Dominica’s CCJ Accession Ceremony Today

first_img National Coordinating Committee chairman denies public… In a Statement in the run-up to today’event, the CCJ President said the Court welcomed Dominica’s historic move and was ready to  become the final court of appeal to  the country’speople. “While being accessed by only three other Caribbean States, the CCJ’s Appellate Jurisdiction is quite robust as it has produced close to ninety percent of the Court’s judicial output. With ten years already on its heels, the CCJ stands ready to serve the people of Dominica in providing greater accessibility to final justice in a manner that engenders the public’s thrust and confidence in judicial services,” Sir Denis said in his statement. Today’s accession ceremony will be streamed live at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tyhsp2-Kj4M [su_box title=”The Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ)” style=”soft” box_color=”#54c0f0″]The CCJ was inaugurated on 16 April, 2005 in Trinidad and Tobago where it is headquartered. Its central role is providing legal certainty to the operations of the CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME). It is structured to have two jurisdictions – an original and an appellate. In its original jurisdiction it ensures uniform interpretation and application of the Revised Treaty of Chaguaramas, thereby underpinning and advancing the CARICOM Single Market and Economy. As the final court of appeal for Member States of the Caribbean Community it fosters the development of an indigenous Caribbean jurisprudence[/su_box] Jun 19, 2019 Jun 11, 2020 Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… Oct 3, 2018 COVID-19: CCJ takes safety measures CCJ Upholds COTED Decision on Cement Tariff Increase Dominica’s CCJ Accession Ceremony – in photosThere was a mood of celebration in Roseau Friday during an official ceremony to mark Dominica’s replacement of the London-based Privy Council with the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) as its final Court of Appeal. Dominica became the fourth country to accede to  the CCJ’s appellate jurisdiction, joining Barbados, Guyana…March 6, 2015In “CARICOM”Dominica accedes to CCJ Appellate jurisdiction tomorrow; event to be live-streamedRoseau, Dominica -The ceremony to mark Dominica’s accession to the appellate jurisdiction of the Caribbean Court of Justice is set for Friday, March 6, 2015. The ceremony will begin from 10:00am and will be held at the State House Conference Centre. President of Dominica H.E. Charles A Savarin, Prime Minister…March 5, 2015In “Barbados”CCJ welcomes Dominica’s historic moveFurther to the recent announcement made by The Honourable Roosevelt Skerrit, Prime Minister of Dominica, the President of the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ), The Right Honourable Sir Charles Michael Dennis Byron, has issued the following statement: The Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) has noted the announcement by the Honourable Mr. Roosevelt Skerrit, Prime…January 28, 2015In “CARICOM”Share this on WhatsApp Mar 18, 2020 You may be interested in… President of the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ) Rt. Hon. Sir Denis Byron President of the Caribbean Court of Justice Rt. Hon. Sir Dennis Byron and other Judges of the Court will attend the ceremony to mark the accession of the Commonwealth of Dominica to the Appellate Jurisdiction of the CCJ today, Friday 6 March 2015. CARICOM Secretary-General Ambassador Irwin LaRocque will also attend the Ceremony which will be held at the Dominica State House Conference Centre at Roseau, from 10:00 am. CARICOM Secretary-General meets Guyana’s President last_img read more

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UPDATE on Hurricane Dorian and The Bahamas Tragedy

first_img Sep 9, 2019 Overview     As we write this blog,  it is clear that Hurricane Dorian has created havoc in The Bahamas with consequences for the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) as a whole. Preliminary reports indicate that five  people are confirmed to have died in the storm; storm surges of 12 to 18 feet (4-5 meters) above normal hit  Grand Bahama Island and up to 13,000 homes have been destroyed or severely damaged. Prime Minister, Hubert Minnis, described the impact of the hurricane as a “historic tragedy in parts of our northern Bahamas’. For this, we at GOFAD join others in the CARICOM Region and around the world in expressions of sympathy and solidarity to the Prime Minister and the people of the Bahamas. WATCH: Dorian batters the Bahamas, killing fiveThe frequency and severity of these catastrophic events are  illustrations of the vulnerability of the Caribbean. Since 1950 approximately  300 natural disasters have hit the region, killed some 250,000 people and affected more than 24 million through injury, death, or loss of homes and livelihoods.  According the World Development Report (2014), the Caribbean islands are among the 25 most-vulnerable nations in terms of disasters per-capita or land area, with their frequency and damages exceeding those for other small and larger states. An  IMF study (2016) found seven Caribbean islands are at extreme or high risk of natural disasters, with vulnerability gauged by disaster frequency and impact.  It shows that in many cases disaster damages exceed the size of the economy. This is borne out by more recent events. For Dominica, after the category 5 Hurricane Maria hit the region in September 2017, damages were estimated to be more than 200 percent of its GDP.  Consequences such as those  resulting from natural disasters in The Bahamas and Dominica are part of a wider problem identified in the Sustainable  Development Goal (SDG) #13, which focuses on climate action that rolls out several targets. Greenhouse gas emissions are more than 50 percent higher than in 1990.  As a result, global warming is contributing to the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events such as heat waves, droughts, floods and tropical cyclones. These in turn aggravate water management problems, reduce agricultural production and food security, increase health risks, damage critical infrastructure and interrupt the provision of basic services such as water, sanitation, education, energy and transport. Managing Risks and Increasing Resilience  The two interrelated pillars for dealing with these challenges are managing risks and  increasing resilience to adverse shocks. They combine to prepare for risk with the ability to cope afterward. They forestall climate-related disaster  migration, which is a serious impediment to growth. They facilitate macroeconomic and development goals which allow countries to break-free from the vicious cycle of high debt and low growth prevalence. They reduce the massive reconstruction costs  that take away scarce resources from social spending. Analysis shows that Dominica may have lost more than a decade of development, as measured by real GDP per capita, following Hurricane Maria in 2017. Striving for Resilience  The aspirational goal enunciated by Prime Minister Roosevelt  Skerrit to make Dominica the first climate resilient country in the World is a laudable one.  It requires three complementary building blocks of effective risk management. These are: Sep 5, 2019 Greenhouse gas emissions are more than 50 percent higher than in 1990.  As a result, global warming is contributing to the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events such as heat waves, droughts, floods and tropical cyclones. You may be interested in…  The Caribbean islands are among the 25 most-vulnerable nations in terms of disasters per-capita or land area, with their frequency and damages exceeding those for other small and larger states (World Development Report (2014) Sep 6, 2019 Two interrelated pillars for dealing with these challenges: managing risks and  increasing resilience to adverse shocks. They combine to prepare for risk with the ability to cope afterward. They forestall climate-related disaster  migration, which is a serious impediment to growth. Striving for resilience –Investing  in early warning systems and resilient infrastructure, with appropriate land-use, zoning rules, building codes and adequate social-safety nets; building  financial resilience to mitigate economic costs of disasters, including through risk-transfer tools, such as insurance; accelerating  financing access, and contingency planning Investing  in early warning systems and resilient infrastructure, with appropriate land-use, zoning rules,  building codes and adequate social-safety nets.Building  financial resilience to mitigate economic costs of disasters, including through risk-transfer tools, such as insurance.Accelerating  financing access, and contingency planning. These building blocks  for sustainable resilience require international investments such as the Marshal Plan for the Caribbean proposed after Hurricane Maria, but which has not come to fruition. Upfront costs of resilient infrastructure are high. They are estimated to be around 25 percent higher than regular infrastructure. Resilient structures mitigate destruction and losses from natural disasters, but do not eliminate them. As a result,  limited national fiscal buffers are major barriers. When compounded by limited flows of global funds for adaptation (UNEP 2016) and limited capacity constraints to meet complex access requirements for climate funds, they contribute setbacks to resilience, which is the Caribbean reality.  But this need not be the case. Exploring innovative strategies will be the focus of our next blog. http://www.globalonefrontier.org/blog/hurricane-dorian-and-the-bahamas-tragedy-trigger-perspectives-on-achieving-climate-resilience Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… (After a Summer’s break of four weeks, GOFAD has resumed its weekly blogs. This week we initiate a discussion of Climate Resilience triggered by the “Bahamas Tragedy” caused by Hurricane Dorian.)center_img Some takeaways Govt to discuss evacuations of Abaco, GB OPM: More than 900 officers sent to Abaco, GB Sep 6, 2019 (GOFAD, 6 September 2019) Since this Blog was written on Tuesday September 3, the death toll has risen to 30 and the extend of the damage is captured in the video link below . According to Dr Duane Sands , Minister of Health the mortality rate is likely to be much higher as many are still reported as missing. In the meantime CARICOM through its regional institution CDEMA has been involved in the rescue mission supported by the USA and Canadian Governments. St Lucia’s Prime Minister Allen Chastanet, current Chair of CARICOM and Barbados Prime Minister Mia Motley , with responsibility for the Caribbean Single Market and Economy (CSME) have already led a delegation to the Bahamas while Jamaica, Barbados and Trinidad and Tobago are dispatching Teams to assist with the rescue and rehabilitation process Therese Turner Jones General Manager of the Caribbean Department InterAmerican Development Bank ( IDB ) says that the multilateral agency has stepped forward to help the Bahamas, through its grant facility for humanitarian assistance which is available immediately. In addition she disclosed that IDB has approved a US$ 100M credit line “exactly for this purpose so, in the event of a disaster, it triggers the drawdown of the credit line.”Video link:https://video.foxnews.com/v/6083856236001/ ————————————–Subject: GOFAD Blog: Dorian, The Bahamas and Climate Resilience–Sept. 6, 2019 Aid rising for hurricane-ravaged Bahamas CARICOM Chairman Leads Delegation to The Bahamas Seven Caribbean islands are at extreme or high risk of natural disasters, with vulnerability gauged by disaster frequency and impact.  It shows that in many cases disaster damages exceed the size of the economy. (IMF study (2016)) CARICOM’s advocacy for resilience financing intensifies; optimism in Finland’s support(CARICOM Secretariat, 12 September 2019) The Caribbean Community (CARICOM) has reiterated its call for international financial institutions to accept that the vulnerability of Small Island and low-lying coastal Developing States (SIDS), should be the main criterion for eligibility for concessional development financing, instead of GDP per capita. As yet another…September 12, 2019In “Event”Message from CARICOM Chairman Honourable Allen M. Chastanet on the situation in The Bahamas regarding Hurricane DorianToday, the hearts of the people of the Caribbean are heavy.  Once again one of our Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Member States has been devastated by a dangerous hurricane as our Region continues to experience the effects of climate change. Initial reports from The Bahamas indicate that the country has taken…September 3, 2019In “Antigua & Barbuda”PM Minnis: Government to review pledges, make decisions in best interest of The Bahamas(Bahamas Information Services Press Release) It is up to the Government to carefully review the pledges received at the recent Hurricane Dorian Pledging Conference and decide what is best for The Bahamas and for the people and communities in affected areas, Prime Minister the Most Hon. Dr. Hubert Minnis said today…January 21, 2020In “CARICOM”Share this on WhatsApplast_img read more

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US/CARICOM Relations: WTO CBI waiver secured, but …

first_img Mar 20, 2015 Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act gets US Senate nod… CARICOM/USA Relations: What of CBI?By Elizabeth Morgan, Specialist in International Trade Policy and International Politics You will recall from previous articles that the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI) comprises the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act (CBERA) and the Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act (CBPTA). CBERA’s duration is indefinite, but CBPTA, which amends provisions of CBERA,…June 7, 2019In “CARICOM”US/CARICOM Trade: Caribbean support required for Bill to extend Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI)By Elizabeth Morgan Countries of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) continue to export goods to the USA under the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI) comprising the 1983/1990 Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act (CBERA) and the 2000 Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act (CBTPA), which grant duty free access to the US market for…February 20, 2019In “Featured”Opinion: Caribbean should assess US approach to unilateral preferential trade arrangementsBY Elizabeth Morgan Since the start of this year, on several occasions US President Donald Trump has said that his favourite words are “reciprocal” and “reciprocity”. In trade, reciprocal means that both parties in a trade arrangement exchange preferential concessions for market access. Non-reciprocal means that only one party (the…September 14, 2018In “Business”Share this on WhatsApp Feb 20, 2019 CARICOM/US Relations: a chequered trade history Jun 13, 2019 US/CARICOM Trade: Caribbean support required for Bill to… center_img You may be interested in… Oct 5, 2020 By Elizabeth Morgan The US request for the Most Favoured Nation (MFN) waiver for the Caribbean Basin Initiative (CBI) was approved at the General Council Meeting of the World Trade Organization (WTO) held October 15-16. The CBI comprises the Caribbean Basin Economic Recovery Act (CBERA) and the Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act (CBPTA).The waiver, which gives legitimacy to the CBERA/CBPTA in the WTO, is for 6 years to end on 30th September 2025. Members of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), now the principal beneficiaries, welcomed the waiver approval and thanked the US administration for securing it. Obama’s visit a once-in-a- lifetime opportunity The CBPTA, however, expires on 30th September 2020. In February, a bipartisan Bill to extend CBERA/CBTPA was again tabled in the US House of Representatives by Representative Teri Sewell (D-Al). At the time, I suggested that it would have been better to obtain the extension and, thereafter, request the waiver. At the US/CARICOM Trade and Investment Council Meeting in June, officials of the Office of the US Trade Representative (USTR) signaled their intention to request the waiver. There is still no further movement on this Bill in the House. Senator Johnny Isakson (R-GA) tabled a similar Bill in the Senate on September 12.  As the CBPTA expires in September 2020, I believe that there isn’t the urge to expedite adoption of this Bill. After all, the Congress is seized with far more important and pressing matters. I understand that the CARICOM Caucus of Ambassadors in Washington DC, with support from Caribbean interest groups, is continuing to lobby for the Bill’s adoption. The impact of Hurricane Dorian in the Bahamas and the situation in Haiti may strengthen the cause. In looking at this issue, I like to consider the bigger picture including the US position in the WTO on the development status of developing members proposing differentiation and graduation from special and differential treatment (S&DT) flexibilities. I also look at overall US/CARICOM relations, which, I gather, are actually not as tepid as appears.  There has been some movement in the implementation of the 2016 US/Caribbean Strategic Engagement Act and its related 2017 Strategy under priority areas such as energy and disaster relief. It remained unclear whether significant progress has been made under the priority area, ‘prosperity’, dealing with trade and investment and business and infrastructure development. However, following from the meeting of a group of CARICOM Heads with President Trump in March, a May 23 press release from the US Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) informed that a high level team visited the Bahamas, Jamaica, Haiti, St. Lucia and the Dominican Republic to explore investment opportunities in energy and other critical sectors and to strengthen relationships with key partners in fostering security and stability in the Western Hemisphere. I also noted that a US Small Enterprise Assistance Fund is partnering with Sagicor Investment to assist small and medium-sized enterprises in the Caribbean. Implementation of the 2017 Strategy is coordinated through the Department of State and US Agency for International Development (USAID). From what I am reading and seeing on television, it is not surprising that overall implementation is moving at a slower than normal pace. The Caribbean is supposed to be the US’ third border. The US is the region’s principal trading partner. In a recent press report, there was concern about Jamaica’s zero population rate if low birth and high migration levels continue on the same trajectory. I welcome the waiver in the WTO. But, as we endeavor to implement the UN Sustainable Development Goals, how wonderful it would be were the US to really partner with us to achieve these goals, by adopting the extension Bill and fully implementing the 2017 Strategy, creating a more secure and prosperous environment in our countries, allowing those at home and abroad to genuinely proclaim – a yah suh me live, a yah suh me luv, a yah suh suit me well nice!.  Submitted by Elizabeth Morgan, Specialist in International Trade Policy and International Politics Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… last_img read more

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BorgWarner Names David Brown to Board of Directors

first_imgLSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement DeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain. With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  CHICAGO — David Brown, president and CEO of Owens Corning, has been appointed to the BorgWarner board of directors. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement Brown joined Owens Corning in a sales and marketing capacity in 1978 and held a variety of positions with the company before being named president and CEO in April 2002. Owens Corning is a $5 billion world leader in building materials and composite systems and solutions. The company operates in more than 300 locations globally. A resident of Toledo, Ohio, Brown serves on the board of directors for the Toledo Museum of Art and the Dean’s Advisory Council for Purdue’s Krannert School of Management. He is a past board member of several industry associations including the Executive Committee of the North American Manufacturers Association. For more information about BorgWarner, visit: www.bwauto.com. _______________________________________ Click here to view the rest of today’s headlines.,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementlast_img read more

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Torvec Adds Two to Board of Directors

first_imgROCHESTER, NY — Automotive technology firm Torvec has elected Mary Ho and Philip Fain to its board of directors. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement Mary Ho is president of the China Millennium Council, a globally-recognized enterprise dedicated to fostering and developing innovative cultural, educational and community partnerships with China. A renowned expert in international negotiation, Ho has extensive experience in international public relations, corporate strategy development and transition management. Linking clients with their global counterparts in the U.S., China, the Pacific Rim, Central America and Europe, she develops cross-cultural business communication and diversity competency programs for CEO’s of Fortune 100 firms, business executives, governments, health care industries and academic institutions. Noted clients include B. Thomas Golisano, retired chairman and CEO of Paychex, Inc.; Thomas Watson, Jr., retired chairman and CEO of IBM; George M. C. Fisher, chairman of the National Academy of Engineering and retired chairman and CEO of Eastman Kodak; Xerox Corporation and Ford Motor Company. Ho also serves as a research associate professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology, College of Business, Center for International Business and Economic Growth. Her research and teaching focus on empowerment and alliances, multinational resolve and arbitration, and global ethics leadership. Philip Fain, Torvec’s CEO, was also named to the board. Fain was appointed CEO on March 3, 2005. For more information about Torvec, go to: www.torvec.com. _______________________________________ Click here to view the rest of today’s headlines.last_img read more

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2006 Arthur B. Modine Scholars Program Winners Announced

first_imgRACINE, WI — Modine Manufacturing Co. has announced the 2006 recipients of the Arthur B. Modine Scholars program, funded by the Modine Manufacturing Co. Charity Foundation. The scholarships are named after the engineer and inventor who founded Modine 90 years ago, Arthur B. Modine. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement These scholarships are available to children of full-time Modine employees at the corporate headquarters in Racine and at any of the 20 manufacturing facilities or Modine subsidiaries in the United States. The scholarships range from $1,000 to $2,500 per year for four years. Since 1976, Modine has awarded the scholarships on an annual basis, through the National Merit Scholarship Program. The National Merit Scholarship Corporation in Evanston, IL, an independent, not-for-profit organization whose purposes are to identify and honor talented high school students, selected the winners. It also determines the dollar amount of the awards. The scholarships originate from Modine’s core values of “Responsible Relationships,” by rewarding employees for their contributions to the success of the company, and “Corporate Citizenship,” by supporting the communities where our operations exist. “Modine is dedicated to continuously improving as a company. In the same way, we are dedicated to helping the children of our employee’s improve through higher education. The A.B. Modine Scholars Program gives us an opportunity to reward our employee’s children for their hard work, and gives these outstanding students assistance in pursuing their dreams,” said Dean Zakos, vice president, general counsel and secretary. The 2006 A.B. Modine Scholars are: Matthew Brune, son of Lawrence Brune, Materials Manager in Camdenton, MO. Matthew graduated from Camdenton High School in Camdenton, MO. He will attend the University of Missouri, in Columbia, majoring in Civil Engineering. Advertisement Matthew Eggert, son of Jeffery Eggert, Mechanical Engineer in Racine, graduated from Tremper High School in Kenosha, WI. Matthew plans to major in Aerospace Engineering at Purdue University. Justin Harris, son of John Harris, Director-Financial Accounting and Technical Analysis in Racine, WI, graduated from J.I. Case High School in Racine. He will study either actuarial science or biochemistry at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. Kevin Konieczko, son of Michael Konieczko, Tool and Cost Estimator in Racine, graduated from Washington Park High School in Racine. Kevin will attend the University of Wisconsin in Madison where he will major in biochemistry. Nicholas Pilger, son of Mike Pilger, Marketing and Advertising Manager in Racine, graduated from William Horlick High School in Racine. Nick will major in Business at the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities in Minneapolis, MN. Allyson Walker, daughter of Patrick Walker, Plant Superintendent in Jefferson, MO, graduated from Southern Boone High School in Ashland, MO. She will attend the University of Missouri at Kansas City where she will major in American Studies. Xin Ying, son of Jianmin Yin Ph.D., Senior Technical Advisor in Racine. Xin graduated from Mary D. Bradford Senior High School in Kenosha, WI and will study either Material Science or Chemical Engineering at The School of Engineering and Applied Science at Northwestern University. Advertisement For information about Modine, visit: www.modine.com . _______________________________________ Click here to view the rest of today’s headlines.last_img read more

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Letter To The Editor: Offering An Olive Branch To The Polaris Charter School Governing Board

first_imgBy Superintendent Kurt SteinhausLos Alamos Public SchoolsCongratulations on working together to complete your 338-page application. It is clear that you have worked very hard on what may seem like a dissertation without the associated degree.  Your grassroots work is to be commended. In reading the proposed Polaris plan, I can see many good ideas and educational approaches. I resonate with the idea of using formative assessments to develop a growth mindset for student learning.This letter is to send an open invitation to meet and work together. After all, Los Alamos is a small town and we want what is best for every child in our community. Whether the Charter is approved or not, it would be great to open a line of communication, share approaches, and maximize the very limited education resources available in our community. We may even want to hold a community meeting to seek additional input from students and parents.I know and respect every member of the proposed Polaris Governing Board and it seems like we could work together on creative and innovative approaches. For example, since Polaris does not have a school counselor, we can schedule joint workshops through our Healthy Schools Initiative. Let’s talk. If helpful, I can contact Liz Martineau to find a time to “roll up our sleeves” and get to work for students.last_img read more

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Rosalie Heller Annual Memorial Lecture Oct. 23

first_imgRosalie Heller was a major contributor to the arts in Los Alamos. Courtesy photoLAAC News:Los Alamos Arts Council presents the second “Rosalie Heller Annual Memorial Lecture.” This event is to honor the many contributions of Heller to life and music in Los Alamos.The speaker this year is writer, lecturer and curator James M Keller. He will present his talk, “Living Within Our Music,” at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 23 in the Pajarito Room at Fuller Lodge. A light reception will follow the lecture. Heller made major contributions to classical music in Los Alamos. She taught and inspired more than 300 pupils from age 5 to 95. Heller was a gifted pianist and performed at more than 100 chamber music concerts in Northern New Mexico.She gave a series of eight well attended evening lectures on classical music in Fuller Lodge, served as a radio host for more than 10 years and created a variety of programs. During her 17 years as Artistic Director of the Los Alamos Concert Association, many outstanding artists and programs were brought to Los Alamos. Keller is in his 25th season with the New York Philharmonic, where he occupies an endowed chair as its Program Annotator. He is also the Program Annotator of the San Francisco Symphony, a position he has held since 2000. His book Chamber Music: A Listener’s Guide, was spotlighted as “book of the month” and a “five stars book choice” by BBC Music Magazine. In 1999 he was awarded the prestigious ASCAP¬–Deems Taylor Award for his feature writing in Chamber Music magazine.From 2010 to 2019, Keller was a staff writer and critic-at-large at Pasatiempo, the weekly arts and culture magazine of The Santa Fe New Mexican.Admission is free to the lecture and it is open to anyone age 12 and older. The Los Alamos Arts Council, a 501c3 non-profit corporation and public charity that, for 50 years, has been supporting creative arts activities in Los Alamos, as well as Leon, Peter, and Tony Heller.For more information, visit losalamosartscouncil.org or call 505.663.0477.last_img read more

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NMMSH: Free Launch Pad Lecture On Comets Jan. 3

first_imgComet Bennet was discovered Dec. 28, 1969 by John Caister Bennett in Pretoria, South Africa. It was widely visible by April 1970 and was slated to be photographed April 14 from Apollo 13, but a critical malfunction in the spacecraft prevented the crew from taking the photos. Courtesy/britastro.orgNMMSH News:ALAMOGORDO – From early effects on world history to intergalactic interlopers, take a fascinating look at the sometimes terrifying but always beautiful and fascinating world of comets.Harbingers of doom in the past, comets today provide a fascinating look into the early days of the formation of our solar system as well as a glimpse into the deep, cold and unknown regions of our own galaxy and beyond.The New Mexico Museum of Space History in Alamogordo is hosting its first Launch Pad Lecture of the new year, Comets: Nomads of the Solar System, at 9 a.m. Friday, Jan. 3, on the museum’s first floor.The Launch Pad Lecture is free to the public and is held at 9 a.m. the first Friday of each month on the Museum’s first floor. Coffee and donuts are compliments of the International Space Hall of Fame Foundation. The next Launch Pad Lecture will be Feb. 7, and the subject will be the 90th Anniversary of the discovery of Pluto. A special guest speaker is pending.The Launch Pad Lectures are streamed live on Periscope and are also available after the lecture on the museum’s YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2SirhgX3NsxcREfOVLjHeA.The New Mexico Museum of Space History, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is a division of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information, call 575.437.2840 or toll free 1.877.333.6589 or visit the website at www.nmspacemuseum.org. Like us at: www.facebook.com/NMSpaceMuseum/About the New Mexico Museum of Space History: www.nmspacemuseum.orgThe New Mexico Museum of Space History in Alamogordo is a division of the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs, under the leadership of the Governor’s Commission to the New Mexico Museum of Space History. Programs and exhibits are supported by the International Space Hall of Fame Foundation through the generous support of donors.Dedicated Oct. 5, 1976, as the International Space Hall of Fame, the New Mexico Museum of Space History’s mission is to inspire and educate, to promote and preserve, and to honor the pioneers of space exploration.A Smithsonian Affiliate, the museum is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums (AAM), and stresses the significant role that the state of New Mexico has played in the development of the U.S. Space Program through collecting, preserving, and interpreting significant artifacts relevant to the history of space. The museum campus facility includes: the Museum of Space History, International Space Hall of Fame, John P. Stapp Air & Space Park, Daisy Track, Clyde W. Tombaugh Education Center, New Horizons Dome Theater and Planetarium, Astronaut Memorial Garden, Hubbard Space Science Research Building, and Museum Support Center.3198 State Route 2001 | Alamogordo, NM 88310 (Mailing: PO Box 5430, Alamogordo, NM 88311-5430) For more information: 575.437.2840 or toll free 1.877.333.6589. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday and Wednesday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday (closed Tuesday), closed on Thanksgiving and Christmas Day. Events, news releases and images about activities at the New Mexico Museum of Space History and other divisions in the Department of Cultural Affairs can be accessed at www.media.newmexicoculture.org.last_img read more

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Santa Fe Community College And Higher Education Center Closed Through April 5 … Events Canceled Through April 10

first_imgSanta Fe Community College at 6401 Richards Ave., in Santa Fe. Courtesy/SFCCSFCC News:SANTA FE – Santa Fe Community College and Santa Fe Higher Education Center are following Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham’s recommendation to reduce the spread of Coronavirus and have closed. SFCC, Kids Campus and the Higher Education Center are closed for spring break through Sunday March 22. Both campuses will be closed Monday, March 23 through Sunday April 5 to further prevent the virus from impacting community members. All events are canceled; there is no access to either campus.After spring break, beginning March 23:All online classes will continue as scheduled;Some classes and student services will resume remotely;Faculty and staff will be available for students;Students should contact their instructors;Students should check email and the college’s Coronavirus website sfcc.edu/covid regularly; andStudent employees, faculty and staff will be paid and do not have to take leave.Here is a partial listing of events that have been canceled:March 25: U.S. Naturalization ceremony;March 25: sj Miller, talk in the SFCC library;March 25: Yolanda Nava talk for Women’s History Month;March 25: SFCC Governing Board Meeting;March 25, 26, 27: New Mexico Workforce Connection;March 26: Ageless Living event;March 27: SFCC/UNM Advisors Summit;April 1, 2 and 3: TRiO Spring Summit;April 4 and 5: Gerald Clay Basketball Tournament; andAll planetarium shows through April 10.This event is postponed:March 29: Sunday Morning Brunch for Student Scholarships at Santa Fe School of Cooking. Contact Santa Fe School of Cooking at 505.983.4511 to obtain a refund, guarantee attendance at the rescheduled event, date TBD, or donate your refund to the SFCC Foundation in support of SFCC’s Adult Education program.The college encourages everyone to follow the New Mexico Department of Health Coronavirus Recommendations. This is a developing situation and the college continues to plan and adapt to changing circumstances. About SFCCFor more than 35 years, Santa Fe Community College has been the gateway to success for individuals and the community by providing affordable, high quality educational programs that serve the social, cultural, technological and economic needs of a diverse community. SFCC is a Best for Vets and a Military Friendly school. The college serves more than 15,000 students per year in its credit, noncredit and adult programs. For further information, visit sfcc.edu or call 505.428.1000.last_img read more

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