Plant diversity, altitude leave collectors breathless in China

first_imgHarvard researcher Dave Boufford offered a strange description of a plant, even one whose bulky, knobby flower proved partly resistant to the pressing and drying process through which botanical samples routinely go.“They look like little animals sitting on rocks,” he said.Boufford, a senior research scientist, was standing on the fourth floor of the Harvard Herbaria, between the rows of tall green metal cabinets that hold the Herbaria’s collections, famed for their extensive representation of Asian plants.Moments earlier, he had opened a cabinet midway down the aisle in the nearly deserted stacks and had begun pulling out folders filled with specimens from a remote region of China, hard by the Tibetan border.In the folders were a greenhouse plant with nearly translucent leaves that cover its flowers, creating a warm oasis in the high-altitude chill for pollinating insects; the starfish-like Saussurea stella, whose purple-tinged leaves lie close to the ground; and its relative, Saussurea medusa, much larger and coated with furry-looking fine hairs, which prompted Boufford’s double take when he encountered it in the field.“Why is it so hairy? Some thought it was to keep the plant warm, but right next door are plants without hairs,” Boufford said.This minor mystery is just one of many that remain unanswered in the place these plants call home: the remote Hengduan Mountains of China.A dramatic, high-altitude region of breathtaking views, steep valleys, and incredible biodiversity, the Hengduan Mountains are part of a larger area considered a global biodiversity hotspot. The nonprofit group Conservation International calls the mountains of southwest China the most biodiverse temperate region in the world, home of the giant panda, the golden monkey, and 3,500 endemic plant species.It is the plants that draw Harvard’s Boufford, who began collecting in the region in the mid-1990s. In 1998, Boufford, the Arnold Arboretum, and the Harvard University Herbaria struck up a research collaboration with several Chinese institutions, including the Kunming Institute of Botany and the Institute of Botany in Beijing. The partnership has proven beneficial to both sides. The National Science Foundation and Harvard provide funding, which is often scarce for such purposes in China, while Chinese scholars provide access to parts of the country to which Westerners may have difficulty obtaining travel permission. The financial investment has helped bring in additional dollars, prompting matching funds from the Chinese National Natural Science Foundation.“It’s worked out very well,” Boufford said. “It’s just a fantastic area. There’s always the chance of discovering new things.”Together, the project’s Chinese and American scientists have collected between 120,000 and 150,000 specimens representing 6,000 species. Over the project’s course, they’ve identified 30 new species of plants and fungi and created an online database of images and descriptions useful for scholars around the world. One of their goals is to define the hotspot’s boundaries, by finding places where biodiversity drops fairly quickly. Boufford said some of the diversity may be tied to rainfall, since they have observed what he described as “fingers of diversity” running with the rain patterns up mountain valleys.As a companion effort, Susan Kelley, the project’s longtime manager who last spring moved to the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, has created an online gazetteer of Chinese place names. Boufford said the gazetteer is a critical resource in figuring out where past specimens were collected, in a time before global positioning systems and in a region where international researchers have transliterated names differently over decades of collecting.Once gathered and processed, the specimens not only augment collections at Harvard and the host Chinese institutions, but are shared with researchers around the world in a collaborative exchange that trades specimens for expert help identifying them.Zhu L. Yang, a mycologist at the Kunming Institute and a collaborator of Boufford’s since the late 1990s, said the expeditions bolster collections gathered from the region in the 1970s and ’80s, which in some cases were poorly preserved and are unsuitable for modern scientific study.“Working conditions were very hard and the equipment for drying specimens very simple and poor — they usually dried specimens with fire directly in the field,” Yang said. “Consequently, the specimens were in most cases poorly preserved and can’t serve as materials for current scientific studies. Through conduct of this project, we can go to many distant and inaccessible places to collect specimens. This is especially important for current molecular biological investigations. If you have no specimens of high quality, you can’t get reliable scientific data.”Boufford and colleagues are following up on the Chinese travels of Joseph Rock, a botanist who collected in the region for decades in the early 20th century. Rock worked for several scientific institutions, including Harvard’s Arnold Arboretum, for which he collected 20,000 specimens in 1924.The project has recently shifted its Harvard home. After being based at the Arnold Arboretum for more than a decade, in July the project, along with Boufford, moved over to the Harvard University Herbaria.Boufford has focused his efforts on the interior of the Hengduan Mountains because Rock collected from their periphery. The area’s biodiversity is even more remarkable, Boufford said, because its elevation is so high. The region they collect from averages 14,000 feet, with a growing season of just three months.The mountains are the birthplace of several of Asia’s principal rivers, including the Yangtze, which flows through China; the Mekong and the Salween, which flow through several countries in Southeast Asia; and the rivers that join to form Burma’s Irrawaddy. The result, Boufford said, is terrain that is quite variable. The upper Yangtze, for example, flows through a gorge at 6,000 feet between mountains that tower to more than 18,000 feet.The result is a profusion of environmental conditions in a very small area. The terrain in low canyons can be almost desertlike, with naturalized cacti from the Americas, while other areas hold rich forests, expansive meadows, and, above tree line, squat plants characteristic of alpine areas.A field season lasts roughly two months and requires more months in the laboratory to process and identify the specimens. Richard Ree, assistant curator of botany at the Field Museum in Chicago, wrote his doctoral dissertation about specimens gathered while working with Boufford. Ree, who received his doctorate from Harvard in 2001, participated in several field seasons from 1997 to 2000, and then continued to collaborate with Boufford after graduating, right through last summer’s trip.Ree, Boufford, and Kelley described field conditions that have varied widely over time. Initially, the roads were in such poor shape — with 1,000-foot drop-offs — that Boufford was certain someone would eventually die on them. They’ve improved considerably since, however, as the Chinese government seeks to open Tibet to tourism and settlement by Han Chinese. A trip that used to take seven or eight hours can now be done in just an hour and a half, they said.Along with the travel improvements, however, have come more people, with the accompanying need to lodge and feed them, meaning more yaks and goats grazing, and more searchers collecting plants for medicinal purposes.“It’s quite remote,” Kelley said. “Yet, at the same time, just when you think you’ve stepped on ground nobody ever stepped on before, there’s a Tibetan.”Sleeping conditions have also varied widely on the collecting trips, from tents and sleeping bags in the field to more comfortable accommodations at new hotels.The group of American and Chinese colleagues generally gets moving early in the day. Researchers pile into several cars that head in different directions. Once they reach their destinations, the collectors hike in various directions, gathering several specimens of each type of plant they find before rejoining colleagues at the car at day’s end. In their travels, researchers have to be prepared for mountain weather, which can be warm enough for shirtsleeves, and cool enough for pounding hail a short time later.The trips have fostered friendships and professional respect among researchers in the two nations. Yang has visited Harvard three times to examine the fungal collections, books, journals, and papers at the Farlow Herbarium. He also has sent his doctoral students here twice and has fielded requests from American mycologists for materials from the Hengduan Mountains.The main collaborator for vascular plants, Professor Hang Sun, and six of his students have also visited Harvard to study the Herbaria’s rich collections of Asian specimens and literature. Nine students from China have earned doctoral degrees through their direct involvement in the project.For the researchers, the payback is not just the incremental advance of scientific knowledge and the relationship building among scientists of two nations, it is also the personal experience of working in one of the world’s most beautiful places. Kelley described the terrain as “dream geography” and Ree and Boufford said the mere act of lifting one’s eyes is rewarded with awe-inspiring views of snow-capped peaks and glaciers.“It really is a dramatic, breathtaking landscape,” Ree said. “You don’t ever get used to it.”last_img read more

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Lawyer pilot: Puppy mission accomplished

first_img FLORIDA LAWYER LARRY PLOUCHA helped rescue Labrador puppies with Pilots N Paws. April 1, 2013 Jan Pudlow Senior Editor Regular News Lawyer pilot: Puppy mission accomplishedcenter_img Lawyer pilot: Puppy mission accomplished Senior EditorFt. Lauderdale lawyer Larry Ploucha’s longtime passion to fly has taken on a warm, fuzzy, face-licking new purpose.Folding down the back seat of his four-seater Mooney airplane, he made room to hold a litter of four Labrador retriever puppies (the fifth one was so cute it got adopted by a flying buddy before he made it out of the airport).The eight-week-old pups needed to be flown from Miami to Tampa in order to save their lives and find adoptive homes, all coordinated through a nonprofit organization called Pilots N Paws.“The thought of them getting the needle does not sit well,” says Ploucha, a self-described cat man who loves all animals.Piloting the plane with his good friend Lloyd Zand, a retired radiologist, Ploucha looked back at his precious cargo with floppy ears and big brown eyes, and said the droning of the engine stopped their whining, and they settled in for the ride of their lives.The puppy mission was transporting them from the Kendall Tamiami Executive Airport in Southwest Miami to the Tampa Executive Airport.“The arrangements were well coordinated. We offloaded the puppies and were on our way,” Ploucha said.It was Zand who first got Ploucha involved in Pilots N Paws about two years ago, a South Carolina-based nonprofit organization founded in 2008 to help transport animals to no-kill shelters that otherwise would be euthanized. Pilotsnpaws.org, the organization’s website, is how 3,168 pilot volunteers coordinate where their flying services are needed to move dogs, cats, and even pigs, reptiles, and rabbits.Happy endings are plentiful.There’s the story about Radar, a pit bull left for dead on the side of the road in Philadelphia and believed to have been forced into dog fighting, flown to Cleveland for rehabilitation.Another account details how a deaf puppy was flown from Midland, Texas, to a special rescue facility for animals with special needs in Katy, Texas, where the dog is learning sign language.As Ploucha describes, there are special mass movements a couple of times a year, such as when pilots flew in from all over to Charleston, S.C., and helped transport 300 dogs.“One case was a shelter that had gotten a bad reputation because it was not killing animals in a humane fashion. The goal is to get them into foster homes or in no-kill shelters,” Ploucha said.Ploucha earns his paycheck at Fowler White Boggs in Ft. Lauderdale helping clients with tax law, estate planning, employee benefits, and other business issues.When it’s time for fun, Ploucha says his favorite way of “disposing of hard-earned cash” is climbing into his plane and seeing the world from the sky.“It gives me a sense of freedom in all three dimensions,” Ploucha describes.“I have the ability to see the world from a slightly different perspective and realize how pretty things are: the water, the Keys, the Everglades, the cities. It’s a constantly changing perspective.”Ploucha has had his pilot’s license since he was 18, is a licensed aircraft mechanic, loves to restore World War II aircraft, and is co-founder of the Wings Over Miami Air Museum.Instead of golfing on the weekends, Ploucha said he and Zand love to head to the airport for a day of flying, eating at the airport of their destination, and then flying home the same day.Now, Pilots N Paws “gives some purpose to the flying that we otherwise would be doing for fun,” Ploucha said.It will really make his day, he said, when he gets the chance to take flight with a rescued cat.last_img read more

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Covid-19 has ‘significantly reduced’ value of criminal legal aid offer

first_imgThe government must do more than it has proposed to save the criminal legal aid market from collapse, the Law Society has said.The Ministry of Justice is currently reviewing criminal legal aid fees and unveiled the first tranche of proposals in February. The Society said at the time that the £50m offer was woefully inadequate. It now says the landscape has changed dramatically because of the coronavirus and the February package is unlikely to provide anything close to what is necessary to save firms from unrecoverable financial difficulties.Since lockdown measures were imposed, the Society says the number of arrests and cases going through the courts has plummeted. The backlog of outstanding cases has risen dramatically. Crime firms have reported up to an 80% drop in income. The Society says: ‘The delay in implementing the proposals has meant the need for interim relief has now become more urgent than ever. In particular, if firms are now going to have to go significantly further into debt in order to survive the current crisis, they need some assurance that they will have a means of repaying this debt when we emerge from it.’Criminal solicitors have told the Society that they will have to repay government loans and, as more courts reopen, bring staff out of furlough to deal with an increased workload. ‘This will mean finding sufficient funds to pay staff wages at a time when their finances are severely challenged. Some firms tell us that in fact they see themselves heading into difficulties much further down the line. Where a firm has just been paid for a large case undertaken prior to the pandemic they may have sufficient funds to see them through until 2021. However, it is at that stage that they will start to have problems.’The Society adds that the number of criminal legal aid firms is continuing to fall. In 2010, there were 1,861 firms doing criminal legal aid. This figure dropped to 1,271 last year and currently stands at 1,147. The Society says more will follow. The government is asked to urgently reverse an 8.75% fee cut imposed in 2014. The Society again submits that there is no logical reason for 100% of the cracked trial fee to be paid to the advocate in a case, and not the litigator. There should be a fee uplift for youth court work and dealing with vulnerable clients as solicitors require additional time for this work. Payments on account should be allowed for approved disbursements in appeals and review cases.Society president Simon Davis said: ‘We have made clear since the start of the pandemic that criminal legal aid firms are facing a triple whammy – immediate cashflow problems, short to medium term permanent loss of income and the pre-existing crisis of sustainability. Unless the government addresses all three, there is a serious risk of widespread market collapse.’last_img read more

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World rail freight news round-up

first_imgAfter returning to Earth at the Siziwang landing ground in Inner Mongolia following 33 days in orbit, the Shenzhou 11 re-entry capsule from China’s sixth manned space mission was transported to Beijing on a China Railway Corp flat wagon with special brackets.G3 Global Holdings has appointed Peter Kiewit Infrastructure to design and build a high capacity grain export terminal at the Port of Vancouver for opening in 2020. This will include a rail loop capable of holding three 134-wagon trains which will be unloaded while moving. ‘Our Vancouver terminal is central to G3’s vision of a coast-to-coast grain handling network that sets a new standard in efficiency’, said G3 CEO Karl Gerrand. ‘We plan to transform the movement of grain through the west coast, providing Canadian farmers with competitive pricing and reliable delivery opportunities.’OT Logistics has finalised the purchase of 100% of Polish freight operator STK for 35·5m złoty and 80% of Kolej Bałtycka for 3·4m złoty.The International Union of Wagon Keepers and International Union for Road-Rail Combined Transport are among the 21 associations representing various freight modes which have established the Industry Alliance for Multimodal Connectivity & Logistics for Growth to provide industry input to EU decision-makers, TEN-T corridor co-ordinators and relevant EU agencies. ‘I AM Connectivity & Logistics for Growth will facilitate important dialogue with EU institutions on the current and future policy framework‘, according to Nik Delmeire, Secretary General of the European Shippers’ Council.The route to the Port of Vlissingen in the Netherlands has been designated as a principal line of the Rhine-Alpine freight corridor.Indian Railways is undertaking trials carrying reduced-height double-stacked containers by rail.The EU’s INEA agency is providing PKP Cargo subsidiary Advanced World Transport with €5·9m to cover two-thirds of the cost of modernising the Ostrava Paskov intermodal terminal. The three 270 m tracks will be lengthened to 700 m, increasing capacity from 2400 TEU containers at once to 5000 TEU.last_img read more

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Gene-modified cow makes milk rich in protein

first_imgScientists have altered the genes of a dairy cow to produce milk that’s rich in a protein used in numerous food products and lacking in a component that causes allergies in humans.Using a process called RNA-interference that turns certain genes on or off, scientists from New Zealand produced a cow whose milk had increased casein, a protein used to make cheese and other foods, and almost no beta-lactoglobulin, a component in milk whey protein that causes allergies.advertisementadvertisement Ordinarily, the proportion of whey to casein in the milk from dairy cows is 21-to-79, according to the paper. The milk from the genetically altered cow had a ratio of 4-to-96, according to a paper. That’s probably due to a 96 percent reduction in beta-lactoglobulin, or BGL, the paper said.The study can be seen as a proof-of-concept that tinkering with nutritional content genetically is possible, said William Hallman, director of the food policy institute at Rutgers University.More testing will be needed to determine the milk’s full dietary content, and scientists must consider the effects of breeding gene-altered animals, he said. The field has been controversial because of safety and environmental concerns.The female calf was also born without a tail, according to the report in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.Tests now need to be done to see whether removing BLG really does help those with allergies and whether the genetic change harms the animal, according to the paper, written by researchers from New Zealand’s AgResearch, a government-owned research institute, and the University of Waikato, both based in Hamilton, New Zealand. PD—From Bloomberg Businessweek (Click here to read the full article.)advertisementlast_img read more

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Iditarod Dog With Signs Of Pneumonia Dies

first_imgThe cause of death last year for Keith’s dog Flash, a 4-year-old male, was consistent with acute aspiration pneumonia. Race marshal Mark Nordman said Thursday that every dog death “is investigated to the fullest” and the review of Blonde’s death will remain open pending the necropsy results. “It is very unfortunate that Katherine has been through this before, but once again, I can find no fault in the way that Katherine cares for her race team,” Nordman said in a statement. However, Nordman said Keith will be allowed to continue racing because there was no evidence of a lack of care. “Mushers are using and abusing dogs and then leaving broken ones behind in their pursuit of the almighty purse,” PETA Executive Vice President Tracy Reiman said in a statement. Five canine deaths connected to the nearly 1,000-mile (1,609 kilometer) race across Alaska last year prompted protests from animal rights activists complaining that dogs are forced to run a hundred miles (160 kilometers) a day. FacebookTwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Alaska musher Katherine Keith has had dogs die in the last two Iditarod Trail Sled Dog races, but a race official said he could find no fault in how she cares for her team. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals on Thursday said Blonde’s death pinpoints why the Iditarod must end. It also has called for the Iditarod to release veterinary records of every dog dropped from this year’s race. A release from the race said the 5-year-old dog named Blonde had been dropped from the competition Wednesday and was being treated for signs of pneumonia. Blonde died early Thursday. A necropsy is planned.last_img read more

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Records aplenty – Jago boys win 11th Central Champs title as Edwin girls better best times on way to 12th title

first_imgSt Jago High School’s boys, now with 11 titles, and Edwin Allen High School’s girls, now with 12, continued their dominance of the Digicel Central Championships which ended at the GC Foster College of Physical Education and Sport yesterday. Yesterday was highlighted by several records on the track with Edwin Allen and Hydel leading the way. However the performance of the day and the Championships came in the relays as the Edwin Allen Class Two quartet of Serena Cole, Tina Clayton, Brandy Hall and Tia Clayton, in that order, was simply brilliant. They had the fair sized crowd in a frenzy as despite several hitches in their baton exchanges they stopped the clock at an unbelievable 43.80s to obliterate the old mark of 45.02s set by St Jago last year. It was the first time a team in the class was going below 44s and it was the second fastest ever time by an Edwin Allen quartet, as only their Penn Relays winning time of 43.62s, done last year, was faster. “I am kind of in shock,” Tia Clayton said after the race. “I knew we could have gone that fast, but didn’t expect it to come today.” Hydel finished second in 45.28s, with Holmwood Technical third in 45.62s. Edwin head coach Michael dyke was not surprised by the fast time done by his quartet. “I knew they had it in them,” he said. “I expected it and they could have gone much faster. I expected around 43.50s, but they had some faulty exchanges. This will be corrected for Gibson McCook Relays next week.” Earlier, Kevona Davis continued her impressive form after producing a record run in winning the Girl’s Class One  200m. Despite a terrible start, Davis was still able to catch her rivals early to win, going away in the end to post a new mark of 23.30s to erase the old mark of 23.56s set by Holmwood Technical’s Michae Harriot two years ago. Holmwood’s Kishawna Wallace, 24.24s, and Jago’s Kayla Bonnick, 24.36s, ended second and third respectively. “I really had a poor start today as I came out of the blocks last and had to play catch up, but I was able to still win easily,” Davis said. “I am looking forward to the Digicel Grand Prix final and Champs, and I am just hoping to remain healthy for the remainder of the season.” Tia Clayton wrote her name in the record books after winning the Class Two Girls 100m in 11.29 seconds, as teammate Hall who had the record for one day, ended second in 11.38s, also inside her old mark of 11.46s. Holmwood’s Sasheika Steele ended third in 11.50 seconds. Among the boys, Clarendon College’s Rajay Morris ruled supreme in the Class One 200m after winning easily in 21.22s, relegating St Jago’s Kavian Kerr to second in 21.66s, with Bridgeport High’s Junior Grant getting third in 21.76s. Earlier, Jago’s Javari Thomas won the Class One Boys 100m after clocking 10.70s to get the better of Manchester High’s Keino Wint, second in 10.73s, and Rasheed Foster of Charlemont was third in 10.80s. Holmwood boys dominated the 400m. In Class One, Bovel McPherson won impressively in 46.77s, ahead of Manchester High Zandrian Barnes 47.48s, and D’Andre Anderson of Vere Technical 47.79s. Tahj Hamm won the Class Two event in 47.72s, ahead of Bryan Level of Edwin Allen, who clocked 48.07s, and Derrick Grant of Ferncourt High, 49.01s. Edwin Allen had a quinella in the Boy’s Class One triple jump as Odane Smith, 13.77m, won ahead of Trevor Gunzell, second with 13.38m. Damar Marshall of St Jago was best in the Class One high jump after clearing the bar at 2.09m, while Vere Technical’s Kimarly Cooper took second in 1.90m. Top five – Boys 1. St Jago – 375 2. Edwin Allen – 188 3. Bridgeport – 84 4. Clarendon College – 83 5. Charlemont – 80 Top five – Girls 1. Edwin Allen – 337.5 2. Hydel – 336.5 3. St Jago – 325 4. Holmwood – 273 5. Vere – 124last_img read more

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Peach Bowl video: Prewitt, Schakelford & Hilton talk Ole Miss’s defense vs. TCU

first_imgPlay VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 0:00Loaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%0:00 Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1ChaptersChaptersdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionssubtitles off, selectedSubtitlescaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedCaptionsAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window. The Video Cloud video was not found. Error Code: VIDEO_CLOUD_ERR_VIDEO_NOT_FOUND Session ID: 2020-09-17:b8b7199d4232bd525bfc215c Player ID: videojs-brightcove-player-545734-3964360286001 OK Close Modal DialogCaption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDoneClose Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Ole Miss defensive backs Cody Prewitt and Mike Hilton and linebacker Deterrian Schakelford discuss how the Rebels plan to limit Trevone Boykin’s mobility, being aggressive up front & takeaways from this season. (Courtney Cronin/Clarion-Ledger)last_img read more

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Player said to be having West Ham medical today, flying to…

first_imgAfter reporting that West Ham United had reached an agreement for the Vitória Guimarães striker Xande Silva, the Portuguese press now claims that the player is signing for the club on Wednesday. According to newspaper O Jogo, the 21-year-old is flying to London to have his medicals and then sign a three-year contract with the Hammers today.The player had his last training for Vitória Guimarães on Tuesday, but said goodbye to teammates and staff right after the session.O Jogo claims that he’s moving on an initial €1.5m deal, with some performance bonuses which can make the transfer cost up to €3.5m for West Ham.Embed from Getty ImagesDespite saying the agreement is ‘pratically concluded’, the player’s agent Ulisses Santos has refused to publicly confirm the deal to the newspaper.But other outlets such as Record and A Bola also back-up the transfer and timeframe. They agree that Silva should first join West Ham’s U-23 squad, and then fight for his place in the first team.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksTrending TodayForge of Empires – Free Online GameChallenge Your Brain With This Must-Play Strategy Game. No Install.Forge of Empires – Free Online GameUndoRaid: Shadow Legends | Free DownloadEven Non-Gamers Are Obsessed With This RPG Game (It’s Worth Installing!)Raid: Shadow Legends | Free DownloadUndoPremier Diamond BoutiqueHong Kong’s first lab-grown diamond empirePremier Diamond BoutiqueUndo聽多多 Hearmore.asia1969年前出生的香港居民現可免費試戴頂尖的歐洲助聽器聽多多 Hearmore.asiaUndoDating.comTung Chung is actually full of single men. Check them out on this premium dating site!Dating.comUndoStanChart by CNBC CatalystDigitization in Banks Is No Longer About Efficiency, but Business Resilience. Don’t Get Left Behind.StanChart by CNBC CatalystUndoInstant Voice TranslatorGenius Japanese Invention Allows You To Instantly Speak 43 LanguagesInstant Voice TranslatorUndoCNBC InternationalSingapore’s Freelancers Find New Income During the Coronavirus Pandemic.CNBC InternationalUndoKeto减肥1個簡單的妙招一夜「融化」腹部贅肉(今晚試試)Keto减肥Undolast_img read more

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Who is this Stoycho Stoilov? Was he born in London?

first_img© Plovdiv24.bgHristo Krusharski’s advisor at Lokomotiv Plovdiv and a legend of Bulgarian football – Chavdar Tsvetkov, spoke quite sharply about the sports director of CSKA-Sofia Stoycho Stoilov. Chavo admitted that Stoilov insulted the owner of the “Smurfs” after calling him a “peasant”.We can easily define the refereeing in the match with CSKA as a “robbery.” I do not understand what the head of the referees does and how he can send such referees to play the matches. Who is this Stoycho Stoilov and what has he achieved in football, to allow himself to insult our owner Hristo Krusharski, calling him a peasant. By this logic, I am also a peasant, as I am a native of Svoge. Let me ask this Stoilov what he did and was he born in London? “How can he treat a person like Krusharski in this way, who only gives money for football in our country out of his own pocket,” Tsvetkov told gong.bg.“Stoilov did not take a single penny, he only took it from football. Ventsi Stefanov is right that the people who invest in football should be respected. These people should not be offended, but” highways “should be built for them. “, announced Tsvetkov.last_img read more

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