HESLS presents discussion on ‘Power Dynamics in Negotiation’

first_imgThe Harvard Extension Service and Leadership Society (HESLS), in conjunction with the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School, presented “Power Dynamics In Negotiations” on Saturday (May 3).The event, which featured a diverse lineup of speakers, incorporated two panels: “Personal & Financial Negotiations” and “Culture, Ethnicity and Race in Negotiations.”Despite the inclement weather, approximately 240 people gathered at the Harvard Yenching Institute to hear Jeswald Salacuse, professor of law at Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts, offer the keynote address.“Ethnic and racial conflicts are the most difficult to negotiate because they involve identity and the core of who you are,” said Salacuse told the audience.The HESLS, which serves Harvard’s community of Extension School students who maintain an active interest in public service and leadership, considered this event a “historical first.”“While organizing and selecting speakers, some leading negotiation scholars at HBS [Harvard Business School] and KSG [Harvard Kennedy School] indicated their personal approval of … this event especially because the topic of race in negotiations is understudied and can be seen as groundbreaking within the field of negotiation theory and practice here at Harvard,” said Andre Bisasor, conference chair and HESLS president. The forum’s topic, he continued, also resonated well with the students.last_img read more

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Lincoln Middle goes all-virtual following COVID-19 case

first_imgIn-person instruction at Abraham Lincoln Middle School in the Port Arthur Independent School District will be closed beginning Thursday (Dec. 10), and virtual instruction will be used through Monday (Dec. 14) after an individual tested positive for COVID-19.The school district made the announcement in a letter to Lincoln parents through the Blackboard Connect call-out system at 9:50 Wednesday but did not indicate whether the individual is a student or employee.The letter reads:“Good evening Abraham Lincoln Middle School parents, Parents, please monitor the health of your students and continue to utilize safe practices, both in and out of the home. We will get through this together.Have a good evening.” We apologize for the late messaging.On the evening of December 9, Abraham Lincoln Middle School was notified of an individual who tested positive for the COVID-19 virus and an exposure to several others. In order to mitigate the spread of the virus, Abraham Lincoln Middle School will close in-person instruction and move to virtual instruction beginning Thursday, December 10th through Monday, December 14th. In person instruction will resume on Tuesday, December 15th.We have immediately implemented steps in our emergency response plan to minimize the impact, including sanitizing and disinfecting the school campus to keep all employees and students healthy and safe.All students are expected to participate in virtual instruction beginning tomorrow through next Monday. Teachers will be in contact with students and parents through the online platform.last_img read more

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XTERRA veteran Mieko Carey joins board of Northern Mariana Islands Triathlon…

first_imgMieko Carey, an XTERRA veteran has been appointed a member of the Northern Mariana Islands Triathlon Federation (NMITF) board. “Mieko has been a long standing member and actively involved in most of the endurance sports held on Saipan and the region. She brings great enthusiasm to our team and we are very happy to have her on the board,” said President Russ Quinn.Carey joins board members Fred Camacho and Rex Kosack. Other officers are Joshua Berger, Vice President; Mike Johnson, Treasurer; and Secretary Lewie Tenorio.During its first meeting of 2009, NMITF discussed plans about changing its name. “Our goal is to take some of the stigma away from the sport of triathlon. Many people believe that a triathlon is too difficult and only ‘crazy’ people do them. But this is untrue. There are many reasons to be involved with triathlon and other sports that promote fitness,” Quinn added.Commenting on the accessibility of triathlon, Quinn noted the opportunities “to get exposure to this sport. Then as interest increases, we the triathlon federation, create small enticer events. These events are very small distances that allow a beginner to try all three disciplines at very doable distances,” he added.“We are checking on some non-profit corporation status stuff. So, once that is cleared, we will make an announcement,” the NMITF head concluded.   Relatedlast_img read more

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Life Time Fitness entices new triathletes with relay options

first_imgLife Time Fitness Inc has announced the addition of two new relay options to the Toyota US Open Triathlon: the Fantasy and Match Relays. According to the company, specifically aimed at introducing new participants to triathlon, the Fantasy and Match Relays will provide single-sport athletes an entirely new race experience.“Life Time Fitness has approached the sport of triathlon with a sense of innovation, beginning with the introduction of our ground-breaking triathlon in Minneapolis in 2002, and continuing with the creation of our Triathlon Series,” said Ken Cooper, Vice President, Endurance and Athletic Events.“And, we continue to see an opportunity to grow the sport by delivering events for all participants – no matter what skill level or status – to take part.“By providing new alternative racing experiences to those who wouldn’t normally consider or participate in a triathlon, we’re encouraging these individuals interested in only one or two endurance events to step outside their comfort zone and add variety to their active lifestyles.”Fantasy Relay With the Fantasy Relay, participants now can be a part of the triathlon action alongside the Life Time Fitness Triathlon Series professional triathletes. Participants simply register and select one leg – swim, bike or run – in which they will compete. Then also select two virtual teammates from the roster of top professional triathletes for the other two legs of the Life Time Fitness Triathlon Series event in which they are competing.Ultimately, the time of the participant’s leg will be added to the times of their professional teammates to determine an overall finish time. Awards will be given out to the top three male and top three female Fantasy Relay teams. The Fantasy Relay will be offered on the international-distance course, featuring a 1.5K (0.93 mile) swim, 40K (25.8 mile) bike and 10K (6.2 mile) run.Match Relay Interested in a relay, but cannot find fellow teammates? With the Match Relay, Life Time Fitness’ endurance experts build relay teams around each participant. Participants simply register to swim, cycle or run, and race directors identify two corresponding teammates to fulfil the other two legs of the event. Awards will be given to the top three male and top three female Match Relay teams. Match Relay will be offered on the international-distance course.Individuals interested in the Fantasy or Match Relay may register at the Toyota US Open website at www.toyotausopentriathlon.com.www.ltfathleticevents.com www.lifetimefitness.com Relatedlast_img read more

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FAWL, voluntary bars plan cultural awareness program

first_img December 15, 2008 Regular News FAWL, voluntary bars plan cultural awareness program The Florida Association for Women Lawyers, in cooperation with nine voluntary bar associations, will sponsor a CLE luncheon January 16, 2009, titled “The Battle Against Bias — Cultural Awareness and the Practice of Law.”The CLE lunch will be held at the Miami Courtyard Marriott at 200 SE 2nd Street in downtown Miami, located across the street from The Florida Bar’s Midyear Meeting location.The course presentation is designed to weave together the ethics rules of effective representation with research on interpersonal communication in various cultures, the view of the role of lawyers in other cultures, how cultural norms influence the law, and emerging trends in which cultural values are influencing the practice of law.Jan Jacobowitz, program director of the Corporate & Professional Responsibility Program, the Center for Ethics & Public Service at the University of Miami’s School of Law, will be the featured speaker. Other presenters include Arnell Bryant-Willis, vice president of EW Bryant Associates, a consulting and training services company in Tallahassee, and a public member of The Florida Bar’s Board of Governors, and Jennifer Coberly, general counsel for Point Blank Solutions. Coberly is a former member of the Board of Governors and a member of the Bar’s Outreach Committee.CLE credit is anticipated to be awarded at 1.5 hours to include ethics credit.The cost of the lunch and CLE is $40 for members of all sponsoring organizations and $50 for non-members. For more information and to register online, visit www.fawl.org or call (850) 894-0055.The other sponsoring organizations are the Asian Pacific American Bar Association of South Florida, the Cuban American Bar Association, the Gwen S. Cherry Black Women Lawyers Association, the Haitian Lawyers Association, Miami-Dade FAWL, the Puerto Rican Bar Association of Florida, the South Asian Bar Association of Florida, the Virgil Hawkins Florida Chapter of the National Bar Association, and the Wilkie D. Ferguson, Jr. Bar Association.center_img FAWL, voluntary bars plan cultural awareness programlast_img read more

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Gophers’ depth fuels their success

first_imgAnd so far, that depth has led to success in the win column.Minnesota is 9-3 this season after winning 10 matches all of last year.Merzbacher said the depth of his team has played a large role in the improvement.“We just ran out of players last year with all the injuries,” he said. “Now we’re strong at every spot.“That’s big now, but it will be even bigger for us in the Big Ten season.”And while Rincon Otero said it is good to take pressure off of some of the top players as the Big Ten season approaches, she said the pressure isn’t exclusive to the top half of the lineup.“It takes pressure off of them, which is good,” she said, “but there is pressure for us, too, because we all want to be in the lineup.”Still, that pressure seems to be a good thing for the Gophers this season.And Lambert said the bottom half of the lineup, in particular, wants to keep the success rolling this weekend.“We feed off of our previous wins,” she said, “and we just want to keep the momentum going against Marquette.” Gophers’ depth fuels their successMinnesota is a combined 30-6 at No. 4, No. 5 and No. 6 singles. Dane MizutaniMarch 6, 2014Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintThe Gophers women’s tennis team has made the doubles point an area of emphasis all season, but the depth of the roster might be its best-kept secret.Minnesota is a combined 30-6 at No. 4, No. 5 and No. 6 singles this season — a stark contrast to last season, when that area of the lineup was plagued with injuries and inconsistencies.“In our previous years, we kind of struggled toward the bottom half of the lineup,” junior Julia Courter said. “It’s great that we have so much depth on this team and we know we’re going to get great matches throughout the lineup.”Gophers head coach Chuck Merzbacher said earlier this year that he needed to see more production from the bottom half of his lineup.That group has responded to the challenge.Courter is 8-1 at No. 4 singles this season. She said she takes a lot of pride in taking pressure off players at the top of the singles lineup.“We’ve been practicing really hard up into the matches, and it’s been really successful for us,” Courter said.While Courter has found a home near the bottom of the lineup, junior Aria Lambert and sophomore Paula Rincon Otero have added to the depth of the team, too.Lambert is 4-3 this season at No. 5 singles, and Rincon Otero is 5-1 at No. 6 singles.Merzbacher said he’s gotten to the point this year when he almost expects wins from those players.“It takes a lot of pressure off of the top half of the lineup,” Merzbacher said. “We want to win with our depth.”last_img read more

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After Hours: Michael A. Pollack

first_imgKnowing more about the people we work with is the fun side of the business. It helps start conversations and strengthens business relationships.In this installation of “After Hours,” meet Michael A. Pollack, president of Pollack Real Estate Investments in Mesa. Pollack founded his company 40 years ago. Along with its affiliates, Pollack Real Estate Investments has been involved in more than 12 MSF of real estate projects throughout the U.S. He takes pride in being involved in all aspects of real estate including the ownership, management, construction, business negotiations, acquisitions, sales, contracts, finance and leasing of various types of company-owned projects. Born and raised: San Jose, Calif.Wife: Cheryl PollackEducation: San Jose State UniversityFavoritesSports // Football and basketballMusic // Rhythm and bluesTravel destination // EuropeLeisure activities // Playing drums with my band, Corporate Affair, and collecting antique pieces, including advertising statues, animated displays and antique slot machines for my Pollack Advertising Museum What did you think you’d be when you grew up? Either a musician or a real estate developer.Of what personal or professional accomplishment are you most proud? Surviving the 2009 to 2011 real estate meltdown without renegotiating a single loan and paying all my bills in full and on time.What would people be surprised to know about you?In 1973, when I graduated from high school, I almost went overseas on tour with a band instead of entering the real estate business. After careful consideration, I chose real estate, because as a drummer who couldn’t sing very well my future earning ability in music didn’t look as bright as my potential earning ability in real estate. I promised myself back in 1973 that I would return to play the drums when I didn’t have to make a living at it. In 2005, I formed the band Corporate Affair and we have played more than 100 shows that have included performances at various charity events around the Valley and at the major parades such as Phoenix Electric Light Parade, Tempe Fantasy of Lights Parade and the Fiesta Bowl Parade. How did the Pollack Advertising Museum start? My interest in collectibles actually started when I was about 13 years old. I would go to flea markets on Saturdays and buy electric beer signs, repair them Saturday night and then take them to antique stores and sell them on Sundays for a profit. My favorite story involves a life-size Bosch battery man displaying a car battery. The Bosch man was found in what used to be East Berlin after the wall was torn down under a dilapidated building, inside a coffin. I also enjoy collecting animated Baranger displays and antique slot machines. The Pollack Advertising Museum has grown from a few dozen pieces in my basement 40 years ago to a world-class museum with more than 8,000 pieces on display.What is the best business advice you’ve been given? Always be able to “CYA” — cover your assets!What advice would you share with people early in their real estate career?If you want to be successful, be willing to work hard, learn all you can about the business you choose and always deal with honesty and integrity. To nominate a colleague, request an After Hours form from Amanda Ventura, amanda.ventura@azbigmedia.com.last_img read more

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Crowdsourcing brain data: Overnight experiment creates social brain lab

first_imgThe installation was one of the most popular at Nuit Blanche, with an average lineup wait time of two hours.Studying brains in a social and multi-sensory environment is closer to real life and may help scientists to approach questions of complex real-life social cognition that otherwise are not accessible in traditional labs that study one person’s cognitive functions at a time.“In traditional lab settings, the environment is so controlled that you can lose some of the fine points of real-time brain activity that occur in a social life setting,” said Dr. Kovacevic, creative producer of My Virtual Dream and program manager of the Centre for Integrative Brain Dynamics at Baycrest’s Rotman Research Institute.“What we’ve done is taken the lab to the public. We collaborated with multi-media artists, made this experiment incredibly engaging, attracted highly motivated subjects which is not easy to do in the traditional lab setting, and collected useful scientific data from their experience.”Results from the experiment not only demonstrated the scientific viability of collective neurofeedback as a potential new avenue of neuroscience research that takes into account individuality, complexity and sociability of the human mind, but yielded new evidence that neurofeedback learning can have an effect on the brain almost immediately.Neurofeedback learning supports mindful awareness and joins a growing market for wearable biofeedback devices. The device used in this study, Muse™, is a clinical-grade EEG brain computer interface (BCI) headband that helps individuals to be more aware of their brain states (relaxed versus focused versus distracted) and learn self-regulation of brain function to fit their personal goals.A total of 523 adults (209 males, 314 females), ranging in age from 18 to 89, with an average age of 31, contributed their EEG brain data for the study. Each session involved 20 participants being seated in a semicircle in front of a stage and divided into four groups (“pods”) of five. They played a collective neurofeedback computer game where they were required to manipulate their mental states of relaxation and concentration. The neurofeedback training lasted 6.5 minutes, which is much shorter than typical neurofeedback training experiments.The massive amount of EEG data collected in one night yielded an interesting and statistically relevant finding – that subtle brain activity changes were taking place within approximately one minute of the neurofeedback learning exercise – unprecedented speed of learning changes that have not been demonstrated before.“These results really open up a whole new domain of neuroscience study that actively engages the public to advance our understanding of the brain,” said Dr. Randy McIntosh, director of the Rotman Research Institute and vice-president of Research at Baycrest. He is a senior author on the paper.The idea for the Nuit Blanche art -science experiment was inspired by Baycrest’s ongoing international project to build the world’s first functional, virtual brain – a research and diagnostic tool that could one day revolutionize brain healthcare.Baycrest cognitive neuroscientists collaborated with artists and gaming and wearable technology industry partners for over a year to create the My Virtual Dream installation. Partners included the University of Toronto, Scotiabank Nuit Blanche, Muse™ and Uken Games.Plans are underway to travel My Virtual Dream to other cities around the world. Share on Twitter Email Share Share on Facebookcenter_img Pinterest Neuroscientists in Toronto have shown that crowdsourcing brain data with hundreds of adults in a short period of time could be a new frontier in neuroscience and lead to new insights about the brain.Dr. Natasha Kovacevic of Baycrest Health Sciences’ Rotman Research Institute is the lead author of a scientific paper on the crowdsourcing experiment — “My Virtual Dream: Collective Neurofeedback in an Immersive Art Environment” — published online today in the journal PLOS ONE.More than 500 adults aged 18 and older participated in the experiment at the 2013 Scotiabank Nuit Blanche arts event in Toronto. Baycrest, in partnership with the University of Toronto and industry partners, created a large-scale art-science installation called My Virtual Dream. Festival-goers were invited to wear a Muse™ wireless electroencephalography (EEG) headband and participate in a brief collective neurofeedback experience in groups of 20 inside a 60-foot geodesic dome. The group’s collective EEG signals triggered a specific catalogue of artistic imagery displayed on the dome’s 360-degree interior, along with spontaneous musical interpretation by live musicians on stage. LinkedInlast_img read more

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Pandemic flu keeps strong grip on US

first_imgNov 6, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – Pandemic flu activity continues its vigorous spread across the United States, with 48 states experiencing widespread activity and reports of 18 more deaths in children, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said today.Though the number of doctor’s visits from flulike illnesses decreased slightly from the previous week from 8% of patient visits to 7,7%, it’s difficult to tell if the activity is peaking, said Anne Schuchat, MD, director of the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, at a media briefing today. She noted that activity waxes and wanes in different areas from week to week.The CDC weekly flu surveillance report released today, which covers the week ending Oct 31, revealed:Lab-confirmed flu hospitalizations continued to climb.Pneumonia and influenza mortality rates increased for the fifth week in a row.More than 99% of subtyped flu viruses reported to the CDC were the pandemic H1N1 virus.Two seasonal H3N2 viruses that the CDC has received since Sep 1 were related to the Perth strain that is not included in the Northern Hemisphere’s seasonal flu vaccine, but is a component of the Southern Hemisphere’s vaccine, and the CDC has said it is too early to predict if circulating seasonal strains will be a good match with the seasonal vaccine.So far manufacturers have made 38 million doses of pandemic H1N1 vaccine available to states, which is up 11 million doses from a week ago, she said. Most of the vaccine shipments coming out now are the injectable version, with about one-third of the supply as the inhaled version.The more plentiful shipments of injectable vaccine come as good news for public health officials who are scrambling to vaccinate high-risk groups first. The inhaled version, which made up most of the earliest doses, is contraindicated for many vulnerable groups, such as pregnant women and children younger than age 2.Though Schuchat held off on making longer-range vaccine output projections, she said if everything goes smoothly an additional 8 million doses should become available to states over the next week.Getting vaccine to at-risk peopleIn response to reports that some corporate clinics have received some supplies of pandemic vaccine to distribute to employees, Schuchat said state and local officials are working hard to put the vaccine in the path of high-risk patients, even if that means putting it in a setting where they can easily get the vaccine at their workplace clinic. Yesterday the New York Times and other media outlets reported that New York City health officials distributed small amounts to businesses, including to some Wall Street firms.The story has prompted anger and speculation that businesses might use their doses for executives and others that are not in high-risk groups. Yesterday the CDC sent a letter to state health departments reminding them to target scarce vaccine doses to high-risk patients. Schuchat did not directly link the letter to reports of businesses receiving vaccine doses.She added that over the past several years, businesses have been instrumental in getting seasonal vaccine into the arms of Americans. She said states are using a range of strategies for getting the vaccine to high-risk groups.For example, she singled out a drive-up vaccination clinic that public health officials in the Champaign-Urbana, Ill., area are using to deliver doses to children with special needs.However, Schuchat said CDC officials acknowledge that the slow flow of pandemic vaccine has hampered state and local efforts to direct patients to the shots. Today a poll from the Harvard School of Public Health showed that only half of adults were able to determine where to get the vaccine.Since vaccine campaigns launched in October, only a third of parents who tried to get their children vaccinated were able to do so, and only about one third of high-risk adults were able to find doses for themselves.Schuchat said the good news in the Harvard survey was that 91% of those who attempted unsuccessfully to find the vaccine said they would try again to get it. The Harvard survey, part of an ongoing series, was based on a national sample of 1,073 adults.Antiviral optionsThough the scarce supply of vaccine in the face of such widespread flu activity is frustrating, Schuchat said antivirals are another very effective tool in fighting the virus. Today the CDC e-mailed a health advisory to clinicians reminding them that it’s not too late to start a patient on antiviral treatment, even if their symptoms began more than 48 hours prior, which has been the optimal treatment window.Those who benefit from even later treatment with antivirals include not just hospitalized patients, but also outpatients with underlying health conditions and any moderately ill patient who appears to be getting worse.People without risk factors can also benefit from treatment, the CDC said, pointing out that 40% of children and 20% of adults who were hospitalized with pandemic H1N1 infections did not have underlying risk factors.The CDC also reiterated that antiviral treatment should be started empirically in patients with suspected infections, without waiting for laboratory confirmation.See also:Nov 6 CDC weekly flu surveillance updateNov 6 Harvard School of Public Health press releaselast_img read more

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Santa Fe Community College And Higher Education Center Closed Through April 5 … Events Canceled Through April 10

first_imgSanta Fe Community College at 6401 Richards Ave., in Santa Fe. Courtesy/SFCCSFCC News:SANTA FE – Santa Fe Community College and Santa Fe Higher Education Center are following Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham’s recommendation to reduce the spread of Coronavirus and have closed. SFCC, Kids Campus and the Higher Education Center are closed for spring break through Sunday March 22. Both campuses will be closed Monday, March 23 through Sunday April 5 to further prevent the virus from impacting community members. All events are canceled; there is no access to either campus.After spring break, beginning March 23:All online classes will continue as scheduled;Some classes and student services will resume remotely;Faculty and staff will be available for students;Students should contact their instructors;Students should check email and the college’s Coronavirus website sfcc.edu/covid regularly; andStudent employees, faculty and staff will be paid and do not have to take leave.Here is a partial listing of events that have been canceled:March 25: U.S. Naturalization ceremony;March 25: sj Miller, talk in the SFCC library;March 25: Yolanda Nava talk for Women’s History Month;March 25: SFCC Governing Board Meeting;March 25, 26, 27: New Mexico Workforce Connection;March 26: Ageless Living event;March 27: SFCC/UNM Advisors Summit;April 1, 2 and 3: TRiO Spring Summit;April 4 and 5: Gerald Clay Basketball Tournament; andAll planetarium shows through April 10.This event is postponed:March 29: Sunday Morning Brunch for Student Scholarships at Santa Fe School of Cooking. Contact Santa Fe School of Cooking at 505.983.4511 to obtain a refund, guarantee attendance at the rescheduled event, date TBD, or donate your refund to the SFCC Foundation in support of SFCC’s Adult Education program.The college encourages everyone to follow the New Mexico Department of Health Coronavirus Recommendations. This is a developing situation and the college continues to plan and adapt to changing circumstances. About SFCCFor more than 35 years, Santa Fe Community College has been the gateway to success for individuals and the community by providing affordable, high quality educational programs that serve the social, cultural, technological and economic needs of a diverse community. SFCC is a Best for Vets and a Military Friendly school. The college serves more than 15,000 students per year in its credit, noncredit and adult programs. For further information, visit sfcc.edu or call 505.428.1000.last_img read more

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