ASA Communications Team Members at Ag Media Summit

first_imgCommunications staff Wendy Brannen and Jessica Wharton headed west this past week to network with trade media and attend learning sessions at the 20th Ag Media Summit in Scottsdale, Ariz. The annual event is cohosted by the Agricultural Communicators Network and related groups as an opportunity for reporters and communicators in the agriculture arena to come together, compare notes, and leave with new tools for success. Brannen and Wharton attended agriculture tours of the area, along with sessions on digital strategy, crisis communications, photo assets, and social media analytics, to name a few.last_img

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ASA pushes for extension of biodiesel tax incentive

first_imgThis week ASA has been connecting with its members and followers to encourage Congress to pass a multi-year extension of the biodiesel and renewable diesel incentive in tax policy. The tax credit would help blenders and fuel marketers expand the use of biodiesel. When the extensions are short-term, the industry does not have the stability it needs to access capital and invest, hire, and expand as needed. Long-term certainty would assure growth in the industry and lead to greater economic and energy security benefits.Click the images below to see a couple of ASA’s recent social posts, which you can share to get involved:last_img

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Guilty plea for River Rat in bank jobs

first_imgPORTLAND — A 34-year-old man has pleaded guilty in federal court to four Portland bank robberies that helped earn him the nickname “River Rat Bandit.”The River Rat is blamed for a 2009 series of armed robberies on both sides of the Columbia River that netted more than $96,000. In addition to the four Portland bank jobs, The Oregonian reports that the robber hit 14 banks or check cashing outlets in Washington, from Clark County to the Puget Sound area. Prosecutors say Alexey Perez-Hernandez relied on Travis Oles to drive the getaway vehicle. Oles was earlier sentenced to 18 years.Perez-Hernandez entered his guilty pleas Wednesday. Under a plea agreement, he is expected to serve 28 years in federal prison and be ordered to pay nearly $25,000. Sentencing was set for Dec. 7. The newspaper said prosecutors in the Washington counties of Clark, King and Pierce are expected to accept guilty pleas from Perez-Hernandez and allow him to serve those sentences concurrently with his federal term.last_img read more

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One hurt when two SUVs collide in Vancouver

first_imgOne person was hurt Thursday when two SUVs collided at the intersection of Northeast 137th Avenue and Padden Parkway, according to the Vancouver Fire Department.The crash was reported at 9:15 p.m., according to emergency dispatch logs.Vancouver Fire Department Capt. Kevin Murray said one SUV had five passengers; the other had one.Murray said one person suffered injuries that were not life threatening and was transported to a local hospital.The crash was being investigated by the Vancouver Police Department and Washington State Patrol.last_img

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Clark County group gets share of salmon recovery grants

first_imgConservation organizations throughout the state will receive $19.2 million in grants to restore salmon habitat, the Washington Salmon Recovery Funding Board announced Monday.Grant recipients will use the majority of the money to remove in-water barriers that prevent salmon from migrating, create natural habitat for the salmon, and replant riverbanks with shrubbery and trees to shade and cool the water.In Clark County, the Lower Columbia Fish Enhancement Group will receive $322,008 for two of its projects aimed at reviving areas for salmon to reproduce, feed and hide from predators.The work is part of a decade-long attempt to boost dwindling salmon numbers.“Salmon are integral to the state of Washington,” said Susan Zemek, spokeswoman for the Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. “They’re part of the culture here.”One of the projects will improve spawning habitat within the North Fork of the Lewis River.The other will rehabilitate rearing grounds for six different populations of salmon and steelhead at the confluence of Cedar Creek and the North Fork of the Lewis River, four and a half miles downstream from Merwin Dam.As part of that project, the Lower Columbia Fish Enhancement Group will install largelogs and tree roots donated by PacifiCorps throughout a quarter-mile stretch of the creek to provide habitat for chum, chinook and coho salmon, along with steelhead trout.last_img read more

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Take a tour of Clark County on two wheels

first_img What: Southwest Washington’s largest cycling event, with 18-, 34-, 65- and 100-mile loops through the countryside. Hosted by the Vancouver Bicycle Club.When: Registration begins at 6 a.m. Loops are open from 6:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, May 4.Where: All rides start and end at Clark College, Hanna Hall, 1820 Fort Vancouver Way, Vancouver.Admission: $35 for 100-, 65- or 34-mile loops; $25 for 18-mile loop; $15 for ages 13-17; free for children 12 and younger with paid adult.Web: Vancouver Bicycle ClubOne of the best things about going on a big, well-organized bike ride is that you can quit if you need to, said Wade Leckie, owner of Bad Monkey Bikes in Vancouver.That’s not to say you’ll want to stop, but with support vehicles, mechanical help and refreshment areas, the 30th annual Ride Around Clark County is a much safer option than attempting a stamina-breaking ride on your own, said Leckie, who plans to ride in the event this year.“I like to recommend it to folks that are trying to work up to a century (100-mile ride),” Leckie said. “The longer rides are great because there’s so much support. There are a few cars that drive around, and they’ll pick you up and haul you back to the start if you feel you just can’t make it.”The event includes four organized bike rides aimed at various skill levels.The 18-mile loop, the shortest, is always popular with beginners, said Joseph Blanco, board secretary of the Vancouver Bicycle Club, which organizes the event.“It’s pretty flat,” Blanco said. “We get a lot of kids, families, people who don’t ride much. It’s a very family-oriented, easy ride.” The Ride Around Clark County cycling event includes four organized bike rides aimed at various skill levels.last_img read more

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Clark County charter effort draws 20 freeholder candidates so far

first_imgToday is the first day to file as a Clark County freeholder candidate, and at least 20 residents, many of them familiar political figures, have already thrown their hats in the ring. In all, 15 freeholders will be elected, and they will get the chance to write a charter for Clark County. The so-called home-rule charter would allow the county to be governed by its own set of rules, as long as those rules don’t conflict with the U.S. or Washington state constitutions. Here’s who has filed so far: District 1, Position 1: Garry Lucas District 1, Position 2: Ann Rivers District 1, Position 5: Randy Mueller District 2, Position 2: Lloyd Halverson and Debbie AbrahamDistrict 2, Position 3: Judie StantonDistrict 2, Position 4: Paul DennisDistrict 3, Position 1: Pat Jollota, Michael Heywood and Sunrise O’Mahoney District 3, Position 2: Val Ogden, Rob Figley and Paul HarrisDistrict 3, Position 3: Jim Moeller, Maureen Andrade, Bruce Samuelson and Jerry KeenDistrict 3, Position 4: Temple Lentz and Dan BarnesDistrict 3, Position 5: Jim MainsFreeholders can propose a number of changes to county governance, including increasing the number of commissioners who serve Clark County or creating a binding code of ethics for elected officials. Whatever charter they create must be approved by the voters.The filing period for Clark County freeholder candidates ends 5 p.m. Friday. Candidates must be registered to vote, and they have to have been residents of Clark County for at least five years. The list of candidates who have filed to run in the Nov. 5 election is available on the Clark County website. Freeholder positions are nonpartisan, and terms last up to one year.This story will be updated.last_img read more

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Lets get the hell out of here

first_imgOne of the biggest projects of Richard Waitt’s career began in a noisy Seattle bar on a Friday night.It was there that Waitt, a geologist with the Cascades Volcano Observatory in Vancouver, connected with a man and woman who narrowly escaped with their lives after the catastrophic 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens.It was early June, a few weeks after the disaster. Waitt had seen their story in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer while passing through town. He called the reporter, tracked the two down and met them at the bar. Waitt conducted his own interview, taking notes, not sure what he would do with it at the time.Waitt was among many U.S. Geological Survey scientists who had descended on Washington that year, working to better understand the eruption that had just changed modern volcanology.“I’m not a reporter, but it was just interesting,” Waitt said. “I felt it would help with the science.”More than three decades and hundreds of interviews later, Waitt is finishing a new book compiling detailed, dramatic first-hand accounts of Mount St. Helens’ 1980 eruption and its aftermath. The book, titled “In the Path of Destruction: Eyewitness Chronicles of Mount St. Helens,” is set to be published in November by Washington State University Press.The book will offer a new glimpse at a defining event in the region’s history.“There’s huge value in it. People understand stories,” said Carolyn Driedger, outreach coordinator for the Cascades Volcano Observatory.She added: “We need to keep the story alive.”Today marks the 34th anniversary of the massive eruption that decapitated Mount St. Helens and drastically altered the Northwest landscape. The disaster killed 57 people, flattened miles of forest and darkened skies as ash billowed from the volcano’s crater.last_img read more

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46000 drug felons eligible for early release

first_imgWASHINGTON — Tens of thousands of federal inmates serving time for drug crimes may be eligible for early release under a cost-cutting proposal adopted Friday to dramatically reduce the nation’s prison population over time.The U.S. Sentencing Commission, which voted this year to substantially lower recommended sentences for drug-dealing felons, voted unanimously to retroactively apply that change to prisoners now behind bars.More than 46,000 inmates, including many who have already served a decade or longer in prison, would be eligible to seek early release under the commission’s decision. A judge would review the case of each prisoner seeking to get out early to decide if the release would jeopardize public safety. The releases would start in November 2015 and take a period of years. The commission, an independent panel that sets sentencing policy, estimates sentences would be cut by an average of 25 months. “The magnitude of the change, both collectively and for individual offenders, is significant,” said commission chairwoman Patti Saris, a federal judge in Massachusetts.Advocates of the early-release plan say it would cut prison costs — nearly one-half of the federal prison population is locked up for drug crimes — and scale back some of the harsh sentences imposed during the country’s war on drugs. Prisoner advocacy groups immediately trumpeted the change, calling it a matter of fundamental fairness. “This vote will change the lives of tens of thousands of families whose loved ones were given overly long drug sentences,” Julie Stewart, president of Families Against Mandatory Minimums, said in a statement.last_img read more

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How can data from group risk products help form a strategy

first_imgHR and benefits professionals are coming under increasing pressure to make better use of big data and analytics in order to make better decisions in areas such as talent, reward and engagement. However, many industry experts believe that organisations are missing a trick in failing to make the most of their benefits data to better understand their population risks and develop a more effective group risk strategy.Connect the dataGroup risk protection products include life assurance, critical illness insurance and income protection, benefits that, in addition to financial protection, provide additional support services, such as employee assistance programmes (EAPs), absence management, online health assessments, mental-health first-aid training, and access to counselling and physiotherapy.They are also a rich source of data that can be collated and used to improve workplace wellness strategies and cut costs, yet many organisations are failing to make that connection.Matthew Lawrence, head of broking and health and risk proposition at Aon Employee Benefits, says: “In our recent Benefits and trends survey [published in November 2015], nearly 40% of employers did not use any data analytics to inform or drive their corporate health and wellbeing approach. Where data was used, just over a quarter used medical, income protection, life and/or critical illness data to drive decisions.”Examples of the data sets that employers often have access to include absence data, occupational health data, claims data from medical, life, income protection and/or critical illness schemes and data from EAP services usage.Effective use of this data can help to identify any problem areas, and also highlight what is working well, which can influence costs, says Katharine Moxham, spokesperson for industry body Group Risk Development (Grid). “If a manufacturing [organisation], for example, has a very good health and safety record, it should be sharing that with its group risk provider,” she says. “If an [organisation] has good EAP usage, [it should] share it with [its] group risk provider.”Benchmark risk areasThe data can also be used for benchmarking key areas of group risk. Paul Avis, marketing director at Canada Life Group Risk, says: “With aggregated data drawn from health risk assessments, [employers] have a line in the sand, whether [they] are looking at health issues relating to obesity, heart disease, cancer or stress. Once it is benchmarked [they] can see, for example, how calls to [the] EAP services are affected.”Providers can also help employers make best use of their data by benchmarking to show how their rates of sickness absence, or even specific health issues in the workplace, compare with others in the sector.Address sickness absenceThe availability of data is also encouraging employers to consider offering wider group risk benefits to staff to help reduce sickness absence. Leighton Churchill, corporate account manager at Jelf Employee Benefits, says: “By implementing these benefits and actively participating and adhering to the early intervention and rehabilitation services that insurers provide with the contracts, employers are beginning to see the benefits of a healthier workforce leading to improved productivity and staff morale.”One of the challenges employers face is knowing how to use the various data sets they have to best understand their employee health risks and truly integrate their health and benefits strategy. The key to this is to involve the group risk providers and make it a collaborative exercise, says Avis. “In the first instance [employers] need to get all [their] group risk providers to agree on how they will report back on their data,” he adds. “[They] then need to bring them all together to share their data sets. A lot of benefits advisers have developed databases that can pull this data into a health board very effectively.”To produce good data, employers need to have the right tools and the infrastructure in place to record it accurately, and more organisations are recognising this, says Andrew Potterton, head of proposition development at Unum UK. Where they struggle is in maintaining consistent reporting among their line managers. “It is important to provide line managers with training in workforce wellbeing to engender employee trust and ensure consistent reporting practices,” Potterton explains.Making best use of data to join together all of the facets of wellness, including financial protection, delivers tangible advantages for both employers and employees. Understanding the root causes of poor employee health, and making improvements to it requires a truly integrated approach. “That should be an employer’s objective,” adds Lawrence. “Experience suggests that taking a piecemeal approach often delivers less benefit for the business than might be expected.”Oracle uses group risk data to inform wellbeing strategyAt technology firm Oracle, the use of data is key to enhancing group risk provision for the organisation and boosting the benefits and workplace wellbeing strategy for its UK employees.Michelle Bradshaw, compensation and benefits director UK, Ireland and Israel, says: “The data that can be drawn from things [such as] income protection claims, the take-up of certain benefits, and our sickness absence rates enables us to be much more strategic. For example, from a risk point of view, given that most group income protection claims are cancer-related, we decided to target the issue of male cancer through workplace campaigns, which breaks down the stigma that surrounds the subject and also raises awareness of the importance of early detection and intervention.”The organisation’s effective use of data relies on the input of all of Oracle’s health-related benefits providers, including providers of the employee assistance programme (EAP), life assurance, group income protection and critical illness benefits, which Bradshaw invites to get together on a quarterly basis to analyse the data.Bradshaw adds: “As well as helping to improve long-term sickness management policies and offer a more focused wellbeing offering, we can use the data to work out which benefits our employees want, whether [this is] income protection or life assurance, and by incorporating choice and flexibility into the offering, make those benefits available to them at a cost level that suits them.” Need to know:Data can be used for internal and external benchmarking, which can identify strengths and weaknesses in a group risk strategy.Line management training in workplace wellbeing is key to accurate sickness absence data reporting and analysis.A collaborative and integrated approach to data analysis, involving all group risk providers, will deliver the most effective group risk strategy.last_img read more

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DWP consults on autoenrolment measures for DB schemes and offshore staff

first_imgThe Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has launched a consultation into whether auto-enrolment regulations relating to the quality of defined benefit (DB) schemes used for auto-enrolment purposes, and occupational pension provision for seafarers and offshore staff is working as intended.The consultation, which will run until 30 August 2017, will form part of the DWP’s statutory review on automatic-enrolment. It will focus on reviewing the operation of two specific regulations under the 2008 Pensions Act to ensure the measures are working in practice and are not creating unintended consequences.The consultation will look to gather insight on whether simplified tests introduced to measure the quality of DB pension schemes used to meet auto-enrolment duties are operating correctly and continue to deliver efficiencies for both employers and schemes. This includes reviewing tests established to ensure DB schemes used for auto-enrolment meet the minimum quality requirements set out in law. These comprise: a cost of accruals test, which is based on the cost to the scheme of the future accrual of active members’ benefits, and a test which enables certain hybrid schemes to use the money purchase quality requirements, based on a minimum contribution equivalent to 8% of qualifying earnings.The simplified tests were introduced in April 2015 as a result of consultations carried out in 2013 and 2014. Previously, the minimum quality requirements were tested by virtue of a DB scheme being contracted out of the State Second Pension (Additional State Pension), or by meeting the test scheme standards which compares an existing DB scheme to a hypothetical DB scheme.The consultation will also review whether secondary legislation that includes offshore employees and seafarers who are ordinarily based in the UK in an employer’s auto-enrolment duties is operating as intended. Regulations in the Occupational and Personal Pension Schemes (Automatic Enrolment) (Amendment) Regulations 2012 and The Automatic Enrolment (Offshore Employment) Order 2012 require the government to review and publish a report on the effectiveness of this legislation by 1 July 2018 to establish whether the order should be allowed to expire, be revoked early or continue past the order’s expiry date of 1 July 2020.The order currently states that seafarers and offshore employees who work, or ordinarily work, in the UK should be treated in the same way as land-based employees. This means they will be auto-enrolled into an occupational pension scheme if they meet the age and earnings criteria, or they will be offered the opportunity to join a workplace pension scheme if they do not meet automatic-enrolment criteria.The call for evidence is looking to collect feedback from employers, employee representatives, pension industry professionals, actuaries, independent financial advisers, and employee benefits consultants.last_img read more

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17 of over50s have access to workplace wellbeing support

first_imgUnder one-fifth (17%) of employee respondents aged 50 or over have access to workplace wellbeing initiatives or advice that could mitigate the impact of health issues on their caeers, according to research by Aviva.Its Real retirement report, which surveyed 3,327 UK adults aged 50 or over, including 1,829 adults who are still working, also found that just 14% of respondents believe their workplace culture is positive towards older employees.The research also found: 48% of respondents expect to work past the age of 65, 23% plan to work into their 70s, 13% do not expect to ever fully retire, and 41% do not know when they will be able to retire fully.62% of respondents who know when they expect to retire state that their expected retirement age is older than they thought it would be 10 years ago.43% of respondents retiring later than planned cite inadequate pension savings as the reason for this, and 32% report that the cost of living means they cannot afford to stop working.34% of respondents retiring later than planned opt to keep working because they enjoy the mental stimulation of their job, and 27% feel they would be lonely without the social interaction.19% of respondents believe their employer’s views on older employees limits their future work prospects, and 22% are concerned that their jobs will not suit their needs for as long as they need them to.47% of respondents view a positive workplace culture as the most valuable form of workplace support for employees over the age of 50, and 33% believe measures such as reduced working hours, part-time hours or job-sharing are important.55% of respondents are worried that work will become detrimental to their health or that they might not be well enough to keep working, and 13% identify this is an issue that is already affecting them.Lindsey Rix (pictured), managing director, savings and retirement at Aviva, said: “There is now a clear trend of people working for longer and delaying their retirement. Although some are staying in work out of financial necessity, others want to keep working because they value the mental and social stimulation their job brings.“One of the primary concerns people have about working beyond their 50s is the impact this could have on their health or whether any health concerns might prevent them from working. Although it’s hard to predict what the future might bring, having access to health and wellbeing support in the workplace can help minimise the impact health problems have on people’s ability to work. Flexible-working options and reduced responsibilities are also a way of ensuring those with developing health concerns can remain in the workforce.“Negative employer views towards older [employees] are a real roadblock to over-50s’ careers, and need to be stamped out as quickly as possible. Employers must recognise that over-50s bring with them a wealth of valuable knowledge, skills and experience that would be an asset to any business. [Employees] who feel undervalued at work on the basis of their age should therefore feel safe to speak up and voice their concerns. All older [employees] should have the opportunity to support both their financial and personal wellbeing through work.”last_img read more

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80 participate in sharesave schemes because they are a convenient way to

first_imgFour-fifths (80%) of respondents who participate sharesave employee share schemes do so because they believe they are a convenient way to save, according to research by Proshare.Its Attitudes to employee share ownership report, which surveyed 1,699 employees across 11 UK organisations, also found that 67% of respondents find the matching shares that are available as part of a share incentive plan (Sip) are valuable to them, and 58% cite that the tax advantages of the plan are valuable to them.The research also found:75% of respondents who participate in a sharesave scheme do so because they want to profit from the shares and 38% took part in order to own shares in the organisation.46% of male respondents who take part in a sharesave scheme do so for share ownership, compared to 26% of female respondents.40% of respondents who do not participate in a sharesave scheme admit this is because they cannot afford to participate. Other reasons to not participate include that the respondent may not be with the organisation long enough to benefit (16%), that they have other arrangements (21%), or they do not understand how the scheme works (6%).84% of respondents are aware that sharesave savings could be repaid at their request at any time, 86% are aware of a choice in savings terms, 92% are aware of the option price discount, and 58% are aware that they can take up to six months’ break from contributions.54% of respondents who have been with their organisation for five to 10 years cite affordability as the reason why they do not participate in sharesave schemes, compared to 18% of respondents who have worked at their organisation for less than a year.48% of respondents who do not participate in a sharesave scheme think that a shorter savings terms would encourage them to join the scheme, compared to 46% who would consider joining if they could vary their monthly contribution amount.69% of respondents are aware of Sips, with 80% aware that they must hold their shares for five years for them to be tax-free and 42% are aware that the free share maximum award value is £3,600 per tax year.68% of male respondents value the tax advantages of Sips, compared to 28% of female respondents.70% of full-time respondents participate in Sips to gain profit from the shares, compared to 46% of part-time respondents.25% of respondents do not participate in Sips because they do not understand how it works, 32% cannot afford to participate, 17% are not aware of the plan, 24% believe shares are a risky investment and 24% think they may not be with the organisation long enough to benefit.66% of respondents who do not participate in a Sip would consider joining if there was a greater maximum value of free shares at award, 49% would be encouraged to participate if there was an improved matching ratio, and 38% would think about participating if the maximum holding period was shorter than five years but longer than three years.Gabbi Stopp (pictured), head of employee share ownership at Proshare, said: “When [sharesave] was introduced the aspiration was that it would democratise share ownership, improve employer and employee relations and act as a retention tool. The evidence now suggests that the very features that were originally designed to encourage retention are now discouraging increasing numbers of employees from participating.“There is a long-established link between employee share ownership, employee engagement and increased productivity. But the length of time that an employee is required to commit to a share plan, for example, five years minimum for Sip, and the penalties if she or he doesn’t stay with their employer for this length of time, simply does not match up to the current average tenure for millennial employees of 2.2 years, compared to 4.4 years average overall.“[Under a quarter (24%)] of all non-joiner employees say they don’t join their [organisation’s] Sip because they wouldn’t be there long enough to benefit from it. This figure leaps to 48% among millennials and 50% among employees with less than one year’s service.“To ensure both employers and employees continue to benefit from share ownership we need to remove some of these barriers to entry, introduce more flexibility and promote the benefits to young workers.”last_img read more

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Licensefree fishing to begin this weekend for residents visitors

first_imgMIAMI (WSVN) – For residents and visitors without a fishing license, there will be two license-free fishing weekends in June, said Florida’s governor.Gov. Rick Scott announced, Friday, that beginning Saturday and Sunday, fishing in salt water without a license will be allowed.The following Saturday and Sunday will, also, be license-free, but exclusive to fresh water fishing.Scott said he wants families to take advantage of this opportunity to enjoy both summer and fishing together.The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will be hosting two license-free fishing events, as well. Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img

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FBI releases pictures of SW MiamiDade bank robber

first_imgSOUTHWEST MIAMI-DADE, FLA. (WSVN) – The FBI has released surveillance pictures of a thief who robbed a Citi Bank in Southwest Miami-Dade, Thursday.According to police, the thief walked into a City Bank, located along Kendall Drive and Lindgren Road,  wearing a red shirt and a white hat.He then demanded money from an employee.If you have any information on this bank robbery, call Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers at 305-471-TIPS. Remember, you can always remain anonymous, and you may be eligible for a $1,000 reward.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img

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MDFR rescues 4 people after boat capsizes off Key Biscayne

first_imgKEY BISCAYNE, FLA. (WSVN) – Miami-Dade Fire Rescue came to the rescue of four people who became stranded at sea after their boat capsized off the coast of Key Biscayne.MDFR responded to the scene at 9:23 a.m., Monday, after receiving reports of a 25-foot boat capsizing seven miles southeast of the Cape Florida Lighthouse in Key Biscayne.Upon their arrival, crews pulled four people from the water, all in good condition.All four passengers were safely taken back to shore.MDFR also used the rescue as an opportunity to warn boaters to check boating conditions. A small craft advisory had been in place for the area.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img

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5 injured in Hialeah Gardens headon collision

first_imgHIALEAH GARDENS, FLA. (WSVN) – Police are investigating a Hialeah Gardens crash that sent five people to the hospital.The head-on collision happened Tuesday morning in the area of Northwest 60th Avenue and 138th Street.According to officials, there were four teenagers in one car and one adult in the other.Three people had to be airlifted to a nearby hospital, while the other two were transported by ground. Their conditions remain unknown.The cause of the crash remains under investigation.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img

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Endangered Indian rhino at Zoo Miami is pregnant

first_imgShe was born at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park in January 2012 and arrived at Zoo Miami in December 2015.This is her first pregnancy.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. SOUTHWEST MIAMI-DADE, FLA. (WSVN) – A rare endangered rhinoceros at Zoo Miami is now eating for two.The zoo announced that 6-year-old one-horned rhino Akuti is pregnant.Akuti is an endangered Indian rhino, whose breed is usually hunted for their horn.The baby was achieved through artificial insemination in January.Staff members brought equipment to do an ultrasound and get a good look at her baby’s beating heart, Wednesday.If Akuti can successfully bring the pregnancy to term, it will be the first rhino to be born in the United States through artificial insemination.Akuti is expected to give birth sometime in April 2019. last_img read more

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Taxi driver OK after being trapped under semitruck on I95 in NE

first_imgNORTHEAST MIAMI-DADE, FLA. (WSVN) – A South Florida cabbie is counting his blessings after his car ended up under a semi-truck along Interstate 95 in Northeast Miami-Dade, trapping him inside.Cellphone video captured half the victim’s vehicle lodged under the big rig along the northbound lanes near the Ives Dairy Road exit, Thursday night.Florida Highway Patrol troopers and Miami-Dade Fire Rescue units responded to the scene of the crash, just after 7 p.m.Troopers were able to pull the taxi driver out of his car.Officials said everyone involved in the crash is OK.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img

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Additional Russian River Upper Kenai River Sockeye Salmon Bag Limit Increase Announced

first_imgArea Management Biologist Colton Lipka: “We opened the waters of the sanctuary and increased the bag limit from three to six last week and sockeye salmon keep pouring into the Russian River. With these numbers, it is appropriate to increase the limits and allow anglers an opportunity to harvest more sockeye salmon.” As of June 16, 2019, 45,778 sockeye salmon have passed the Russian River weir, located upstream of the falls. The early-run Russian River sockeye salmon biological escapement goal of 22,000 – 42,000 sockeye salmon has been exceeded. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Department of Fish and Game has once again increased the limits of sockeye salmon for the Russian River and a section of the Upper Kenai River. The new increase is nine per day, eighteen in possession effective 12:01 a.m. Wednesday, June 19 through 11:59 p.m. Sunday, July 7. The section of the mainstream Upper Kenai River includes the area that extends from Skilak Lake upstream to ADF&G regulatory markers located approximately 300 yards upstream of the public boat launch at Sportsman’s Landing (this includes the Russian River Sanctuary Area) and the Russian River from its mouth upstream to an ADF&G marker located approximately 600 yards downstream from the Russian River Falls. Anglers are reminded that they may possess only the limit allowed for the waters they are actively fishing. For additional information on the Upper Kenai River and Russian River Area, review pages 59-61 of the 2019 Southcentral Alaska Sport Fishing Regulations Summary booklet.last_img read more

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