A Genetic Cause for Iron Deficiency

first_imgThe discovery of a gene for a rare form of inherited iron deficiency may provide clues to iron deficiency in the general population – particularly iron deficiency that doesn’t respond to iron supplements. The finding was published online by the journal Nature Genetics on April 13.Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency and the leading cause of anemia in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Most cases are easily reversed with oral iron supplements, but over the years, Mark Fleming, interim Pathologist-in-Chief at Children’s Hospital Boston, and pediatric hematologist Nancy Andrews, formerly of Children’s Hospital and now Dean of Duke University School of Medicine, had been referred a number of children with iron deficiency anemia who didn’t respond to oral supplements, and only poorly to intravenous iron.The cause of their condition – termed iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA) – was a mystery. The children all had good diets, and none had any condition that might interfere with iron absorbtion or cause chronic blood loss, the most common causes of iron deficiency anemia. Seeing reports of several similarly afflicted families in the medical literature, Flemming and Andrews were convinced that genetics was a factor.“After nearly 15 years, we finally had enough families that we could begin to think about positionally cloning the gene for the disorder,” says Fleming, who is also an associate professor of pathology at Harvard Medical School.Fleming and Andrews, experts in iron metabolism, and their colleagues Karin Finberg and Matthew Heeney, studied five extended families with more than one chronically iron-deficient member. They found a variety of mutations in a gene called TMPRSS6 (the acronym stands for transmembrane serine protease S6) in all of these families, as well as several patients without a family history of the disorder. Although IRIDA is quite rare, the authors believe it might be the extreme end of a broad continuum of disease, since TMPRSS6 mutations varied widely in the five families and caused different degrees of iron deficiency and anemia.“Our observations suggest that more common forms of iron deficiency anemia may have a genetic component,” says Andrews.All patients in the study apparently had recessive mutations, since their parents did not have iron deficiency anemia. The investigators now want to determine whether people with just a single abnormal copy of TMPRSS6 have subtler alterations in iron absorption that might not otherwise have come to the attention of a hematologist.Although the mechanism is still unknown, deficiency of the TMPRSS6 protein causes the body to produce too much hepcidin, a hormone that inhibits iron absorption by the intestine. Normally, hepcidin is produced to protect the body against iron overload- but patients with IRIDA make large amounts of hepcidin even through they are iron deficient. “People with this disorder make too much hepcidin, putting the brakes on iron absorption inapropriately,” Fleming says.In addition, patients with TMPRSS6 mutations cannot make new red blood cells efficiently because the iron needed to make them comes from macrophages, and hepcidin causes macrophages to hold on to iron. This explains the patients’ poor response to intravenous iron – the iron is trapped in macrophages and cannot be used for red blood cell production.The fact that TMPRSS6 regulates hepcidin may open up new avenues for therapy, the researchers say. For example, blocking TMPRSS6 may help patients with iron overload disorders make more hepcidin in order to limit intestinal iron absorption.  Conversely, stimulating TMPRSS6 may have therapeutic benefit in certain patients with anemia, particularly those in which hepcidin is overproduced.The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health.last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s panel explores Constitution, populism, Trump

first_imgSaint Mary’s and Bethel College history faculty discussed the Constitution, populism and Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a panel for Constitution Week, proclaimed by President Barack Obama in recognition of the anniversary of the United States Constitution.During the discussion, led by Saint Mary’s history professor Bill Svelmoe, Saint Mary’s political science department chair Marc Belanger said there are more demands on the Constitution as the world grows more complex.“I’m not saying it’s outdated, but the inefficiencies stand out much more now,” he said.Svelmoe said the inefficiency can lead to populist discontent, which can be seen throughout history as well as in this year’s presidential candidates.“The first populist movement has regular folk rising up with some degree of discontent, and the second populist movements tends to have big solutions or big questions,” he said. “They don’t want to have incremental change; they want huge change.”Saint Mary’s political science professor Pat Pierce said the writers of the Constitution did not want that polarized mindset in the government.“What they really had in mind was a mixed constitution — it wasn’t straight democracy,” he said. “A pure democracy would inevitably fall apart.”Pierce said the U.S. system is unusual in the power ordinary people have.“Instead of relying on folks in the group of elites to make nominations, it is ordinary citizens,” he said. “Donald Trump would have never been nominated by the Republican party.”John Haas, an associate professor of history at Bethel College, pointed out the implications of having an inexperienced politician like Trump in office.“James Madison talked about how there’s a multiplying of factions,” he said. “When you inject an ego like Trump’s into the U.S. government, it’s a huge game changer. He’s going to rearrange everything.”Pierce said the Constitution was based on fear of tyranny.“They were intensely concerned with tyranny,” Pierce said. “It was why we had a mixed constitution. The way Trump is claiming he can build a wall, it’s as if tyranny doesn’t exist.”Pierce said drastic political statements like Trump’s corrupt citizens.“There’s a certain corruption of the public when the government works in a particular way,” he said. “Those kinds of statements corrupt [the] public, so we stop understanding the way the political system operates.”Carol Halperin, an adjunct professor of history at Saint Mary’s, said if a president overshoots boundaries, the government can act.“The Constitution provides the ability to impeach a president,” she said. “If he takes advantage, he can be removed.”Pierce said the “corruption of the public” is partially due to the media.“The kind of emotional manipulation through an outlet like Fox News, many of the conditions they believe exist, don’t,” Pierce said. “Their perception of reality is just so out of whack from what’s really going on.”Svelmoe said the media is polarizing the nation.“With the media, the way we fractured ourselves, our whole universe of facts is just completely different,” he said. “We’re whipping up this animosity for the other side.”Halperin said Trump and Hillary Clinton are unlikely to reverse the trend of polarization.“You know it’s bad when you find yourself starting to miss Richard Nixon,” she said. “He did have a presidential air about him, and the two candidates we have now are almost universally disliked.”last_img read more

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William A. Stratton

first_imgWilliam A. Stratton, age 83, passed away May 1, 2012, at his home in Hidden Valley Airpark, Denton, TX after a battle with Alzheimer Disease. Bill was born near Carnforth, in Poweshiek County, Iowa to George and Gertrude Parks Stratton. A couple of years later the family moved to a farm near Ladora. Bill attended Hartford #5 Country School and graduated from Marengo High School. Bill lived most of his life in Texas. He was a W.W.II Veteran of the U.S. Navy and was a Master Mason for over 40 years. He sailed all over the world as a Merchant Marine Steamship Engineer for 35 years. Bill attained the rating of Chief Engineer on Steam Turbine Electric powered ships. He held FAA private, Instrument, and Commercial licenses to fly single engine aircraft. Bill’s last trip from Texas to Iowa was in his home built aircraft in 2007 to visit family and friends in and around Marengo. He was a life long motorcyclist and his first trip from Iowa to Texas was on a motorcycle.    He is survived by his wife, Martha Stratton, son William Stratton, Jr. of Allen TX, one brother, Everett Stratton of Jasper, TX, step children Maxie Wilbanks of Panorama City, CA. Marcia Andrews of Port Arthur, TX and seven grandchildren. Proceeding him in death were his parents, daughter Susan, brother Dallas and sister Mary Anne.   A memorial service will be held Friday, May 25, 2012 at 7:00 P.M. at the Shady Shores Baptist Church in Denton, TX. Burial plans are pending.last_img read more

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Bernie Sanders to hold Senate hearing on gas prices in Burlington August 6

first_imgSenator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) today announced that the US Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee will hold a field hearing on Monday in Burlington, Vermont, to explore gasoline prices in northwestern Vermont.A significant gas price gap between Burlington and the rest of the country has virtually disappeared since Sanders on July 2 first called for a federal investigation into unusually high gasoline prices in the Burlington area. ‘Many Vermonters have contacted my office wanting to know why gas prices have been significantly higher in northwestern Vermont than in the rest of the state and the country. Just about three weeks ago, for example, gas prices at stations owned by the same company were 23 cents higher in Burlington than Middlebury. I am happy to say that in recent weeks, I have detected a more competitive spirit among gas stations in Chittenden County and that gas prices here are, for the first time in months, at the same level as the national average.’ On July 5, the senator made public information showing gasoline prices in Burlington in late June were 10 cents to 43 cents greater than a Federal Trade Commission computer model projected they should be. On July 13, Sanders revealed that gasoline profit margins in the Burlington area in June were double the national average, according to a leading, independent fuel price research firm. Burlington was the most lucrative gas market in the Northeast, according to the Oil Price Information Service. Today, average gasoline prices in the greater Burlington area were identical to the national average. Both stood at $3.53 a gallon at noon today, according to GasBuddy.com. On July 2, the average retail gasoline price in greater Burlington was about 25 cents higher than the national average. Sanders is a member of the Senate energy committee. Monday’s hearing will be followed by a forum to give the public an opportunity to ask questions and make comments. Who: Sen. Bernie Sanders will chair the hearing. Witnesses include Ben Brockwell, director of data, pricing and information services for the Oil Price Information Service; Rob Leuck, vice president and regional manager of Costco Whoesale, Jim Coutts, director Franklin County Senior Center; Joe Choquette III of the Vermont Petroleum Association; and Gail Horne, owner of the Keelers Bay Variety Store (and gas station) in South Hero, Vt. What: U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources Field Hearing When: 2 p.m., Monday, Aug., 6, 2012 Where: Contois Auditorium, Burlington City Hall; 149 Church St., Burlington, Vt.Source: WASHINGTON, August 1 ‘Senator Bernie Sanderslast_img read more

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Is your brand an outhouse, penthouse, jumphouse, or lighthouse?

first_imgThere are all kinds of houses. Small houses and big houses. Houses for kids and houses for seniors. Houses you rent and houses you own. There are beach houses and mountain houses. Mansions and condos.But what type of house is your brand? Whether you realize it or not, you can view your brand as a type of house. And just like a house, your brand better have a strong foundation. Like the three little pigs, if your brand house is built with straw or sticks, when the wolf (your competitors) come by they are going to blow down your house.There are four house types you can categorize as your brand. The first three you probably want to avoid, while the fourth is one to achieve. Here they are:(1)    OuthouseYou know what you do in an outhouse (insert your own joke here). If you’ve ever had to use a port-a -potty at a public event, you know how they smell. Rancid. Stale. Old. Disgusting. Do those words describe your brand? The reality is over time your brand can easily become stale. It can stink. Especially if you let it sit too long without attending to it (get the idea?). Every several years it’s a good idea to take a deep dive examination into your brand to determine if it’s still fresh or not. On a side note, one of the things we do in a marketing audit is the “smell test.” We actually smell your bathrooms to see what they are communicating about your brand. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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CBRE Completes Sale of Town Square at Surprise

first_imgBarry Gabel, Chris Marchildon, Steve Julius and Jesse Goldsmith with CBRE’s Phoenix office negotiated the sale on behalf of the seller, Phoenix-based Surprise Center Development Company, LLC. They buyer was MA & MA Investments, an Arizona limited liability company, and was represented by Philip Wurth with Colliers International. CBRE has completed the sale of Town Square at Surprise located at 14155 W. Bell Rd. in Surprise, Ariz. The free-standing, ±12,771 SF retail strip center commanded a sale price of $2.7M. The property was 81 percent leased at time of sale. Developed by a joint venture between Columbus, Ohio-based Glimcher and Carefree Partners Investments, LLC of Scottsdale in 2008, Town Square at Surprise is a contemporary, free-standing retail strip center located in a rapidly developing area. As part of the Surprise Civic Center development and with proximity to the Surprise spring training facility as well as residential, medical, office, big box retailers and hotels, the property benefits from numerous amenities. Additionally, current tenants include several popular establishments including Pei Wei Asian Diner, Jimmy Johns, Edward Jones, R&S Mattress and The Joint, a lifetime family wellness chiropractic place that will continue to drive traffic to the retail center.last_img read more

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News Scan for Jul 08, 2020

first_imgEbola sickens 2 more in DRC outbreakTests have confirmed two more Ebola infections in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) Equateur province outbreak, and both are patients from Mbandaka, the provincial capital, the country’s multisector Ebola technical committee (CMRE) said today in an update.The new cases lift the illness total in the country’s 11th Ebola outbreak to 43. The CMRE also reported one more death, which occurred in the community in Mbandaka, a factor known to raise the risk of transmission. So far, 18 people have died from their infections. Health officials also noted that 8,758 people in the outbreak area have been vaccinated with Merck’s VSV-EBOV Ebola vaccine.The outbreak began in early June in the same area where the DRC’s ninth outbreak occurred in 2018, which resulted in 54 cases, 33 of them fatal.Jul 8 CMRE update H5N6 avian flu outbreaks reported in Vietnamese poultryVietnam reported two more highly pathogenic H5N6 avian flu outbreaks, which struck village poultry in different cities in Quang Ngai province in the central part of the country, according to a notification from the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE).The outbreaks began on Jun 25 and Jun 29, and, taken together, the virus killed 3,987 of 8,100 susceptible birds. Officials culled the surviving poultry to help prevent further disease spread.Vietnam is among Asian countries that have reported sporadic H5N6 outbreaks. It’s last outbreak involving the strain occurred in May.Jul 8 OIE report on H5N6 in Vietnamlast_img read more

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Multinationals in battle for quality London office space

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Felony Charges Against Manhattan Teen Dropped

first_imgFelony charges against the Manhattan teen accused of burglarizing the Dunemere Lane home formerly owned by the journalist George Stephanopoulos, and his wife, actress Alexandra Wentworth, have been dropped. Conor Patrick Daly Harkins, 19, was arrested by East Hampton Village police after being found unconscious on the lawn at 20 Dunemere Lane early June 1, police reported at the time.The police said that Harkins, the son of a prominent Wall Street attorney, had broken into the house and gone on a rampage, before passing out. “Among the items destroyed or badly damaged, according to the complaint, was a dining room table, the walls of the dining room, the front and rear screen doors, and several screen windows,” The Independent reported at the time.On October 9, in the courtroom of New York State Justice Richard Ambro in Riverside, Harkins entered a guilty plea to one misdemeanor count of trespassing. The two felony charges of burglary and criminal mischief were dropped in satisfaction to that plea, according to court records.His attorney, Richard Pellegrino II, said Friday, November 30, that when Harkins returns to court for sentencing on October 9, 2019, the trespassing charge will be dropped. Pellegrino would not comment on the terms of the deal struck with the district attorney’s office, or whether his client paid restitution to the owners of the property, which was purchased from Stephanopoulos and Wentworth by a limited liability company in 2013.“The initial [news] reporting was very inaccurate,” Pellegrino said. “They made my client out to be a drug abuser.” Pellegrino said the only drug found in Harkins’s system at the time was alcohol. There was no reference to any drug other than alcohol in The Independent’s coverage, which is available online.The incident occurred following a post-prom party at the home on Further Lane belonging to Marc and Diane Spilker, according to a statement of a friend of Harkins who was at the party. According to court documents, that teen told police that he and Harkins were part of a group picked up by a chartered bus on Sutton Place in Manhattan. Harkins’s friend also said the group was consuming alcohol from the very beginning of the bus ride. The incident occurred at about 6 AM, according to the teen, when Harkins jumped out of an Uber car headed back to Manhattan at the intersection of Dunemere and James lanes.t.e@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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Japan losing grip on silicon wafer market, external factors highlighted in demise

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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