from a story in Monday’s South Bend Tribune, chief of staff Claire Sokas reported only two student citations from a total of 56 given in the area this weekend. The drop in citations may be due in part to a recent police policy change outlined in an Aug. 11 email to students from student government. The email stated police “will exercise discretion in addressing complaints regarding student gatherings … If there are no outward signs of underage drinking, public urination, extreme littering, traffic obstructions or disrespect, the dispatched officers will most likely issue a warning to the house instead of immediately issuing citations and/or making arrests.” Rocheleau discussed two reported incidents of student parties attracting police attention this week. He said the officers acted in accordance with the new policy. “They did exactly what they said they’d do. They got the first [noise disturbance] call, came by and told [the residents] to quiet down. They didn’t get a second call, so they didn’t come back,” he said. “The second party was out of control, so they didn’t give a warning, but they didn’t make any arrests, they just gave a noise citation.” While the policy of discretion may relieve some students, Sokas emphasized the warnings will only be offered once to each house, not for each party. “Some people are under the impression the warnings are good for the entire year,” she said. “The way we’ve been interpreting this is that it’s for the first call to the house of the year, that it’s a warning.” Rocheleau reminded members that the discretionary nature of the policy leaves no clear standards as far as which parties get warned and which get busted. “It’s slightly vague in that they said they can break up the party on first call or they can give a warning,” he said. “It’s completely at their discretion.” McCormick also specified that the policy is limited to the South Bend Police Department (SBPD), and students should not expect similar warnings before receiving citations at tailgates and other events. “This procedure has been put in place by SBPD, and the [Saint Joseph] County and [Indiana State] Excise Police have not guaranteed they’ll follow it,” he said. “For game days, [excise police] will be on campus.” Beyond negotiations with local law enforcement, McCormick said he hopes to increase student safety through educational events such as the Student Safety Summit, which takes place today at 6 p.m. on the Irish Green. Area police agencies will offer presentations, followed by a question-and-answer session. “We’ve changed the location so it’s more accessible,” he said. “We hope this is another way for us to facilitate communication.” Regardless of how informed students are about drinking laws, police policies and off-campus safety tips, Sokas said students choosing to drink underage can never count on law enforcement being lenient or issuing a warning. “It’s a privilege and not a right,” she said.last_img read more

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Activist highlights climate change

first_imgFormer Iowa Lawmaker and climate activist Ed Fallon visited Saint Mary’s on Friday to discuss his journey from Los Angeles to Washington D.C. and how it impacted him and Americans he met along the way.Fallon spent March 1 to Nov. 1, 2014, on a 3,000 mile walk from California to Washington, leading 35 climate activists. In his presentation, Fallon introduced the audience to a fellow marcher, described the climate crisis and offered suggestions for more sustainable lifestyles in the “New Climate Era.”During the march, the group not only walked and talked about climate change, but they also personally experienced changes throughout their trip, Fallon said.Fallon said on the very first night of the trip, the group was unable to camp in a church’s parking lot because there had been a large amount of rain. The church then allowed the travelers to stay inside.Fallon said the unexpected kindness shown by the church and the amount of rain California had produced that day were two inspiring reasons that led the group to keep walking.“What we’re dealing with is unprecedented,” Fallon said.Fallon also described the devastation and impact of wild fires and how they harm the environment, telling the audience to “take action now” and begin to “change our lives.”Sometimes, the group thought of themselves as the “Paul Reveres of Climate Crisis” after making this journey and sharing their knowledge, Fallon said.The walkers journeyed through California, Colorado, Nebraska and eventually, they made it to the White House, he said. While some of the marchers only joined for bits and pieces of the trek, Fallon walked the entire route with the help of a walking stick made at a monastery.“It was an amazing experience, and I don’t know how we did it,” Fallon said.Fallon said he was able to break through the political orientation of those he met throughout the country, as most could see the importance of climate change and our need to take action now.When asked by a student how she could get involved on campus to take climate action, Fallon said leadership opportunities can help, but it is best to start with everyday things.This event was part of the Saint Mary’s Justice Fridays series, sponsored by Justice Education, the department of political science, environmental studies and the Office of Civic and Social Engagement (OCSE).Tags: climate activism, climate activist, Climate change, ed fallon, iowa lawkmaker, Justice Education, Justice Friday, new climate eralast_img read more

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Beaumont woman facing federal gun charges

first_imgBEAUMONT — United States Attorney John Ratcliffe announced Thursday that a 46-year-old Beaumont woman has been indicted by a federal grand jury and charged with being a Felon in Possession of a Firearm in the Eastern District of Texas. Donna Lynn Baine was charged with possessing multiple firearms and explosive devices after being previously convicted of two felony drug offenses in 2006. According to court documents, a search warrant was executed on Aug. 7, at Baine’s residence during which officers recovered 35 firearms, several explosive devices and numerous rounds of ammunition. If convicted, Baine faces up to 10 years in federal prison and a fine not to exceed $250,000. This case is being investigated by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives and is being prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Michelle Englade. A grand jury indictment is not evidence of guilt. All defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.last_img read more

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New Fondriest SF2 Lugged Steel Road Bike

first_imgFondriest has a new modern-retro take on road bikes with their SF2 steel lugged frame. Each one is handmade in Italy, and the attention to detail is up there. Here’s the fluffy, pretty description from their U.S. rep:The meticulously finished, gorgeous pearl-white and chrome lugged steel machine turned heads throughout the week.  Made 100 percent  in Italy, the SF2 harkens back to cycling’s earlier days, when brazed, lugged construction was de rigueur. The SF2 is made from Columbus tubing and features marvelous detail work. As “hand-built” bikes continue to gain popularity in the U.S., the SF2 demonstrates that Fondriest can match the best of them.Make the jump for detail pics, they’re quite attractive… Frame, fork, headset and seatpost will retail for $2,200 USD.last_img

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IWDC makes organisational changes

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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USACE looking for comments on Oregon LNG funding

first_imgThe Portland District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is seeking public comment on its plan to accept funds from Clatsop Diking Improvement Company on behalf of Oregon LNG.The Portland District will review Oregon LNG’s proposed request to modify federally constructed flood risk reduction projects, to include horizontal directional drilling, auger boring, or over-crossing operations across such projects; and review potential effects to the Columbia River Federal Navigation Channel of horizontal directional drilling and dredging to create a ship turning basin, USACE said in a statement.The Corps may accept and expend these funds pursuant to Section 214 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2000, as amended, which provides that the Secretary of the Army, after public notice, may accept and expend funds contributed by a non-federal public entity to expedite the evaluation of a permit of that entity related to a project or activity for a public purpose under the jurisdiction of the Department of the Army. In doing so, the Secretary must ensure that the use of such funds will not impact impartial decision making with respect to permits, either substantively or procedurally.[mappress mapid=”16828″]Image: Oregon LNGlast_img read more

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TSHD Sommers Arrives in Astrakhan

first_imgRecently delivered the 1000 m³ trailing suction hopper dredger Sommers has arrived at the FSUE Rosmorport Astrakhan branch and is ready for its first job.The Sommers arrived in Astrakhan on June 21st following a five-day voyage from the Krasnoye Sormovo shipyard.The newbuild comes as the lead vessel in a series of three 1000 m³ TSHDs that are being built for Rosmorport.Damen Shipyards Gorinchem, the Netherlands, designed all three vessels with the working design documentation provided by Volga-Caspian Design Bureau (MNP Group), Russia.The new vessel will stay in the waters of the Volga-Caspian sea shipping channel (VKMSK), performing dredging operations along the waterway until the completion of the summer navigation season.Delivery of the other two dredgers, Kronshlot and Kadosh, is expected to take place before the end of 2016.last_img read more

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Fate of Quinn Insurance hangs in the balance

first_imgMore than 2,900 law firms and sole practitioners could be left without professional indemnity insurance (PII) on Monday when the Irish High Court decides the fate of Quinn Insurance, the Irish insurance company that was forced into administration last week. Quinn covers around 10% of the solicitors’ PII insurance market. The Irish Financial Regulator, which regulates Quinn Insurance, has petitioned the court to appoint a permanent administrator to Quinn Insurance. If the court accepts the Financial Regulator’s arguments, solicitors holding Quinn policies will almost certainly have to buy new policies with other insurers, or enter the assigned risks pool (ARP), within four weeks The Irish High Court placed Quinn Insurance in provisional administration on 30 March following a petition by the Financial Regulator. Administrator Grant Thornton is understood to be delivering a financial report on Quinn Insurance to the regulator today, which will be presented in court on Monday. The Solicitors Regulation Authority has advised firms with Quinn policies to sit tight pending the outcome of Monday’s hearing. It is understood that Grant Thornton has told the SRA that Quinn has sufficient financial reserves to pay claims on PII policies, but an SRA spokesman could not confirm this. Martin Ellis, head of the solicitors’ practice group at broker Prime Professions, which provides 1,900 sole practitioners with Quinn PII policies, said: ‘If a new policy has to be put in place, then insurers aren’t going to do it for nothing.’ However, he predicted that policies would be allowed to run until 30 September regardless of the outcome of Monday’s hearing. A spokeswoman for PYV, another major Quinn broker, said that PYV is advising clients in line with the guidance of the Financial Regulator and SRA. ‘As an independent broker, we are not tied to any one insurer,’ she said. An SRA spokesman said that Quinn policyholders could be given a time extension to find alternative policies if necessary. Grant Thornton and the Financial Regulator have been analysing financial guarantees, estimated to be worth €448m (£394m) altogether, set up by subsidiaries of Quinn Insurance. The guarantees are alleged to have been used inappropriately to set off debts from other companies that make up the Quinn group conglomerate. Quinn Insurance said last week that the guarantees were fully disclosed in the accounts of its 24 subsidiaries, but the Irish Independent claimed this week that the existence of the guarantees was disclosed in the published accounts of just one Quinn Insurance subsidiary, Quinn Logistics, with no indication of their value. Quinn said this week that the guarantees were contained in the filed accounts of eight Quinn Insurance subsidiaries, to which the Financial Regulator has full access, and that the guarantees are worth less than €448m. Solicitors’ rules state that law firms must find alternative cover or apply to enter the ARP within four weeks if an insurer has provisional administrators appointed. However, the SRA said that the concept of ‘provisional administration’ as determined by the Irish High Court in the Quinn case falls outside the definition in its rules. Meanwhile, SRA figures show that £33m worth of claims are currently filed against law firms in the ARP, the insurer of last resort for firms unable to obtain PII on the open market. Some £5.5m is due in premiums from ARP firms, but just £2m has been paid to date.last_img read more

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