GMP seeks use of compressed process for after-merger rate-setting

first_imgby Alan Panebaker vtdigger.org Vermontâ s two largest utilities plan to use a streamlined rate-setting procedure to â blend’their electricity rates.Gaz Metro is in the process of obtaining state approval for the purchase of Central Vermont Public Service. The Montreal-based company plans to merge its Vermont subsidiary, Green Mountain Power, with CVPS. If the deal goes through as expected, 80 percent of Vermonters will receive electricity from the new company.Once the utilities have merged, Gaz Metro will use a process called â Alternative Regulation’to request approval of its new blended rate for the combined utilities. This protocol limits public involvement but saves money by sidestepping a lengthy process with the Public Service Board.AARP-Vermont is worried that the alternative rate-setting process will limit public scrutiny of Gaz Metroâ s plan to recoup $21 million through higher rates.In 2001 the board allowed Green Mountain Power and CVPS to increase rates to cover losses associated with a power purchasing deal with Hydro-Quebec. In exchange, the board required the utilities to agree to a â windfall’sharing mechanism should either be sold. In a 2012 memorandum of understanding with the Vermont Department of Public Service, Gaz Metro agreed to return $21 million owed to CVPS ratepayers through investments in weatherization and efficiencies; it plans to recoup the money, plus 7 percent interest, through rate increases.According to one Public Service Board decision, the contract with Hydro-Quebec could have cost somewhere around $130 million in extra costs between 1999 and 2016.AARP challenged the original agreement between state regulators and the utilities. The advocacy group for seniors wanted that money to go to customers in the form of a refund or check.â If the MOU is approved, there will be no opportunity later in a rate proceeding for AARP or ratepayers to object, to submit testimony, to submit argument, or to request an investigation as to whether the $20.9 million spent on weatherization, efficiency, economic development, etc., should be in the rate base,’AARPâ s filing states.The two utilities have used the Alternative Regulation process for years. Green Mountain Power started in 2006 and CVPS in 2008. Unlike traditional â cost-of-service regulation’rate setting, which can take a number of months, the alternative process requires filings every three months. Increases or decreases in electricity costs pass through to ratepayers. Under some forms of alternative regulation, utilities can earn a larger profit if they meet performance or efficiency goals.Only CVPS, Green Mountain Power and Vermont Gas Systems, also a Gaz Metro subsidiary, use the process. They are all investor-owned rather than publicly owned. They also periodically use a full cost-of-service rate review process that allows more public input.For example, the Vermont Public Service Board approved a 7.46 percent rate increase for CVPS in early 2011, and another 4.8 percent rate increase in late 2011. On Tuesday, CVPS announced it was asking for a 2.2 percent surcharge that would go into effect in July that would cover expenses from Tropical Storm Irene.In 2011, Green Mountain Power asked for a 3.2 percent rate increase.With the more streamlined process, there is generally not a public hearing. The Department of Public Service and board decide whether to approve the new rates.Washington County Electric Co-op General Manager Avram Patt. VTD Photo/Josh LarkinThe alternative rate-setting structure is typical not controversial.Smaller, municipal or cooperative utilities generally do not use it because they have not found a way to make it work with their nonprofit structure.Avram Patt, general manager of Washington Electric Cooperative, said two years ago the community-owned electric company raised rates for the first time in 11 years, so there has not been a need for such frequent updating.Rate-setting in the context of the merger controversyDuring the last legislative session, lawmakers floated proposals to prohibit utilities from recovering money in rates for investments that do not benefit the electric system as a whole. This would include investments in thermal efficiency where a homeowner heats with fuel oil or some other non-electric source. The proposed provisions never became law.In the 2001 â bailout’agreement, the board limited the amount of money Green Mountain Power would have to share as a result of a profitable merger at $8 million and $16 million for CVPS. In 2007, when Green Mountain Power was sold to Gaz Metro, the board approved an efficiency program where the utilities would invest that money and ratepayers would benefit.Now the Department of Public Service and the utilities propose doing something similar, where the utilities will invest ratepayer money in a fund that will go toward weatherization and efficiency. That money will have to yield $25 million in energy savings for customers. Shareholders will get that $21 million investment back in rates, with 7 percent interest.That windfall requirement, which made headlines during the Legislature this session, could be approved as part of the overall docket rather than go through the more strenuous rate setting process that it would otherwise require, according to a final reply brief filed by AARP earlier this month.The utilities and the Department of Public Service agreed that investing the money in efficiency would yield more benefits than refund checks, but AARP says even if that is the case, there should be a more transparent process demonstrating how the investment benefits ratepayers.In a filing with the Public Service Board, AARP attorneys said they were worried that without the public process of traditional ratemaking, that money could be improperly spent without any recourse.â All or parts of the $20.9 million may turn out to have been imprudently spent, or may turn out to be not used and useful, and therefore not just and reasonable to recover in rates, but ratepayers will be forced to shoulder this load regardless,’the groupâ s most recent filing states.Jim Dumont, an attorney representing AARP in the docket, said it would be premature for the board to approve the expenditures before they occur.He is also concerned the process will go forward without enough substantive input from the public.â All of this elephant will pass through snake and come out the other end just the way they want it,’Dumont said.Sarah Hofmann, deputy commissioner of the Department of Public Service, said interested parties can ask for an investigation into the rationale for rate increases approved under alternative regulations.In that situation, the board would open a new case, which could take up to seven months.The advantage of the faster alternative regulation plan process as opposed to traditional rate cases, Hofmann said, is â itâ s done in real time rather than case time’and rates reflect more accurately the true price of electricity. It also saves litigation costs and allows utilities more access to credit also.Hofmann said the memorandum of understanding the department signed with the utilities offers additional safeguards for intervenors and the public.Under that MOU, the utilities must submit a report by July 1 that outlines how they will verify savings that result from the merger. Parties in the docket will be able to comment on the rate adjustments. Green Mountain Power will have to file a report each year for the next 10 years.Dorothy Schnure, a spokeswoman for Green Mountain Power, said customers will see either a rate decrease or less of an increase starting in October 2012.If the board accepts the MOU, the utilities will have to produce $2.5 million in savings for their customers in that first year. The next year it is $5 million. The utilities are required to verify $144 million in savings to customers. The $21 million in investments in efficiency, about $12 million of which will go to weatherization programs, is supposed to yield $25 million in benefits to customers through reduced electricity use.Schnure said the company is analyzing what their rate request would be this fall if nothing changed.â It will be $2.5 million less than it would be without the merger, should the merger be approved,’Schnure said. â In addition, weâ re looking for other savings to pass through to customers.âSchnure said the AARPâ s allegation that the board will not analyze the investment in the efficiency fund is incorrect. She said the board and the Department of Public Service will review how the money is spent to make sure the utilities act prudently.The utilities are asking for the alternative rate setting plan to carry through 2014, when there will be a full cost-of-service review of rates. Commercial and industrial rates will not be affected until then.Starting this summer, CVPS residential customers will pay about $87.43 on average each month. Recent rates published on the Green Mountain Power website show their residential customers purchasing a similar amount of power would pay around $84.89.Residential customers for both companies will pay the same rate starting Oct. 1, 2013, if the merger goes through. Schnure said she could not estimate what exactly the new blended rate will be. May 16, 2012 vtdigger.orglast_img read more

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Performance-based funding may affect UVM and Vermont state colleges

first_imgUniversity of Vermont,by Amy Ash Nixon vtdigger.org(link is external) Student retention and graduation rates, the cost of instruction, financial aid, student debt load, and job placement rates after graduation are measurements used in many states to link higher education dollars to performance-based funding. A higher education subcommittee put in place by the Legislature last session is beginning work on a performance-based funding proposal for Vermont which could affect funding for both the University of Vermont (UVM) and the Vermont State Colleges (VSC) system.The committee is looking at how many students served are from Vermont, from low-income backgrounds, are the first in their families to attend college, and come from minority groups.A proposal is due to the General Assembly and the governor by Dec. 15.Ultimately, a performance-based funding proposal could call for a portion of state funding for both UVM and the VSC system to be allocated “based upon nationally recognized and established performance measures,” according to the legislation.“One of the things that’s emerged in higher education has been the move toward attempting to see whether creating performance-based standards to meet specific state goals is a better way of utilizing scarce state resources rather than a traditional model,” said Scott Giles, CEO of Vermont Student Assistance Corp.Currently, $67 million in state funds is split between UVM and the VSC system, with UVM taking a larger portion, nearly two-thirds of the pot.Of that amount, UVM receives $42.5 million and VSC receives $24.3 million to spread among five colleges.The UVM Allied Health Sciences programs also receive an additional $1.2 million in state appropriations.The Vermont Student Assistance Corp. receives a state appropriation annually, which was $19.4 million.Increasing the number of Vermonters with postsecondary education is important for the state’s economic goals, stakeholders have said.Tricia Coates, spokeswoman for the Vermont State Colleges, said that in 2009 state leaders agreed that by 2020 a total of 60 percent of Vermont adults should hold a postsecondary degree or credential.The state is at about 45 percent of that goal.VSC Chancellor Jeb Spaulding on Wednesday said performance-based funding is something the executive and legislative branches in Vermont have been moving toward, and he welcomes that approach for higher education.“It’s totally consistent with the direction being moved in by many, many states,” said Spaulding. “I certainly welcome the conversation.”Spaulding said the subcommittee will need to home in on priorities for Vermont.“I’m optimistic we can work with the committee and hopefully develop a proposal for the Legislature,” he said. “In a time of constrained revenues and budget challenges, it does make sense for the Legislature and the governor to say, ‘OK, if we don’t have a lot of new money, let’s make sure the money we’re spending on higher education is being spent in a way that’s most likely to give us the desired outcomes we want.’”In other states, the performance-based funding model has incentivized colleges to educate more low-income and first-in-family college students.“It’s changed institutional behavior and led to a higher rate of citizens in those states earning degrees, and that would be a fine thing for the state of Vermont and our economic future,” Spaulding said.UVM President Tom Sulivan. Vermont Business Magazine file photoTom Sullivan, president of UVM, “fully endorses” performance-based funding for higher education.“UVM is performing exceedingly well in all objective bases, including financial access, affordability, retention, graduation, and career placement metrics compared to its national peers,” Sullivan said. “We can demonstrate through our outcomes and economic impact data that we are spending the state appropriation very wisely, and that UVM’s modest state appropriation represents a remarkable return on investment in Vermont.”VSC graduation, debt, student aidA total of 12,305 students are enrolled in Vermont State Collges and 84 percent are from Vermont.The retention rates for the 2013 to 2014 school year show Vermont Technical College with the highest overall student retention rates, with 71 percent on average for all students and 72 percent for Vermont students.The four-year graduation rates for first-time, full-time students within the VSC system are highest for Castleton both for the overall student body and students from Vermont, at 35 percent and 37 percent, respectively.The graduation rates for first-time, full-time Vermont students from Johnson are 20 percent; for Lyndon, 18 percent, and from Vermont Tech, 35 percent.At CCV, it’s lower, 5 and 6 percent respectively, but many students at CCV take only a course or a few courses and may transfer out and complete degrees elsewhere, which is typical for community colleges, said spokeswoman Pamela Chisholm.CCV’s graduation rate overall is 17 percent, compared to the national average for community colleges of 18 percent, said Chisholm.Within the VSC system overall, of 1,904 total degrees awarded (not including master’s level degree recipients), 949 were low-income, 1,125 were first generation, 147 were from minority groups and 987 were adults 25 years or older and 85 percent were earned by Vermonters.VSC Financial AidThe information shows that 80 percent of CCV students receive financial aid with an average award of $4,765; at Castleton, 71 percent of students receive financial aid, with an average award of $6,339; at Johnson, 85 percent receive assistance averaging $7,480; at Lyndon, 84 percent receive financial help, averaging $7,104; and at Vermont Tech, 74 percent of students receive aid, an average award of $7,100.The average student debt load for the VSC system is:Castleton, $22,096;Johnson, $20,963;Lyndon, $19,944;Vermont Tech, $21,892;CCV, $7,319.Eighty-four percent of the VSC students last year were Vermonters, according to the VSC presentation.UVM student, cost dataAt UVM, the net cost of attendance after all non-loan financial aid for Vermonters in fiscal year 2014 was $16,655; for out-of-state it was $33,057.The average student aid award for Vermonters was $9,467, a 37 percent discount, while for out-of-state students, a 30 percent discount with aid averaging $13,991, was awarded.A total of 31.4 percent of the undergraduates at UVM in the fall of 2014 were Vermonters, said UVM spokesman Enrique Corredera on Monday. Including graduate students, UVM’s student body is 36.4 percent Vermonters, he said.Student loan debt for Vermont students with loans averages $21,475 upon graduation, and $26,000 for out-of-state students, compared to the national average of $28,600, according to the UVM presentation.The retention rate from fall 2013 to fall 2014 for Vermonters was 92 percent at UVM, 85 percent for out-of-state students.Degree completion rates at UVM for Vermonters is 64 percent at UVM, and 61 percent for out-of-state students.First-generation students earning a degree included 269 students from Vermont, and 207 out-of-state; the number of Pell recipients earning a degree included 243 from Vermont and 247 out-of-state; and students from minority groups included 67 Vermonters, and 146 out-of-state students, the UVM data shows.VERY TOP PHOTO: UVM graduation 2015 by Sally McCaylast_img read more

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UVM study: CR strategy could save 25,000 lives and prevent 180,000 hospitalizations annually

first_imgby Nancy Stearns Bercaw UVM (link sends e-mail)More than two million Americans experience some type of a cardiac event every year. Whether they’ve had a heart attack or coronary revascularization procedure, such as bypass surgery or coronary stent placement, doctors typically recommended these patients participate in Cardiac Rehabilitation (CR) as outpatients. However, despite the proven benefits of increased longevity and reduced hospitalizations with CR, only 20 to 30 percent of eligible patients actually participate.Philip Ades, MD (Photo: Larner COM Design & Photography)Why are the rates for this comprehensive secondary prevention program so low?  And how can they be improved?An article published online November 14, 2016 in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings (link is external)by lead author Philip Ades, M.D., professor of medicine at The Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont and associate director of the Vermont Center on Behavior and Health, offers answers and solutions. Written by participants of the Cardiac Rehabilitation Collaborative (CRC), a group of experts convened by Million Hearts(link is external), the paper identifies ways to increase participation rates to at least 70 percent among eligible patients – an outcome that, if adopted nationwide, could save 25,000 lives and reduce hospitalizations by 180,000 annually. According to the report, two steps are necessary to substantially increase CR participation: First, the systematic referral of eligible patients needs to be increased and, second, the successful enrollment and adherence of those who are referred to CR needs to be optimized.“While there are many reasons that individuals do not attend CR, including geographic availability of a program, the primary reason – and one that is modifiable – is that doctors and caregivers do not recommend it strongly enough,” says Ades.  “Referral and enrollments would be substantially improved if the hospital electronic discharge process required the physician to address CR referral, such that appropriate patients leave the hospital with a CR appointment scheduled for a week or so after hospital discharge,” Ades says, adding that a “liaison” should be assigned to meet with each patient to introduce the concept of CR and help coordinate the referral process.The authors of the paper found that automatic electronic medical record referrals combined with the use of a liaison led to referral rates of 86 percent and participation rates of over 70 percent compared to 32 percent in controls who received neither intervention.Participation rates would skyrocket, say Ades and his colleagues, if CR referral was considered to be a “quality of care indicator,” like aspirin and statin use after a heart attack. The authors reference a study done using the American College of Cardiology’s National Cardiovascular Data Registry that documented a referral rate to “over 80 percent in hospitals participating in quality improvement activities.“ The Cardiac Rehabilitation Collaborative is an open forum of individuals and organizations committed to improving the utilization of cardiac rehabilitation. Co-led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017, Million Hearts supports cardiac rehabilitation as a life-saving and life-enhancing intervention. “We are thrilled the members of CRC have banded together to boost participation in this important program,” said Janet Wright, M.D., F.A.C.C., and executive director of Million Hearts. “We know cardiac rehabilitation is vastly underutilized by eligible patients – and particularly among women, older Americans, people of color and those living in rural communities. Getting more eligible patients into cardiac rehab can save lives, and result in better health and quality of life for thousands of Americans each year.”Collaborators on the “Increasing Cardiac Rehabilitation Participation from 20 to 70 Percent: A Road Map from the Million Hearts Cardiac Rehabilitation Collaborative” publication include:  Steven J. Keteyian Ph.D., Director, Preventive Cardiology, Henry Ford Hospital;Larry F. Hamm, Ph.D., Professor and Director, Clinical Exercise Physiology Program, Department of Exercise and Nutrition Science, The George Washington University;  Karen Lui R.N, M.S., GRQ LLC, Vienna, VA;Kimberly Newlin, A.N.P., Clinical Manager, Cardiac and Pulmonary Rehabilitation, Sutter Roseville Medical Center, Roseville, CA; Donald S Shepard, Ph.D., Professor, Heller School for Social Policy and Management, Brandeis University; and,Randal J. Thomas M.D., M.S., Professor of Medicine, Medical Director, Cardiac Rehabilitation Program, Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo ClinicWatch a video of Ades explaining the study results here(link is external).Source: UVM 11.14.2016last_img read more

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State and federal recovery grants still available, but some are expiring soon

first_imgBusiness ImpactACCD wants to hear from all Vermont businesses impacted by the response to the COVID-19 virus. Please share these impacts via the ACCD Business Impact Form(link is external), which will help us assess the full impact as we work toward solutions.PPP Forgiveness Daily WebinarThe SBA Vermont District Office hosts a free daily webinar from 9 to 10 a.m. Monday to Friday to discuss Paycheck Protection Program forgiveness and other changes.To join the webinar, visit https://meet.lync.com/sba123/sbmazza/SFFM2N9R(link is external).To join by phone, call (202) 765-1264 and when prompted enter the code 237511921#. Upon joining the call, mute the phone to cut down on the background noise and please do not place the call on hold as the hold music will be heard over the presenter.For more information, email susan.mazza@sba.gov(link sends e-mail). PPP & EIDL Webinar Tuesdays & ThursdaysIn response to the COVID-19 pandemic the SBA Vermont District Office hosts a free webinar from 9 to 10 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays to discuss the Paycheck Protection Program, the Economic Injury Disaster Loan and Advance, and any pertinent updates.To join the webinar, visit https://meet.lync.com/sba123/sbmazza/6F6N4YK6(link is external).To join by phone, call (202) 765-1264 and when prompted enter the code 470177937#. Upon joining the call, mute the phone to cut down on the background noise and please do not place the call on hold as the hold music will be heard over the presenter.For more information, email chris.herriman@sba.gov(link sends e-mail).Source: Agency of Commerce & Community Development. 7.28.2020 Register Your Lodging Establishment with FedRoomsThe Vermont Procurement Technical Assistance Center (VT PTAC) is assisting lodging venues in registering in FedRooms, the only official government-wide lodging program. FedRooms is a managed hotel program with an annual RFP process. In order to receive the RFP, hoteliers must first submit a Business Case Form which is due by August 1, 2020. If approved, FedRooms then puts your property in front of potential government travelers. Visit the VT PTAC website(link is external) for more information on this program. BIPOC Farmer Relief Grants Now AvailableThe Northeast BIPOC Farmer Relief Fund is now accepting applications from BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and People of Color) folks living in Vermont and the Northeast. The program is being run through the Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Working Group(link is external) and the application window is open until August 10th. by Timothy McQuiston, Vermont Business Magazine Several important economic recovery loan and grant programs, with both federal and state funding, are approaching deadlines. But those and some ongoing programs still have money available. The most pressing grant program is the state sole proprietor program whose final application deadline is Thursday at midnight and whose funding will likely be exhausted. Other programs like the SBA’s EIDL and Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) are still open for new applications and still have money available. The state’s own Economic Recovery Grants programs also have funds available.Economic Development Commissioner John Goldstein told VBM Tuesday that while the US SBA EIDL grant/advances are no longer available, the loan portion of the program is still open. Small businesses typically can get up to $150,000 in the form of a low interest loan with payments not beginning for 12 months.For the PPP, which is mostly a grant program if funds are used to sustain employment, the August 8 deadline is fast approaching. The PPP offers a greater amount of money than the EIDL or any of the other financing available by the state or federal governments. Click HERE(link is external) for information on how to apply for the PPP and EIDL. Frequent Webinars are also available (see below).Goldstein said, “There are still ample funds available in PPP.  The date may be extended as we watch what the Senators and Congress do: It may be extended and it may allow those who already received a PPP to get another one. All eyes on DC to see what will survive the talks.”As for the state grants, there is still time and money to apply for most, but not all, of them.The Tax Department and the Agency of Commerce & Community Development offer Economic Recovery Grants to small businesses from two pools of money (see links below).The first pool of money is comprised of $70 million allocated by the Legislature. Some $50 million of this is being distributed by the Tax Department and targets restaurants, hospitality and retail operations. Those close-contact businesses were shut down in the early spring as part of the mitigation efforts to slow down the pandemic in Vermont. Another $20 million is available to general business.The second, larger pool of $96 million is available to small businesses who have seen significant losses as a result of the pandemic. All these programs come with some strings attached.”Yes, there is still money available in both the Tax and ACCD programs,” Goldstein said. “Tax has distributed about $50 million and is about finished with the current applicants. ACCD has distributed $10.8 million and will distribute approximately another $10 million this week. In total, the ACCD program received $43 million in total ask. There is money available in both programs, so, yes, businesses should definitely apply.” A separate program targeting sole proprietors (see links below) has nearly concluded.Housing Commissioner Josh Hanford said the sole-proprietor grant registration deadline ended Monday night at midnight, however for those who have registered, the application submission deadline is Friday (July 31) at midnight. As of Tuesday morning there were 110 completed applications submitted; 251 incomplete; and 81 in process.  Hanford said all funding ($1.5 million) is anticipated to be awarded on August 14 through a lottery system.  “We are planning to make available an additional allocation of $1.8 million in CDBG sole-proprietor grants in mid-August,” he said.     Sole Proprietor Grants Application DeadlineThe Sole Proprietor Stabilization Grant Program application window closes this Friday, July 31, 2020. Grants of $5,000, $7,500 or $10,000 to qualifying sole proprietors will be awarded through a lottery draw. Full details can be found on the program portal(link is external), including the program breakdown, eligibility requirements, application materials and timelines, as well as technical assistance and FAQs.Economic Recovery GrantsFunds are still available to Vermont businesses who can demonstrate a revenue decline of at least 50% in any one-month period from March 1, 2020 to August 31, 2020, when compared with the same month in 2019. The Economic Recovery Grants landing page(link is external) has full details, including eligibility requirements, document preparation instructions, and a series of FAQs(link is external) to assist businesses in completing the application.September 8 to be Official School Start DateGovernor Phil Scott announced he will sign an executive order calling for a universal school start date of September 8, 2020, which will give schools more time to test and fine-tune plans for the start of the academic year. State, school and health officials said at Tuesday’s press conference the data still supports in-person learning that can be done in a safe and measured way. Mask Mandate Signage AvailableACCD has available signage for businesses, organizations, and partners to help inform that masks will be required on August 1st. The signage options(link is external) also include posters to help explain why it is important to wear a mask and are part of the larger statewide mask education effort being coordinated through ACCD and the Agency of Human Services.center_img Funding Opportunity for Technical Assistance ProvidersACCD has issued a Notice of Funds Available for Small Business Recovery Technical Assistance(link is external). Through this Notice of Funds Available (NOFA), ACCD seeks expert concierge services to assist small businesses assess challenges and utilize technical experts to address those business challenges as a result of COVID-19. The deadline for proposals is August 3rd at 1:00pm EST. Virtual Job Fair for Southeastern VermontThe Vermont Department of Labor has announced a series of Virtual Job Fair events(link is external). On Thursday, July 30 at 11:00am, employers from Bennington, Middlebury, Rutland, and elsewhere in southwestern Vermont will highlight local career opportunities and conduct a Q&A session. Register to attend(link is external). UVM Study with Vermont Futures ProjectThe Vermont Futures Project(link is external) has partnered with the UVM Center for Research on a statewide survey of people taking refuge in Vermont during the COVID-19 pandemic. The objective is to learn what these temporary residents would need to make Vermont their permanent residence. The results will be shared with community and business leaders, policy makers, and others to help inform our next steps. Please share this survey(link is external) with your networks before the August 4th deadline.last_img read more

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Implementing CRM strategy, Human Race seeking Community Marketing Executive

first_imgLeading UK mass participation events company Human Race is on the look-out for a Community Marketing Executive to work in its Chessington, Surrey office.  The deadline for applications is Monday 26 August 2013; and a full job description and outline of the application procedure can be found online.Based in Chessington and managed by experienced individuals from the sports industry, Human Race is building a team of industry professionals to deliver, create and acquire mass participation events.At the heart of Human Race and its events is a community of participants, with whom the company communicates through database, social, online and live face-to-face touch-points. Human Race is increasingly aiming to engage with its members ‘in a bespoke and personal fashion with the aim of increasing loyalty and customer retention alongside continually aiming for community growth.’Human Race aims to support its community – from event discovery, to completion and beyond. This area is of particularly key importance to the overall business strategy and therefore this new role provides an opportunity for someone to have a big impact on the commercial success of the company.The Community Marketing Executive will be involved in implementing marketing and communications strategy to existing members of the Human Race community – with a focus on online platforms and e-communications.Reporting to the Senior Marketing Manager, during the initial period in the role, the Community Marketing Executive will be focused specifically on the delivery of the Human Race e-comms strategy. This will involve building, creating and sending customer communication emails (newsletters, sales HTMLs and participant race-communications) occupying approximately 70% of their time.Key duties:To manage the delivery of the Human Race CRM and e-CRM strategy, with the ultimate aim of driving entries, sponsor/partner engagement and drive customer loyaltyTo create and distribute pre-race, post-race, sales and newsletter emails and HTMLsEnsuring rights delivery for Human Race Sponsors and Partners across online, database and social platformsTo manage back-end website updates and content managementTo manage Human Race social media platformsTo drive content generation from events and media days including video footage and distribute across Human Race community platformsTo support with continual development of the Human Race website and updating with fresh contentTo drive the growth of the Human Race loyalty scheme and ClubTo manage the community merchandise strategyTo devise and implement competitions to increase community engagementTo provide on-going reports and measurements of success against community marketing activityTo attend Human Race events with a broad commercial role and write post event reports, requiring frequent working weekendsSkillsMarketing / CRM / customer marketingA strong working knowledge of HTML design and e-communications softwareA strong working knowledge of website content management systemsProficient design skills (Photoshop or indesign)Experience of videography and editing skillsA good understanding of social mediaCreativity and flairCommunicate clearly and concisely, both orally and in writingGood planning and organisation skills with an efficient work speedAbility to work to meet schedules and timelines, good time managementAttention to detailEmpathy for the customer / Human Race membersQualifications:Graduate – preferably with  IT / CRM & marketing focusWork Experience:Minimum 1 years work experience preferableSalary range:£17k – £21kApplication:Please submit a covering letter and CV noting current salary by Monday 26 August 2013 via email to: dan.lipman[at]humanrace.co.ukHuman Race is the UK’s largest and most diverse mass participation events company; owning and delivering 55 events in triathlon, cycling, running, duathlon and open water swimming for over 50,000 participants of all abilities and ages each year. The highly prestigious portfolio of events includes 11 triathlons, nine cycling events, 10 running events, 7 open water swims and 6 kids events.These events bring together an active community of people taking part in sporting events for reasons ranging from fitness, competition, charity, health, fun or to simply finish. The participants vary from nervous first timers aged from 4 to 80, through to World Champions. Collectively, the events raise millions of pounds for hundreds of charities.www.humanrace.co.uk Relatedlast_img read more

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Kelsey acquires The Endurance Show

first_imgKelsey Publishing has announced its acquisition of The Endurance Show, which takes place in Sandown Park, UK, from TCR Shows for an undisclosed amount. Next year’s Endurance Show takes place on 27-28 February 2016.Kelsey – which publishes Triathlon Plus, Running Fitness and Outdoor Fitness magazine among others – also welcomes David Townsend, The Endurance Show Director, to a new role as the Publishing and Commercial Director of Kelsey’s Fitness Portfolio of Brands.The Endurance Show was launched in 2009 as the London Running Show at Olympia in London. Since then, the event has moved to Sandown Park, Surrey and been re-launched to target all aspects of endurance sport.Event Director David Townsend said “The Endurance Show fits seamlessly with Kelsey’s Fitness titles in Running, Triathlon and Outdoor. Kelsey’s recent acquisition of a number of mass participation races further strengthens the group offering – with a complete range of events, activities and publications for the endurance athlete.”Steve Wright Chief Executive of Kelsey commented, “The acquisition of The Endurance Show will further consolidate our fitness group, creating a compelling commercial opportunity for brands looking to target active endurance athletes. David’s track record in creating market leading events, along with his previous experience in publishing, makes him the ideal candidate to take the fitness group to the next level.”David, through his company TCR Shows Ltd, launched the Triathlon Cycling & Running Show in 2003 which quickly became the number one event in its sector. This show was sold to 220 Triathlon publisher Immediate Media in 2013.Now working with Kelsey, David will be based at the company’s Kent office and will retain day-to-day management of The Endurance Show along with his publishing and commercial role on Running Fitness, Outdoor Fitness, Triathlon Plus and The Great Outdoors, and associated digital assets.www.enduranceshow.comwww.kelsey.co.uk Relatedlast_img read more

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As H1N1 vaccinations taper, CDC lists changes in distribution

first_imgMar 24, 2010 (CIDRAP News) – With the H1N1 vaccination program winding down, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) yesterday announced distribution system changes that will result in slower vaccine deliveries starting Apr 1.The CDC said it is shrinking its vaccine inventory because of the expiration of doses at the distribution depots and is reducing the number of depots, to one each for vaccine and for ancillary supplies. The changes will mean “a longer shipment timeline than the current same-day-fill timeline,” the notice said.In the H1N1 immunization program, states order vaccine from one central distributor, McKesson Corp. Tables included in the CDC notice show that, following the changes, it will take 4 business days for states to receive vaccine orders and 2 business days to receive ancillary supplies. Shipments to states and territories outside the continental United States will take longer.”These changes are being implemented based on the current status of 2009 H1N1 disease rates and vaccination activities in the US,” the CDC said, adding that it is making contingency plans to increase distribution again if necessary.A total of 162.5 million doses of H1N1 vaccine have been filled, finished, and released, CDC spokesman Tom Skinner told CIDRAP News today. That number is out of 229 million bulk doses ordered, at a cost of $1.6 billion, he said. The government had originally ordered a total of 251 million doses, but about 60% of an order from CSL Biotherapies was canceled in December in the wake of delayed deliveries.The CDC estimates that about 86 million people have been vaccinated and about 90 million doses have been administered, according to Skinner. Children younger than 10 years are recommended to get two doses.Under the new distribution plan, the CDC said, a vaccine depot in Memphis and an ancillary-supply depot in Columbus will serve all the states and other jurisdictions that order vaccine. Orders will still be placed in the same way as before.Vaccine inventory at the depots has been reduced since mid February as vaccine doses have expired, the agency said. “CDC is monitoring inventory on a regular basis, but is not currently ordering vaccine/supplies to replenish the depots,” the notice said. “However, in the event that product demand increases, CDC will resume replenishment orders.”Claire Hannan, executive director of the Association of Immunization Managers in Rockville, Md., said today that H1N1 vaccination efforts have diminished but are still going on.”I know that states are planning some promotional activities for Public Health Week [Apr 5 through 11],” she said. “I don’t think every state is still ordering vaccine, but I think there are still orders going.”Hannan said there’s a lack of good information now on how many doses of vaccine have been administered, because vaccination providers have been somewhat slow in providing the information to the states. “The states don’t have a good sense of how much inventory is out there; they don’t have all the information from providers,” she said.Hannan said much of the vaccine inventory now on hand will expire within the next few months, though a Sanofi vaccine sold in multidose vials won’t expire till next year. She said it’s likely that some of the supply will go to waste, though she couldn’t estimate how much.”I think some states are waiting for guidance on whether to save some of that Sanofi vaccine” with the 2011 expiration date, Hannan commented. She said CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices is looking at issues such as whether states should save some of the vaccine for use this fall in children who were supposed to get two doses but received only one.See also: Mar 23 CDC notice of changes in vaccine supply and distributionhttp://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/vaccination/changes_h1n1_vaccine_supply_dist.htmAug 10, 2009, CIDRAP News story “States to designate providers to give H1N1 vaccines”last_img read more

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NIAID: Zika is caused by 1 serotype

first_imgA new study published in Cell Reports said Zika virus infection is caused by only one serotype, and vaccinating against that one strain could offer protection from diverse strains of the arbovirus. This promising news comes as human Zika vaccine trials begin.To determine Zika’s serotype, researchers with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) investigated serum samples from eight people who’d recently been infected with the virus in South America. They mixed the samples with multiple strains of the virus to see if serum antibodies neutralized the virus.”Antibodies elicited after infection with Zika virus strains of the Asian lineage were able to potently inhibit both Asian lineage and African lineage strains,” the researchers said in an NIAID news release.Study offers focus for vaccine development”Vaccination against a single strain of Zika virus should be sufficient to protect against genetically diverse strains of the virus,” according to the  release.Theodore Pierson, PhD, chief of the viral pathogenesis section of NIAID’s laboratory of viral disease and a lead author on the study, said the goal was to determine whether or not strain variation would be important in developing vaccines.”In certain viruses, like influenza, the strain you use in vaccine development is very important,” he said. “But we saw that antibodies elicited by recent infections were capable of neutralizing both strains.”This means a vaccine targeting the virus would produce broadly neutralizing antibodies against all Zika infections, coming from either the African or Asian strain. The current outbreak in Americas is caused by the Asian strain of the virus.Pierson said that, unlike dengue virus, infection with different strains of Zika isn’t likely to cause new or worsening disease, and one vaccine could be protective against various strains of Zika.”When the body is challenged with a virus, it’s possible it could mount different antibodies  based on the serotypes it sees,” said Pierson. “But that’s not what we saw [with Zika].”See also:Jul 29 Cell Rep studyJul 29 NIAID releaselast_img read more

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Dominica’s CCJ Accession Ceremony Today

first_img National Coordinating Committee chairman denies public… In a Statement in the run-up to today’event, the CCJ President said the Court welcomed Dominica’s historic move and was ready to  become the final court of appeal to  the country’speople. “While being accessed by only three other Caribbean States, the CCJ’s Appellate Jurisdiction is quite robust as it has produced close to ninety percent of the Court’s judicial output. With ten years already on its heels, the CCJ stands ready to serve the people of Dominica in providing greater accessibility to final justice in a manner that engenders the public’s thrust and confidence in judicial services,” Sir Denis said in his statement. Today’s accession ceremony will be streamed live at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tyhsp2-Kj4M [su_box title=”The Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ)” style=”soft” box_color=”#54c0f0″]The CCJ was inaugurated on 16 April, 2005 in Trinidad and Tobago where it is headquartered. Its central role is providing legal certainty to the operations of the CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME). It is structured to have two jurisdictions – an original and an appellate. In its original jurisdiction it ensures uniform interpretation and application of the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas, thereby underpinning and advancing the CARICOM Single Market and Economy. As the final court of appeal for Member States of the Caribbean Community it fosters the development of an indigenous Caribbean jurisprudence[/su_box] Jun 19, 2019 Jun 11, 2020 Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… Oct 3, 2018 COVID-19: CCJ takes safety measures CCJ Upholds COTED Decision on Cement Tariff Increase Dominica’s CCJ Accession Ceremony – in photosThere was a mood of celebration in Roseau Friday during an official ceremony to mark Dominica’s replacement of the London-based Privy Council with the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) as its final Court of Appeal. Dominica became the fourth country to accede to  the CCJ’s appellate jurisdiction, joining Barbados, Guyana…March 6, 2015In “CARICOM”Dominica accedes to CCJ Appellate jurisdiction tomorrow; event to be live-streamedRoseau, Dominica -The ceremony to mark Dominica’s accession to the appellate jurisdiction of the Caribbean Court of Justice is set for Friday, March 6, 2015. The ceremony will begin from 10:00am and will be held at the State House Conference Centre. President of Dominica H.E. Charles A Savarin, Prime Minister…March 5, 2015In “Barbados”CCJ welcomes Dominica’s historic moveFurther to the recent announcement made by The Honourable Roosevelt Skerrit, Prime Minister of Dominica, the President of the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ), The Right Honourable Sir Charles Michael Dennis Byron, has issued the following statement: The Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) has noted the announcement by the Honourable Mr. Roosevelt Skerrit, Prime…January 28, 2015In “CARICOM”Share this on WhatsApp Mar 18, 2020 You may be interested in… President of the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) Rt. Hon. Sir Denis Byron President of the Caribbean Court of Justice Rt. Hon. Sir Dennis Byron and other Judges of the Court will attend the ceremony to mark the accession of the Commonwealth of Dominica to the Appellate Jurisdiction of the CCJ today, Friday 6 March 2015. CARICOM Secretary-General Ambassador Irwin LaRocque will also attend the Ceremony which will be held at the Dominica State House Conference Centre at Roseau, from 10:00 am. CARICOM Secretary-General meets Guyana’s President last_img read more

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A fight over rights of Light

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