CANADIAN ACTOR ENTERS 40TH YEAR EMERGING ARTIST

first_imgAdvertisement TORONTO – Canada’s film and theatre industries came together yesterday in celebration as Kenneth Barnes, a 60-year-old veteran actor with hundreds of plays, tv shows, and films under his belt, proudly announced that after four decades of hard work, he had officially been honoured with Canada’s prestigious “Best Up-And-Coming Emerging Artist” award.Barnes, a recipient of five Dora Awards, two Canadian Screen Awards, and even a Canadian Comedy Award nomination, proclaimed that if the past forty years have taught him anything, it’s to never give up on your dreams of someday being recognized as “that guy from the Canadian Tire Mop commercial”.“I feel really lucky to have the title at all in such a tough industry,” said Barnes, sitting in the two bedroom apartment he shares with seven other actors. Advertisement Twitter Facebookcenter_img Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisementlast_img read more

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Samson Cree Nation wants gang members booted

first_imgAPTN National NewsLeaders on the Samson Cree Nation in Alberta are struggling with a resurgence of gun violence in their community that has taken yet another life.In the past decade, the First Nation’s town site, known as Hobbema, has become synonymous with gang shootings.With this latest death, the community is trying to turn that around once and for all.APTN National News reporter Noemi LoPinto has the details.last_img

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RCMP release operational overview of violence against Aboriginal women

first_imgAPTN National NewsDrums sounded outside RCMP headquarters in Winnipeg while inside investigators were releasing details and painting a bleak picture of the violence First Nations, Metis and Inuit women have faced for more than three decades.The number, 1,181, has been known for more than two weeks when RCMP commissioner Bob Paulson was asked about the issue by reporters after he testified before a parliamentary committee. But today’s detailed description of the violence Aboriginal women have faced between 1980 to 2012 was moved away from the national media spotlight in Ottawa to Winnipeg and Paulson did not attend.“This report is the most comprehensive data set ever compiled by police on missing and murdered Indigenous women, said Deputy Commissioner Janice Armstrong, of the RCMP’s contract and Aboriginal policing branch.As expected, the report reveals that Aboriginal women in Canada are more likely to die a violent death than non-Aboriginal women, usually at the hands of someone they know. While Aboriginal women only make up 4.3 percent of the population, they account for 16 per cent of female homicide and 11.3 percent of missing women in Canada.“The issue of missing and murdered Indigenous women is a societal problem that needs a much larger approach from all corners of society, said Armstrong.RCMP Operational Overview:Among the first major pieces of research on this issue came from the Native Women’s Association of Canada’s program, called Sisters in Spirit. Its funding was eventually cut by the Harper government but not before researchers documented 582 cases of Aboriginal women who were either murdered or had gone missing. This study, however, ordered by Paulson, canvassed police forces from across the country, looked into the 582 cases and found many more waiting for them.“The purpose of the review was to validate the research previously done on this topic. It’s the first time all police across the country have cooperated,” said Supt. Tyler Bates, director of national Aboriginal policing and crime prevention services.Reaction, both from families and politicians was immediate.“I’m a little discouraged,” said Bernadette Smith, sister of Claudette Osborne, a 21-year-old Winnipeg girl who vanished in 2008. “There’s not a lot of tangible action in the report, you know in terms of how they’re going to work with communities, how they’re going to repair the relationship and the distrust that’s been created. We need more proactive strategies. How are we going to stop this from continuing to happen?”Police say this information would be used to create strategies to combat violence in communities across the country. But the senior RCMP officers speaking to the media would not comment on whether the report should lead to a national inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women. When asked if the RCMP now feel they have all the answers they need to understand the issue, Deputy Commissioner Armstrong acknowledged,  “I don’t think we have the answers we need, no.”  “Important questions still need to be answered.” She said.  Armstrong later added that the questions of a national inquiry are “not for the police” to answer.Friday is a lonely place on parliament hill. Most MP’s are travelling home and rarely are ministers available to comment. But there was some reaction from both sides of the political spectrum.Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt, the minister responsible for First Nations, Metis and Inuit people in Canada, was not speaking on the issue nor did his office issue a statement. According to a spokesperson in Valcourt’s office, Justice minister Peter McKay was taking the lead. In a statement from his office to media shortly after the report was released, Mckay says the report is proof there is no need for a national inquiry.“This comprehensive study will help further inform the actions the government is taking in our efforts to keep our streets and communities safe. Some 40 studies have already been completed over the years dealing with the issue of missing and murdered Aboriginal women. We must continue to take concrete action now, not just continue to study the issue,” he said.But opposition parties in Ottawa see the report in a different way.“Today’s report clarifies both the shocking scope of the crisis of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Canada, and the fact that this crisis has gotten dramatically worse over time,” said Carolyn Bennett, Aboriginal Affairs critic for the Liberal party. “The only way to put an end to this national tragedy and find justice for its victims is to call a full national public inquiry and to do so immediately.”And the official opposition NDP says police must do more than study the issue.“I think the RCMP statement that action has to be taken on prevention is an important one because we want to prevent these crimes in the first place,” said Jean Crowder, Aboriginal Affairs critic. “The status quo isn’t working and we need to take extraordinary measures to address the crisis of missing and murdered Indigenous women.”The Data:•  Police-recorded incidents of Aboriginal female homicides and unresolved missing Aboriginal females in this review total 1,181 – 164 missing and 1,017 homicide victims.•  There are 225 unsolved cases of either missing or murdered Aboriginal females: 105 missing for more than 30 days as of November 4, 2013, whose cause of disappearance was categorized at the time as “unknown” or “foul play suspected” and 120 unsolved homicides between 1980 and 2012.• The total indicates that Aboriginal women are over-represented among Canada’s murdered and missing women.• There are similarities across all female homicides. Most homicides were committed by men and most of the perpetrators knew their victims, whether as an acquaintance or a spouse.Many have long held that police lacked the will to solve many of these crimes. But according to the data, crimes against First Nation, Metis and Inuit women are solved at close to the same rate as the national average. Police forces across Canada reported solving 88 percent of Aboriginal female homicides since 1980, and 89 percent of other cases.But Amnesty International questions the accuracy of the data.“The report acknowledges that the reported numbers of unresolved cases of missing Indigenous women and girls may not be accurate for this reason,” said Alex Neve. “Among homicides, the RCMP claims to have successfully resolved the question of Indigenous identity in almost all the cases where this identity was previously recorded as unknown. However, there is still considerable potential that some Indigenous victims have been mistakenly identified as non-Indigenous.”Who are the perpetrators in these violent cases against Aboriginal women? The report states that in only eight percent of the cases was the killer a stranger. Instead, they were killed by a spouse or aquaintance, someone who had a past criminal record, on social assistance, and/or had a history of family violence. Aboriginal female victims of homicide themselves are more likely to have criminal records, have no employment and to have consumed intoxicants before their death.“There are certain vulnerabilities, socially and economically, that make Aboriginal women at risk, said Supt. Bates.The next steps in addressing issues in this report include enhancing efforts on unresolved cases, focusing on prevention methods and increasing public awareness.“Police are only one part of the solution. Society must become engaged in addressing the problem,” said Deputy Commissioner Armstrong.@aptnnewslast_img read more

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Two teenagers killed and two children among injured in threecar crash on

first_imgTwo teenagers have died and two children are among seven injured after a three-car crash on the A61.North Yorkshire Police said a black Ford Focus, a black Vauxhall Corsa and a green Volkswagen Bora were involved in the collision near Thirsk on Wednesday at around 9.25pm.The boys, believed to be 17, died at the scene and five adults and two children were taken to hospital.Officers said they believed the vehicles were travelling from Thirsk to Busby Stoop – and are appealing for anyone with information or dash-cam footage to get in touch.A stretch of the road between Busby Stoop and Carlton Minniott was closed while the scene was examined, but North Yorkshire Police said it reopened at 4.45am. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Anyone with information is asked to call police on 101 quoting incident 12180039673.last_img read more

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IPL and PSL owners snap up South Africa franchises

Two South African businessmen, two IPL franchises, two PSL franchises, and representatives from Hong Kong and Dubai were unveiled as the owners of the eight teams in South Africa’s T20 Global League. The owners, the cities and their marquee players were unveiled at an event in London on Monday.Durban, Benoni, Pretoria, Stellenbosch, Cape Town, Bloemfontein, Johannesburg and Port Elizabeth will each host a franchise, which left no room for the likes of Kimberley, East London and Potchefstroom, who host franchise cricket. The Stellenbosch franchise will likely play at Boland Park in Paarl.International buyers own three-quarters of the franchises with the biggest name being Shah Rukh Khan. The Bollywood superstar added to his Knight Riders brand with the purchase of the Cape Town franchise to add to teams in Kolkata and Trinidad. There was also a second IPL influence. The Delhi Daredevils’ holding company GMR sports bought the Johannesburg franchise.The two South African-owned franchises are based in Pretoria and Stellenbosch and run by South African businessman Osman Osman, who owns a lifestyle brand, and Brimstone, a company owned by Mushtaq Brey.Two PSL owners, Fawad Rana of the Lahore Qalandar, and Javed Afridi from the Peshawar Zalmi, bought franchises in Durban and Benoni respectively while the Bloemfontein franchise was bought by Hong-Kong’s Sushil Kumar and the Port Elizabeth team by Dubai’s Ajay Sethi. Both have previous involvement in cricket, Kumar owns a Hong Kong franchise while Sethi is involved at Channel 2 in the UAE.CSA also unveiled eight ambassadors, all former South African national players: Graeme Smith, Andrew Hall, Ashwell Prince, Herschelle Gibbs, Paul Adams, Allan Donald, Andrew Hudson and Paul Harris.Despite no Indian players being available for the tournament, its overlap with the BPL, the chances of Australian players being scant given the clash with their summer and the ECB’s refusal for Eoin Morgan and Jason Roy to attend the launch, CSA president Chris Nenzani was hopeful the competition would receive global support.“We thank all other cricket boards and we hope that they will support this venture in the manner that we have helped and supported their leagues. We hope they will help us to make it a success,” he said.More than 400 players have registered their interest with a draft scheduled for August. (ESPNCricinfo) Firdose Moonda is ESPNcricinfo’s South Africa correspondent Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedIPL auction to be held on January 27, 28December 20, 2017In “Sports”De Villiers, Rabada, du Plessis among marquee players for Mzansi Super LeagueOctober 15, 2018In “Sports”IPL 2019 to be played entirely in India, will begin on March 23January 8, 2019In “Sports” read more

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Column I thought I was just trying to beat depression in a

first_imgAlan O’Mara is a successful GAA player. He was the Cavan goalkeeper during the 2011 U21 campaign – the team won the Ulster Championship and reached the All-Ireland final – and is currently on the county’s senior football panel. Yesterday, he published an article on the GAA’s website entitled Living with Depression: A Footballer’s Story. It is reproduced here, in full, with his kind permission. The 22-year-old says he penned his personal story to encourage others going through a similar nightmare to reach out and ask for support. I AM AN Ulster champion. I am an Ulster champion, I tell myself again. I know I should be confident.I know I should feel privileged after winning a provincial title earlier in 2011 but I don’t. I feel terrible and I can’t sleep anymore. Night after night I lie in bed staring at the ceiling; questioning my existence. I question the GAA too and I wonder why I give the commitment I do.My drive and focus have left me. My weekly dose of adrenaline and satisfaction is gone. Playing football used to make me feel ten feet tall but that all seems a distant memory now. I have come to dread a sport I once adored. My life feels pointless.It’s three days after Christmas in 2011 and I am gazing at the flickering flame in the fireplace at my family home. It’s comforting. I can feel the heat rising out from the fire and hitting me in the face. I look at our tree, the gifts I have, the endless food nearby and I’m telling myself I don’t want to go to a two-day training camp with my college, DIT.There is a voice in my head telling me to stay right where I am. It tells me I hate football. Despite this internal conversation I force myself off the couch, pack my bag full of waterproof gear, boots, gloves, towels and get into my car. Football is the Grinch to my Christmas right now but I know I am obliged to be present. Despite ongoing injuries and niggling pains, I train that night.The pitch we are slogging away on is barely lit. We rely on the floodlights from the astro-turf pitch running perpendicular behind the goal to light up the area where we are working. I’m standing in the middle of a puddle and although I am there in body, I don’t feel there in mind or spirit. The feeble light flickering its way through the net and railings reminds me of the warm comforting fire at home.My mind is away in the clouds, wondering why football is not enjoyable to me anymore. That little voice is whispering in my ear again; asking me what the hell I am doing here. It has asked me that question so many times recently. Still no answer.After training I stay with a team-mate. I am dosed in negativity. It is manipulating my thoughts and that night I spend my time moaning about a sport I had always adored. I am completely and utterly disillusioned with football. Eventually, after being blitzed with all my pessimism, mixed with some recollection of fond old memories of playing football together for Cavan and DIT, we decide it’s time to hit the hay because we have a challenge match in the morning.After he showed me to my quarters for the night he went into his room, shut his door and I presume he nodded off to sleep like any normal person.Me? I took a sleeping tablet but even that didn’t knock me out. Altogether that night I got three hours of sleep. I’m taking sleeping tablets and I still can’t sleep. I mean, what the hell is wrong with me? This has been happening nightly for a while now so I came prepared for my insomnia, on this occasion in an unfamiliar house. I stay up reading Olympic boxer Kenny Egan’s book in the hope that it might distract the hushed whispers in my head enough so that I will be able to get to sleep.Tiredness gradually descends upon me and my eyes get heavy so I turn off the bedside lamp and close them, desperately hoping to get some much needed sleep. It’s a complete waste of time. Thought after thought races around my head. After switching to my iPod I eventually dose off but by 7am I’m wide awake again. That voice is talking to me once more.I glance around the room to see if there is a TV; no joy. My head falls back into the pillows. I lie there staring at an unfamiliar ceiling; thinking, questioning and wondering about everything in my life. Football, my prolonged struggle with injuries, the death of a loved one, love in general, money, and all else that goes with it.The voice in my head on this morning focuses on how every game I have played since losing the biggest game of my career has seemed a massive anti-climax to me. It tells me football is the reason for my unhappiness. That march to the 2011 All-Ireland under 21 final in Croke Park , the adventure of a lifetime with a special bunch of players, seems a lifetime ago.©INPHO/Cathal NoonanFor some reason nothing has been able to match the feelings I had playing on that team. Maybe I was too emotionally attached to it; maybe I invested too much energy, physically and mentally. It was the first thing I thought of when I woke up and the last thing that crossed my mind before I went to sleep. My dreams were often about that team.The problem is I have not been able to match the feeling and satisfaction it brought me. It’s like being taken to Disneyland as a child and being allowed to go on the most dangerous and thrilling ride only to be told after just one go that you have to stay on the bumper cars from now on. I was lucky enough to experience that rush, that extreme high and I thought nothing else could compare to it.All of a sudden the conversation in my head is interrupted by a knock on the door to wake me up for this game on a miserable winter morning by my good friend. Little does he know.An important journeyThree hours of sleep and a game of football later I am driving home on the motorway. This is a mundane, boring and soulless road. Its markings flash by in a blur. Now I am simply staring into space and thinking about how I’ve just played the majority of a challenge match with tears in the back of my eyes. I ask myself what the hell is happening to me and why I am feeling like this? I tell myself to pull it together and snap out of it but I can’t change my train of thought. It’s negative. So, my morning replays in my brain once more as the road continues to whizz by in a monotonous blur.I hate myself for making me go to this challenge match when I could have stayed by the fire at home. I remember being younger, when all I wanted to do was play sport. I would spend my days jumping and diving on the concrete paths. When the call came from my parents to come in for the evening I had a sponge ball in my house and I jumped around after it on beds, on couches, on carpets and on wooden floors. I would commentate to myself, always so happy in my own little world. Back then the voice in my head was a far more innocent and positive friend to have around; we would dream of stopping goals in big stadiums some day.The challenge game on this December morning couldn’t have been any further from that innocent and inspiring place I imagined myself to be in my youth. All I remember was looking at the deteriorated surface around me wishing for a hole to open up and swallow me. Anything to get me out of the living hell I found myself in. This was as far from that exhilarating rollercoaster I had ever felt.That’s the conversation I am having in my head as I am driving home. There is nothing to catch my attention on this road; nothing to distract my brain. It’s just me in the car, me and the voice that has become more and more prominent lately. It is getting louder. It gets to the point where it muffles out the radio. I keep driving. I keep thinking, questioning and wondering. How have I got to this point? The point where there is even a thought of swerving my car into the concrete wall on the side of the motorway.I feel trapped; it’s just me and that voice in the fast lane of a motorway. Deep down, somewhere, I’m aware that is not a good mix. The concrete wall to my right looks so appealing. How easy it would be just to swerve into it and finish it all. The voice whispers in my ear: ‘Will anybody even care if I do it?’ The visualisation of my parents at my funeral rescues me from this horrible train of thought. I wind the window down and let the crisp air hit my face.Eventually I get home and I want to switch off. I’m tired, I’m cranky and I’ve had a realisation that I am depressed.A week after a chat with my GP and my prescription for sleeping tablets, a read of Kenny Egan’s book, the experience of playing a game of football with tears in my eyes and an hour-long conversation with myself in the car and it finally sinks in. At least that miserable drive was good for something.Playing with DIT. ©INPHO/Donall FarmerLike most mothers, mine has that special talent of immediately sensing when something is wrong so when I get home, she asks. I say “nothing”. She knows I haven’t really been sleeping, I told her that much, but I’m not me right now. I’m a pale shadow of me and she knows. She asks again. I try to convince her I’m just tired but she knows I’m lying. Mothers always know.Now she is standing over me on the couch while I lie there with headphones over my ears and my hood pulled up. I try to pretend I am listening to them but she knows. Then she asks me if I am feeling depressed? Eerie, creepy silence invades the room. Should I lie?What excuse can I give? All these thoughts are flying through my brain at a hundred miles an hour. My head has been swirling like this regularly. Sod it, what have I to lose. Look at the state of me. I swallow the lump in my throat, hold back the tears in my eyes and cough up something that sounded like “yes”.She asks what is going on with me and what is getting me down but I don’t open up. I still don’t fully understand the whole process myself and why I feel like this. I head to my room to try and make sense of how I have reached the miserably low point of suicidal thoughts entering my brain. More thinking, more questioning and wondering but still no definitive answers.***It’s March 2012 and I’m back on the same couch. I have tears in my eyes again. Two or three times earlier that evening I swallowed the lump in my throat and closed my eyes waiting for it to pass like it had done over the previous few weeks but it didn’t seem to want to go anywhere this time. Something was different.Conversation would temporarily distract my tired brain but each time silence, other than the TV, spread around the room, thoughts start bouncing around my head at a frightening pace. We, my brain and I, have been doing this for months now. Talking to ourselves and questioning my existence. I felt like the Smeagol/Gollum creature from the Lord of the Rings series. Two voices within one person constantly debating and arguing.The waves of emotion keep churning internally so I remove myself from the room pretending to be shattered and head for the sanctuary of my bedroom. I turn off the light and get into bed. I had been warned that this moment was going to arrive. My GPA counsellor, who I had been seeing on a fortnightly basis since January, told me this was going to happen as part of my healing process. As my depression would lift my body would need to offload emotions.The best thing I ever did was call the GPA counselling service. Twice before I had sat alone with the number typed into my phone but I just couldn’t find the courage to push the green button. Who is on the other end of the line? Will he think I am making a fuss over nothing?I was lucky enough that the service was free for me and, ironically, the clinic was based on the road where I was living. On the day I was first due to go to a ‘session’ my body shook with anxiety at the mere thought of opening up to a stranger. Part of me wanted to reach out for help but the other strand saw the solution as getting back into bed, pulling the pillow over my head and waiting for all my problems to go away.Cavan’s Colm Smith, goalkeeper Alan O’Mara, Jack Brady and Sean Gaffney dejected at the end of a game in 2011. ©INPHO/James CrombieI spent so much time in my bedroom my friends called it the ‘Batcave’. Day after day I was just lying there on Facebook and Twitter doing nothing, eating crisps and sweets instead of cooking food. I don’t remember when or how the negative voice in my head became so prominent, but my brain became poisoned and I needed help.As I lie in my bed on this March night I think about what he said to me over our sessions and playback the conversations in my head. I see the jar he drew in a box of sand beside the desk where we sat. I see the first line he drew towards the bottom of the jar — the point where a normal person’s emotional content is meant to be. Then I can see my level a few inches above it, worryingly close to the brim.We have talked about a lot in our sessions, and this races through my head now. My grandfather dying and how it inflicted a sense of loss that I had never really experienced before. My diminishing relationship with football and how I gradually sank deeper and deeper into a state of depression after losing that All-Ireland under 21 final in Croke Park. That journey was the happiest time of my life. I invested so much time, energy and thought into it and truly felt part of a team; a family. It’s a special feeling.Filling the voidFor some reason, playing with other teams failed to fill the void I was feeling. Football became a chore and I think my consistent struggles with injuries played a part in that. They were intrinsically linked. Luckily I had a job I loved. The brilliant thing about work was that it gave me responsibility and accountability.Things really spiralled downhill when that work came to an end. My energy levels declined and I rarely left the house. For a while the only thing I enjoyed was drinking but then the nature of the hangovers began to change. Sometimes I would just drink again to get rid of them. A temporary illumination of the dark mood I found myself in.The alcohol began to affect my train of thought. Normally a feed of drink brings a sudden high which lulls you into a false sense of happiness but that changed with me. One night while out, I found myself sitting on the lid of a toilet in a Dublin nightclub hiding from the world. Laughter and conversation filled my ears from the outside, while on the inside my eyes filled with tears and my head filled with negative and self-conscious thoughts. I sat there trying not to cry.On top of all this I think about love, my family, work, college and how it bores me, and my life in general; the point of my existence.Life without footballFor the first session, I walked into the room with the intention of telling this stranger that I hated football and that anything going wrong in my life was its fault. A few weeks down the line, with the help the GPA service provided, I could see that wasn’t actually the case and I just wanted to be able to get out of bed in the morning and see the pleasure in life again.I decided to try life without football and stopped playing for Cavan and my club, Bailieborough Shamrocks, after I was knocked out of the Sigerson Cup with DIT. I no longer wanted to be a pitiful human who passed day after day lying in bed. I yearned to be happy, confident and outgoing again.As I lie in my bed reflecting on all this a tear makes the breakthrough from my right eye and begins to trickle to my neck. That sole tear is soon followed by another one on the opposite side of my face but this one decides to linger somewhere between my lip and ear. I lie flat on my back trying to relax the frame of my body.I feel like I want to cry. I know I need to. But for some reason I can’t. Am I imagining all this I ask myself? Is it all in my head? If the tears aren’t coming, well then maybe I just think I am depressed. Is this all just a figment of my imagination? Have I just been fooling myself over the past few months and giving myself a reason for losing my drive and appetite to succeed in life? Gollum and Smeagol are at it again. I search for a distraction. My bedroom is dark.Night has descended but my eyes have adjusted to the surroundings and I can make out things that I couldn’t a few minutes ago. I can see my light-blue curtains and the outline of my television with a blue dot shining from the surface to signify it is on standby. I wipe the tear away that has been clinging to my cheek and think the worst of this peculiar mood is over. Is this it? I ask myself. Is that all you can muster?Then my eyes fill up again. This time I roll onto my side and curl up into the foetal position. I pull a pillow out from underneath my head and draw it close to my chest. At that moment I could almost feel the jar physically shatter within my gut.Tears start oozing out of my eyes and roll down my face like raindrops on a window pane. The feeling they create whilst touching my skin is unnatural. My stomach contracts as if more of my contained emotions are being forced up through capillary action towards the exit point. Memory by memory and emotion by emotion they climb.I hear movement in the next room so I bite down on my duvet to smother the sobbing noises. Tears are flowing freely down my cheeks and I can’t breathe through my nose anymore as it is completely blocked with slimy snots. No cold or ’flu ever created this stuff.My phone vibrates with a message but as I go to press the buttons I am trembling. My eyes are blurred and I struggle to make out the text on the screen. I toss the phone somewhere into the darkness and return to my curled up position. I am not going to fight this anymore.Once or twice I thought I was done, wiped my face and blew my nose only for another wave to ooze out. About 30 minutes after I entered my bedroom I lie with my head in a wet and bogey-ridden pillow. I had been warned that at some stage I may erupt into tears for no apparent reason but I don’t think I really believed my counsellor when he said that to me. Thankfully for me, however, it happened in my own bedroom where I could have this private and important moment. Nobody has a clue what I have just done.It dawns on me that before I went upstairs I sat listening to Niall Quinn, the former Republic of Ireland striker, tell Ryan Tubridy about his experience with a mental health problem. Perhaps, that was my trigger or maybe it was going to a Cavan match for the first time in 2012, standing on the terrace feeling completely detached from the team.All the time I am thinking about this dark spell of my life. I can see the light though, literally, as a ray of light meanders its way through the bedroom door frame and into my line of vision.DIT’s Alan O’Mara is treated for cramp in January 2012. ©INPHO/Lorraine O’SullivanDepression has reared its head in my life again since that March night. I have hit potholes; there have been one or two occasions when I found myself with tears at the back of my eyes whilst sitting at work.When I began my treatment, the biggest mistake I made was that I thought I was just trying to beat depression in a one-off fight. Me and Depression. Twelve rounds. When I delivered what I thought was the knockout punch and finally felt good again for the first time in months, I naively thought my fight was concluded.When depression stepped back into the ring for a second bout I was caught with my guard down. I wasn’t expecting it, but I’m glad I got taught that lesson.The difference now is I can identify when it is starting to hang over me thanks to the process I went through. I sense the dark cloud over my head. Normally my relapses have occurred after a session of binge drinking and, moving forward, I know I will have a wary relationship with alcohol.I also recognise my head physically feeling heavy, a lack of concentration and energy in my day-to-day life. When I sink low I get headaches that no amount of paracetamol can cure. They are at their worst in the mornings and will try to convince me to stay in bed.I returned to football for the 2013 season and it definitely helps me. On the few bad days I had, especially at the beginning, and then when I broke my arm in an Allianz League game, I could be driving to Cavan for training and subconsciously I’d start thinking of excuses, but I never once turned the car around.By the time I’d be completing the return trip I’d feel great. I’m certain that is to do with the post-exercise mood-enhancing endorphins that experts talk about. Football can be the cause of fluctuations in my moods, I suppose that’s the nature of competitive sport and investing your time, energy and emotions, but in general playing helps me keep these demons at bay. I love playing for Cavan. Having a job I love and daily structure helps me massively too.Living with depression and being happyThe key thing for anyone who is feeling depressed is to always remember there is light at the end of the tunnel. And if you ever get to a point where you are struggling to see it, like I did, then that is the moment to reach out for help. Opening the vault that had become my head was crucial in lifting my depression.I’m only 22 years of age but that dark spell has taught me so much about myself. Over the past two years I have felt depressed when actively involved with a football team and when I have been idle from GAA. I have experienced depression whilst in love and when single. It’s hung over me when living with friends and been there when staying with family. It has been there as a student and been there at work.The common denominator in all those things is me. What’s very easy to forget though is that I have also felt happy during most of those stages too.The Gaelic Players’ Association, working with the GAA, has operated a counselling service for players since 2010. This service includes access to experienced health professionals and, crucially, an urgent confidential counselling support line for players which is available 24/7, 365 days a year.Freephone Republic of Ireland 1800 201346 and from Northern Ireland dial 080 234 5183. Over 70 players have engaged with the service in the last three years.last_img read more

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iTunes Still Dominating Music Market

first_imgApple still controls 66.3 of the online music market, according to new numbers from analyst firm NPD. Amazon is in second place–a distant second at 13.3 percent of the market, all of this despite an aggressive push from sites like Amazon and Walmart.com to topple iTunes’ strangle hold on the industry.Among Amazon’s approaches are deep discounts on records, like the new album from Kayne West, which sold for $4.99 its first week–less than half of Apple’s asking price. Great for consumers, but artists seem less than enthused. The Wall Street Journal quotes the Fleet Foxes’ Twitter feed, “Been working for nine months on something that will sell for 3.99 on Amazon MP3. That’s about the price of a whoopie cushion.”AdChoices广告Yowtch.Apple actually managed to increase its market share in 2010, moving up from 63.2 percent. Amazon increased as well, moving up from 11 percent.last_img read more

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Megaupload data will be preserved for at least two more weeks

first_imgMegaupload users who had important files stored on the company’s servers may not be completely out of luck… yet. Last week a US District Attorney made headlines by stating that hosting companies may begin deleting the servers’ contents as early as this Thursday. But apparently Megaupload’s lawyers have been successful in delaying that process.Megaupload’s attorneys are apparently working with the US government to unfreeze some of the company’s assets, so that it can pay to recover the information on its servers. The hosting companies that hold Megaupload’s data, Cogent and Carpathia, have apparently been “very open to negotiating” to keep the data.Ira Rothken, Megaupload’s attorney, has an additional incentive to keep the site’s data: it could be evidence. He said that he hopes to use the data on the company’s servers as part of his defense.Though Megaupload stored tons of copyrighted content on its servers, it was used by millions of users for legitimate cloud storage purposes. The US government appears to be taking the approach that “this was a conspiracy to profit off of copyrighted content, so we don’t care if all of their content is deleted.” But if that’s the case, then what cloud storage provider couldn’t potentially be handled the same way? Dropbox is used by thousands of business and government officials. Do you think there is no copyrighted content stored on its servers? Granted, its employees haven’t been accused of encouraging — and profiting off of — infringement, but there are still many similarities.You could argue that Megaupload’s defense doesn’t stand a chance in US courts as a foreign business that was profiting off of copyrighted American content. Nonetheless, the trial could represent an important 21st century legal battleground. You can bet that, if nothing else, sites like Rapidshare, Hotfile, and Mediafire — and even Dropbox — will be watching closely.via Washington Postlast_img read more

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Le cerveau humain nest pas conçu pour effectuer plus de deux tâches

first_imgLe cerveau humain n’est pas conçu pour effectuer plus de deux tâches en même tempsFrance – Selon une étude publiée dans la revue Science et menée par des chercheurs français, le cerveau humain ne serait capable d’effectuer au maximum que deux tâches à la fois. Des chercheurs français ont mis en avant la dualité du cerveau humain. Lors d’une expérience menée sur trente-deux étudiants, il s’est avéré que gérer une ou deux tâches en même temps est accessible à tous mais qu’en revanche, à partir de trois tâches simultanées, les choses se compliquent considérablement.Le cerveau est divisé en deux hémisphères bien distincts, chacun pouvant se concentrer sur une tâche spécifique. Il s’agit là d’une limite infranchissable : le cerveau humain n’est donc capable d’effectuer que deux activités en même temps. Lors de l’expérience, l’activité cérébrale des étudiants a été analysée par IRM (imagerie par résonance magnétique). Avec la motivation d’un petit gain financier à chaque tâche effectuée, les étudiants étaient invités à reconnaître des séquences de lettres dans une série de lettres en désordre.L’IRM a montré que lorsqu’une seule tâche à la fois était requise, les deux zones frontales des deux hémisphères du cerveau étaient en activité. Puis, lorsque les volontaires devaient effectuer deux tâches, chaque hémisphère s’activait pour effectuer l’une des deux tâches, indépendamment l’un de l’autre. Le cerveau s’adaptait en quelques secondes, mettant en pause la première activité, qu’il reprenait ensuite très rapidement afin d’effectuer les deux activités en même temps de manière coordonnée.Par contre, lorsque la mise en œuvre d’une troisième tâche simultanément aux deux premières était nécessaire, le cerveau ne pouvait plus répondre correctement à la demande. Les erreurs se faisaient nombreuses et les volontaires étaient beaucoup moins rapides. Bon nombre d’entre eux ont dû mettre en pause l’une des trois activités, afin de pouvoir effectuer les deux autres correctement.À lire aussiUne activité électrique détectée dans des mini-cerveaux développés en laboratoireLe professeur Etienne Koechlin, qui avec Sylvain Charron est à l’origine de ce projet, explique : “Nous savons que les sujets ont des difficultés à décider au-delà de deux options et notre étude apporte une explication possible à notre tendance aux décisions binaires. Cela s’explique par la nature fondamentalement binaire de notre lobe frontal”.Cette étude aura également été l’occasion de remettre en cause une croyance sexiste selon laquelles les hommes seraient incapables d’effectuer plusieurs tâches en même temps : selon les chercheurs, “il n’y aucune différence entre les sexes concernant notre capacité à effectuer plusieurs tâches à la fois”.Le 19 avril 2010 à 12:23 • Emmanuel Perrinlast_img read more

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Le pavé dans la mare jeté par Free mobile fait des vagues

first_imgLe pavé dans la mare jeté par Free mobile fait des vaguesAprès un témoignage, hier, d’un journaliste infiltré chez Free Mobile et critiquant leur amateurisme, c’est au tour du PDG d’Orange d’apporter de l’eau au moulin anti-Free dans une interview surprenante accordée au journal Libération.Stephane Richard, le PDG d’Orange, chantre du capitaliste a déclaré à Libération (dans l’édition abonnée) que « l’idéologie de la concurrence peut être néfaste ». Curieuse idée (lien non disponible) pour le PDG d’une des plus grandes entreprises françaises.Selon lui, « on commence à comprendre que les conséquences de l’arrivée de Free Mobile vont être lourdes pour l’ensemble du secteur, que ce n’est pas juste une belle histoire soi-disant au profit du consommateur ».Il tire la sonnette d’alarme : « Free est un modèle disruptif (…). Personne ne peut dire qu’elles seront les conséquences ».   Mais bien entendu, ne souhaitant pas effrayer les actionnaires, il estime Orange bien armé pour se défendre. Son offre Sosh, notamment, compte désormais 200.000 abonnés. Par ailleurs, sur Investir.fr, il assure ne plus observer « de départs massifs de clients, nous sommes revenus à la normale avec environ 10.000 demandes par jour, comme avant l’arrivée de Free dans le mobile ».En même temps qu’il affirme des conséquences imprévisibles, il explique, paradoxalement, que tout est sous contrôle : Free « devrait représenter à terme, si l’on regarde ce qui s’est passé au Royaume-Uni, environ 15 % du marché. L’essentiel de la demande restera pour des mobiles subventionnés, segment sur lequel Free ne s’est pas encore positionné ».Hier, un journaliste anonyme publiait via Rue89 le témoignage de son infiltration pendant 3 mois chez Free. L’opérateur est décrit comme amateur, et la liste de ses défaillances techniques serait longue. À lire aussiForfait Free Mobile : heure d’appels doublée et SMS illimités pour 2 eurosStephane Richard approuve : « Le seul responsable de ces problèmes, c’est Free qui, lui, a sous-estimé l’effet de ses offres sur le marché ».La parole est désormais à la défense…Le 17 avril 2012 à 19:30 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

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Clark County charter effort draws 20 freeholder candidates so far

first_imgToday is the first day to file as a Clark County freeholder candidate, and at least 20 residents, many of them familiar political figures, have already thrown their hats in the ring. In all, 15 freeholders will be elected, and they will get the chance to write a charter for Clark County. The so-called home-rule charter would allow the county to be governed by its own set of rules, as long as those rules don’t conflict with the U.S. or Washington state constitutions. Here’s who has filed so far: District 1, Position 1: Garry Lucas District 1, Position 2: Ann Rivers District 1, Position 5: Randy Mueller District 2, Position 2: Lloyd Halverson and Debbie AbrahamDistrict 2, Position 3: Judie StantonDistrict 2, Position 4: Paul DennisDistrict 3, Position 1: Pat Jollota, Michael Heywood and Sunrise O’Mahoney District 3, Position 2: Val Ogden, Rob Figley and Paul HarrisDistrict 3, Position 3: Jim Moeller, Maureen Andrade, Bruce Samuelson and Jerry KeenDistrict 3, Position 4: Temple Lentz and Dan BarnesDistrict 3, Position 5: Jim MainsFreeholders can propose a number of changes to county governance, including increasing the number of commissioners who serve Clark County or creating a binding code of ethics for elected officials. Whatever charter they create must be approved by the voters.The filing period for Clark County freeholder candidates ends 5 p.m. Friday. Candidates must be registered to vote, and they have to have been residents of Clark County for at least five years. The list of candidates who have filed to run in the Nov. 5 election is available on the Clark County website. Freeholder positions are nonpartisan, and terms last up to one year.This story will be updated.last_img read more

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How can data from group risk products help form a strategy

first_imgHR and benefits professionals are coming under increasing pressure to make better use of big data and analytics in order to make better decisions in areas such as talent, reward and engagement. However, many industry experts believe that organisations are missing a trick in failing to make the most of their benefits data to better understand their population risks and develop a more effective group risk strategy.Connect the dataGroup risk protection products include life assurance, critical illness insurance and income protection, benefits that, in addition to financial protection, provide additional support services, such as employee assistance programmes (EAPs), absence management, online health assessments, mental-health first-aid training, and access to counselling and physiotherapy.They are also a rich source of data that can be collated and used to improve workplace wellness strategies and cut costs, yet many organisations are failing to make that connection.Matthew Lawrence, head of broking and health and risk proposition at Aon Employee Benefits, says: “In our recent Benefits and trends survey [published in November 2015], nearly 40% of employers did not use any data analytics to inform or drive their corporate health and wellbeing approach. Where data was used, just over a quarter used medical, income protection, life and/or critical illness data to drive decisions.”Examples of the data sets that employers often have access to include absence data, occupational health data, claims data from medical, life, income protection and/or critical illness schemes and data from EAP services usage.Effective use of this data can help to identify any problem areas, and also highlight what is working well, which can influence costs, says Katharine Moxham, spokesperson for industry body Group Risk Development (Grid). “If a manufacturing [organisation], for example, has a very good health and safety record, it should be sharing that with its group risk provider,” she says. “If an [organisation] has good EAP usage, [it should] share it with [its] group risk provider.”Benchmark risk areasThe data can also be used for benchmarking key areas of group risk. Paul Avis, marketing director at Canada Life Group Risk, says: “With aggregated data drawn from health risk assessments, [employers] have a line in the sand, whether [they] are looking at health issues relating to obesity, heart disease, cancer or stress. Once it is benchmarked [they] can see, for example, how calls to [the] EAP services are affected.”Providers can also help employers make best use of their data by benchmarking to show how their rates of sickness absence, or even specific health issues in the workplace, compare with others in the sector.Address sickness absenceThe availability of data is also encouraging employers to consider offering wider group risk benefits to staff to help reduce sickness absence. Leighton Churchill, corporate account manager at Jelf Employee Benefits, says: “By implementing these benefits and actively participating and adhering to the early intervention and rehabilitation services that insurers provide with the contracts, employers are beginning to see the benefits of a healthier workforce leading to improved productivity and staff morale.”One of the challenges employers face is knowing how to use the various data sets they have to best understand their employee health risks and truly integrate their health and benefits strategy. The key to this is to involve the group risk providers and make it a collaborative exercise, says Avis. “In the first instance [employers] need to get all [their] group risk providers to agree on how they will report back on their data,” he adds. “[They] then need to bring them all together to share their data sets. A lot of benefits advisers have developed databases that can pull this data into a health board very effectively.”To produce good data, employers need to have the right tools and the infrastructure in place to record it accurately, and more organisations are recognising this, says Andrew Potterton, head of proposition development at Unum UK. Where they struggle is in maintaining consistent reporting among their line managers. “It is important to provide line managers with training in workforce wellbeing to engender employee trust and ensure consistent reporting practices,” Potterton explains.Making best use of data to join together all of the facets of wellness, including financial protection, delivers tangible advantages for both employers and employees. Understanding the root causes of poor employee health, and making improvements to it requires a truly integrated approach. “That should be an employer’s objective,” adds Lawrence. “Experience suggests that taking a piecemeal approach often delivers less benefit for the business than might be expected.”Oracle uses group risk data to inform wellbeing strategyAt technology firm Oracle, the use of data is key to enhancing group risk provision for the organisation and boosting the benefits and workplace wellbeing strategy for its UK employees.Michelle Bradshaw, compensation and benefits director UK, Ireland and Israel, says: “The data that can be drawn from things [such as] income protection claims, the take-up of certain benefits, and our sickness absence rates enables us to be much more strategic. For example, from a risk point of view, given that most group income protection claims are cancer-related, we decided to target the issue of male cancer through workplace campaigns, which breaks down the stigma that surrounds the subject and also raises awareness of the importance of early detection and intervention.”The organisation’s effective use of data relies on the input of all of Oracle’s health-related benefits providers, including providers of the employee assistance programme (EAP), life assurance, group income protection and critical illness benefits, which Bradshaw invites to get together on a quarterly basis to analyse the data.Bradshaw adds: “As well as helping to improve long-term sickness management policies and offer a more focused wellbeing offering, we can use the data to work out which benefits our employees want, whether [this is] income protection or life assurance, and by incorporating choice and flexibility into the offering, make those benefits available to them at a cost level that suits them.” Need to know:Data can be used for internal and external benchmarking, which can identify strengths and weaknesses in a group risk strategy.Line management training in workplace wellbeing is key to accurate sickness absence data reporting and analysis.A collaborative and integrated approach to data analysis, involving all group risk providers, will deliver the most effective group risk strategy.last_img read more

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Endangered Indian rhino at Zoo Miami is pregnant

first_imgShe was born at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park in January 2012 and arrived at Zoo Miami in December 2015.This is her first pregnancy.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. SOUTHWEST MIAMI-DADE, FLA. (WSVN) – A rare endangered rhinoceros at Zoo Miami is now eating for two.The zoo announced that 6-year-old one-horned rhino Akuti is pregnant.Akuti is an endangered Indian rhino, whose breed is usually hunted for their horn.The baby was achieved through artificial insemination in January.Staff members brought equipment to do an ultrasound and get a good look at her baby’s beating heart, Wednesday.If Akuti can successfully bring the pregnancy to term, it will be the first rhino to be born in the United States through artificial insemination.Akuti is expected to give birth sometime in April 2019. last_img read more

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Taxi driver OK after being trapped under semitruck on I95 in NE

first_imgNORTHEAST MIAMI-DADE, FLA. (WSVN) – A South Florida cabbie is counting his blessings after his car ended up under a semi-truck along Interstate 95 in Northeast Miami-Dade, trapping him inside.Cellphone video captured half the victim’s vehicle lodged under the big rig along the northbound lanes near the Ives Dairy Road exit, Thursday night.Florida Highway Patrol troopers and Miami-Dade Fire Rescue units responded to the scene of the crash, just after 7 p.m.Troopers were able to pull the taxi driver out of his car.Officials said everyone involved in the crash is OK.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img

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National Journals Membership Model Gains 600 Members

first_imgIn August, Atlantic Media’s National Journal Group outlined a new membership service to its existing subscribers, hoping to gain loyalty in the ever-competitive realm of Washingtonian journalism. After months of personal outreach to potential partners, National Journal says it has roughly 600 paid members on board with the enterprise service, which was designed to replace struggling individual subscriptions. “What we found was that our journalism is not best served by slicing it up, as some people had access to some things and not others. All of our news now is interlocking: We have the weekly magazine; we have the daily congressional publication, we have the website; the Hotline (which is an online-only subscription for political coverage),” says Taylor West, communications director with National Journal. “We want National Journal members to feel this is an organization at their service, with the information they need and in the form that they need it.”While West declined to share membership fees, she says pricing is decided through a sliding scale based on number of employees. In order to create a comprehensive content offering, the membership also includes The Executive Insight Briefing, a weekly news round up available on National Journal’s website for download. The briefing is customizable through content addition or subtraction, as well as logo integration options. There is a presentation center housing charts, infographics and stats accessible for members as well. Member services extend to live events, with the National Journal Group holding monthly Charter Membership meetings at The Watergate in Washington, D.C. Poppy MacDonald, vice president of membership with the Atlantic Media Company, talks about the advantages of these face-to-face meetings, “Members appreciate the insight they’re getting from our journalism, but they also want to hear from each other.”MacDonald details this week’s Charter meeting, which will focus on the Affordable Care Act, “117 people have RSVPed for the event. We’re only going to spend 12 minutes going through a PowerPoint presentation for them to use to educate their constituency, to outline possible outcomes and what it all means. We’ll then let the heads of the participating offices talk about what they’re planning on, and how they are equipping their organization for these changes.” A Personal ApproachThe Charter meetings are only one touch point for National Journal Group members (for those who can’t make it to Watergate, the meetings are also streamed online). The sales process is designed with the same ”white glove” feel. Potential members are mailed a letter from Atlantic Media chairman and owner David Bradley, detailing the benefits of the service and why it’s a good fit for the courted company. MacDonald’s team follows up with a phone call, and in-person sales meetings are arranged if interest is expressed.According to West, Bradley is largely focused on the “ethic service” portion of membership, which allows organizations to pay one flat fee for company access. The membership model was refined through The Advisory Board Company and The Corporate Executive Board, two companies Bradley successfully founded. Atlantic Media claims to have half of Fortune’s 100 companies on as members, and is now going after the second half. The National Journal team is relying on positive feedback from existing members to prove the service’s worth to new clients. “I think there will be a lot of emphasis on the idea that we are a partner in your ability to succeed in Washington. Frankly, this service helps you look good to the people that you work for,” West tells FOLIO:.Though still early days, the National Journal Group is seeing a 15 percent revenue spike in year-over-year comparison. “Compared to the old subscription model, which faced the prospect of declining revenue, it’s a great turnaround that tells us we’re on the right path,” says West.last_img read more

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Alaska News Nightly January 12 2015

first_imgStories are posted on the APRN news page. You can subscribe to APRN’s newsfeeds via email, podcast and RSS. Follow us on Facebook at alaskapublic.org and on Twitter @aprn.Download AudioTransportation Commish Ousted Following Defense Of Project Joaqlin Estus, KNBA – AnchorageThe head of the state Department of Transportation and Public Facilities, Commissioner Pat Kemp, stepped down today.Young, Credited With Effectiveness, Says Personality is Part of his M.O. Liz Ruskin, APRN – Washington DCAlaska Congressman Don Young was sworn in today for his 22nd term, having missed the main swearing-in last week due to the death of his brother. Recent research by two political scientists say Young is one of the 20 most effective lawmakers in the U.S. House.  Nationally, though, he is more known for his big, sometimes brash personality.Lonnie Dupre Becomes First Ever January Denali Soloist Phillip Manning, KTNA – TalkeetnaHistory has been made on North America’s highest peak. On Sunday, Lonnie Dupre became the first solo climber to summit Denali in the month of January.Juneau Assembly Considers Moratorium On Legal Pot Shops Casey Kelly, KTOO – JuneauThe Juneau Assembly will vote Monday on two measures restricting the manufacture, sale and use of legal marijuana in the city.Anchorage Legislators Consider Ways To Cut Capital Costs Anne Hillman, KSKA – AnchorageBefore heading to Juneau, Anchorage Legislators are listening to community input on ways to cut state spending. They hosted a listening session on Saturday at the Loussac Library. Some community members urged the legislature to cut local capital projects, like the U-Med District Northern Access Road.Adak Fish Plant Seeks Additional Operators Lauren Rosenthal, KUCB – UnalaskaThe community of Adak depends on its fish processing plant for jobs and tax revenue. But they’ve struggled to keep the lights on over the years. Now, the plant’s latest operator is looking for new partners to help shoulder the financial burden.News-Miner to Begin Requiring Electronic Subscriptions for Frequent Online Visitors Tim Ellis, KUAC – FairbanksThe Fairbanks Daily News-Miner will soon begin charging a fee to frequent visitors to its website. The so-called “paywalls” are a growing trend in the U.S. newspaper industry, used by some as way to recoup revenue lost to online news sites. But many in the newspaper industry disagree over whether paywalls hurt or help online readership. And that disagreement is being played out between the Alaska’s two top news sites.Ice Sculptures Take Shape In Downtown AnchorageZachariah Hughes, KSKA – AnchorageArtists wielding chainsaws and drills spent three days this weekend carving blocks of ice into salmon and sea-dragons in downtown Anchorage.last_img read more

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Will Alia Bhatt and Ranbir Kapoors relationship stand the test of time

first_imgRanbir Kapoor; Alia BhattVarinder ChawlaApart from the many incredible couples we have in the industry today, if there’s one couple we can never take our eyes off – has to be Alia Bhatt and Ranbir Kapoor. The dynamic duo not only have been painting the town red but also keep giving us major relationship goals.With every report of the duo experiencing trouble in paradise, both, Ranbir and Alia, shut up the trolls with a romantic picture. Ranbir and Alia’s chemistry at the logo launch of Brahmastra was an absolute sight to behold.Though despite always being under the limelight and having the shutterbugs and their fans judge each of their moves, Ranbir – Alia have moved ahead in their relationship braving all odds. However, the next major box-office clash the duo might face next year might give them a tough time.As per a report in Aaj Tak, Alia Bhatt and SS Rajamouli’s collaboration – RRR – is expected to release on July 31 next year. Ranbir and Vaani Kapoor’s much ambitious project – Shamshera – is also expected to release on the same day. And, if at all the film’s release on the specified date, it could not just be the biggest clash of the year but, also the biggest clash for both Ranbir and Alia.The first look video of Shamshera shows Ranbir Kapoor holding an axe and a quiver full of arrows and leading a group of fighters. His face has a lot of wound marks, giving him a tough look. Going by the attire and the kind of weapons, it looks like Shamshera will be set in the pre-independence era. However, it’s not clear if Ranbir’s character is completely a dark one, or will it have positive shades as well. This is the first time the actor will be seen in such a savage role. He has mostly been seen playing charming characters, but Shamshera will show him in a completely new avatar.last_img read more

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BSE closes points 13552 down on July 28

first_imgBSE closes points 135.52 down on July 284.1K views00:00 / 00:00- 00:00:0000:00BSE closes points 135.52 down on July 284.1K viewsBusinessNew Delhi, July 28 (ANI): Trading at the Bombay Stock Exchange today closed 135.52 points down to stand at 25,991.23. At the National Stock Exchange the Nifty closed 41.75 points down to stand at 7,748.70. Central Bank and Reliance Power were among the top gainers of Group A with an increase of 7.02% and 3.80% along with Hindustan Unilever and Glenmark Pharma with an increase of 3.62% and 3.38% respectively, while the top losers of Group A include Wockhardt and DLF with a decrease of 8.06% and 5.20% along with IRB Infra and CESC with a decrease of 5.11% and 4.60% at the close of the markets. The Auto sector is down 121.36 points at 15,488.20 while the banking sector is down 121.60 points 17,421.39 and the realty sector is down 51.84 points at 1,873.16. The Indian currency is up 0.03% at Rs 60.12 per dollar.Ventuno Web Player 4.50New Delhi, July 28 (ANI): Trading at the Bombay Stock Exchange today closed 135.52 points down to stand at 25,991.23. At the National Stock Exchange the Nifty closed 41.75 points down to stand at 7,748.70. Central Bank and Reliance Power were among the top gainers of Group A with an increase of 7.02% and 3.80% along with Hindustan Unilever and Glenmark Pharma with an increase of 3.62% and 3.38% respectively, while the top losers of Group A include Wockhardt and DLF with a decrease of 8.06% and 5.20% along with IRB Infra and CESC with a decrease of 5.11% and 4.60% at the close of the markets. The Auto sector is down 121.36 points at 15,488.20 while the banking sector is down 121.60 points 17,421.39 and the realty sector is down 51.84 points at 1,873.16. The Indian currency is up 0.03% at Rs 60.12 per dollar.last_img read more

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Calabash Tea Tonic Sets Table for Expansion

first_img“Hard earned and hard won” is a phrase D.C. herbalist Sunyatta Amen often uses to describe how she found success at Calabash Tea & Tonic, a sanctuary offering dozens of teas and tonic shots purporting to boost sexual performance, make you fall in love, ease anxiety and more.Sunyatta Amen is founder and owner of Calabash Tea & Tonic in Shaw area and is preparing to open a new location in Brookland.After nearly three years of tending to Shaw’s needs at 1847 7th Street NW, the fifth-generation herbalist is opening a second teashop in Brookland, hopefully by May 8, a day marking her birthday and the Shaw shop’s third anniversary.Amen sees herself as offering a third option to people who consume legal addictive stimulants in the morning and legal addictive depressants at night.“So it’s coffee in the morning, liquor at night,” said Amen, who lives in Brookland. “And we want to be that alternative, that third answer. It’s not A or B, it’s the third answer sometimes.”As the Northeast D.C. neighborhood continues to transition, Amen is getting into Brookland to offer the same programs to residents before the gentrification really ramps up.The site of the future Calabash Tea & Tonic opening in Brookland.“What you have to do is install those beacons of light for people where they can come and decompress, where everyone is welcome, where people can pop in and feel better about their job, their mission, their life, take a breath,” Amen said. “We’ve had people come in (the Shaw shop) for their first dates and we’ve had people come in here after their houses have burned down.”The new space is 900 square feet, just 50 square feet larger than her Shaw location. But her Brookland digs will include a patio with a garden of medicinal plants and culinary herbs.Amen said she’ll continue developing her partnership with Cultivate the City, an organization that teaches kids how to grow herbs. She said she envisions children building planter boxes and inviting the community to a sip and plant. She expects to hire eight employees, the same number of people working in her Shaw location. Amen said she will continue her commitment to hiring single moms, veterans and returning citizens.Amen will serve the Brookland community through programming that encourages women in shelters to take classes on tea, herb blending, natural skin and body care — a program she’ll continue maintaining at her Shaw location. Amen aims to reconnect people to their community and turn them into healers.“This is a thinly disguised apothecary in a community space,” Amen said of her business. “We want them to know that this is their neighborhood and that they belong here.”Amen’s tea blends are organic and rooted in her Cuban-Jamaican great-grandmother’s formulas. Her parents ran a store similar to her tonic shop near the world-famous Apollo Theater in Harlem —her shop in Shaw is just blocks away from the Howard Theater.The Brookland teahouse will be located at 2701 12th Street NE and it’ll be open from 9am to 8pm. Like the location in Shaw, it will offer coffee, baked goods, pastries and other small things to savor.last_img read more

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Renaming Bengal Mamata writes to PM Modi

first_imgKolkata: Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee has written to Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Wednesday, strongly objecting the Centre’s decision to reject Bengal government’s proposal to change the name of the state from West Bengal to ‘Bangla’.The development took place a couple of hours after the Minister of State (Home), in reply to the Parliament, said that the name of the state cannot be changed as it would require a Constitutional Amendment. In her letter Banerjee pointed out how the proposal had been rejected on previous occasions as well. She requested the Prime Minister to accept the wishes of the people of Bengal and get the amendment done in the current session of the Parliament. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: Mamata”I would request you to kindly accept the wishes of the people of West Bengal, as enshrined in the Resolution of the West Bengal Legislative Assembly and in the proposal of the West Bengal Cabinet, to rename our state as ‘Bangla’ in English, Hindi and Bengali. This re-christening will be in consonance with the history, culture and identity of our state and will reflect on the aspirations of our people,” the letter reads. The letter also mentions that the Chief Secretary of the state had communicated with the Union Home Secretary on August 21 last year, requesting him to initiate necessary action to change the name of the state. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in stateIn August 2016, the West Bengal Assembly had passed another resolution for changing the state’s name to ‘Bengal’ in English, ‘Bangla’ in Bengali and ‘Bangal’ in Hindi. However, the Centre rejected the proposal in 2017, objecting to three separate names in three languages. Parliamentary Affairs minister Partha Chatterjee said in the Assembly that the Centre’s decision to refuse the state government’s proposal regarding the name change has not only maligned the people of Bengal, but also belittled the heritage of the Assembly where a resolution was passed in July 2018 to change the name of the state from West Bengal to Bangla in all three languages. The Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) said on Wednesday that the Mamata Banerjee government’s proposal to change the name of West Bengal to ‘Bangla’ has been rejected. Reacting sharply against the Centre’s decision, the Opposition parties in the state, namely Congress and CPI(M), lent their support to the ruling party as the decision of changing the name of the state had been passed in the Assembly unanimously. Leader of the Opposition Abdul Mannan said during a press conference outside the Assembly that the Centre could have easily executed the Constitutional Amendment in both the Houses of the Parliament and sought a clarification from the Centre on the issue. “The names of many other states were changed through Constitutional Amendment in the past. In case of Bengal, they are reluctant to do so. The Centre has disgraced the Assembly and the people of Bengal,” Mannan said. While speaking on the issue in the Assembly, Chatterjee said: “The Centre is denying the heritage of Bengal. It is evident from its decision to reject our proposal. This is the third time that the Centre has rejected the Bengal government’s appeal. Refusing a resolution unanimously passed in the Assembly can amount to showing disrespect to the state.”last_img read more

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