Psychedelics seem to alter social cognition by modifying facial emotion recognition

first_imgShare on Facebook Share Pinterest Share on Twitter Psychedelic drugs like LSD reduce the recognition of negative facial emotions by altering activity the amygdala, a brain region known to be important for responses to threatening situations, according to a systematic review published in Therapeutic Advances in Psychopharmacology.“We have been investigating the effects of ayahuasca on humans in the last 15 years. It seems that its effects — and the effects of other serotonergic hallucinogens such as LSD and psilocybin — involve modifications of emotional processing, which could contribute to its therapeutic effects on depression and anxiety,” said study author Rafael Guimarães dos Santos, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Sao Paulo.The researchers examined two previous studies on LSD and five previous studies on psilocybin. All seven experimental studies evaluated the recognition of facial expressions.center_img Email LinkedIn “Our most consistent finding was that these drugs reduced the recognition of negative emotions and modulated amygdala activity to these stimuli. This effect was correlated with antidepressive effects in depressed patients, but since this was observed only in a single study with an open-label design, it is difficult to conclude if this result has any clinical relevance,” the researchers explained in their review.Previous research has also indicated that individuals suffering from anxiety disorders and depression tend to have an bias in favor of the recognition of negative facial emotions. Reducing the recognition of negative facial emotions could in theory help treat those conditions.“Altering emotional processing by modifying facial emotion recognition could be one of the mechanisms involved in the therapeutic potentials of ayahuasca and other serotonergic hallucinogens.” Santos told PsyPost.“Indeed, the studies reviewed showed that a single dose or a few doses of LSD or psilocybin was associated with a modified pattern of recognition of negative emotions that could be interpreted as beneficial, since several of these studies showed that these modifications were correlated with increases in positive mood and/or anxiolytic and antidepressant effects,” the researchers wrote.Santos noted, however, that his team of researchers were only able to find a relatively small number of studies on the topic — and those studies had small sample sizes.The article, “Serotonergic hallucinogens and recognition of facial emotion expressions: a systematic review of the literature“, was authored by Juliana M. Rocha, Flávia L. Osório, José Alexandre S. Crippa, José Carlos Bouso, Giordano N. Rossi, Jaime E. C. Hallak, and Rafael G. dos Santos.last_img read more

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Reports detail risk of seizures in kids after flu vaccination

first_imgFeb 27, 2012 (CIDRAP News) – A recent set of articles in Vaccine has confirmed previous preliminary reports that young children who received influenza shots in the 2010-11 flu season had a slightly increased risk of a febrile seizure after vaccination, especially if they received a new pneumococcal vaccine at the same time.In January 2011 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported a small increase in risk of febrile seizures in children aged 12 to 23 months who received a trivalent inactivated flu vaccine (TIV) and the new 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) on the same visit.The Vaccine reports cite a significant increase in risk of seizures in children 6 to 59 months old shortly after vaccination with TIV, even without concomitant PCV13 vaccination. The excess risk was highest in 16-month-old children who received both vaccines concomitantly. It amounted to about 45 additional febrile seizure cases per 100,000 TIV doses on the day of or day after vaccination (days 0 to 1), compared with a control period defined as 14 to 20 days after vaccination.A CDC official told CIDRAP News today that the number of febrile seizures in young children so far this flu season is about the same as last year.The CDC stepped up its surveillance for febrile seizures in children who received the flu vaccine in 2010-11 after Australia and New Zealand found an increase in such events in 2010. Officials there reported higher-than-expected rates of febrile seizures, mainly in children under age 5 who received Fluvax, made by CSL Ltd.The Vaccine articles include an initial report based on analysis of data from the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) and a study from the CDC’s Vaccine Safety Datalink System (VSD), which gathers medical visit data from 10 managed care organizations across the country, covering 9.2 million Americans. The two reports are accompanied by a “discussion” article about the CDC and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) responses to the findings.In the initial study, in the fall of 2010, CDC and FDA scientists examined VAERS data for signs of increased febrile seizures following TIV receipt in children younger than 5 years old. The number of such cases exceeded a predetermined threshold on Nov 23, and by Dec 10 the team had confirmed 43 febrile seizure cases after vaccination in children 6 to 23 months old.Most of the cases appeared to be “typical uncomplicated febrile seizures,” and all the children recovered. The CDC says febrile seizures in children are brief and generally have a good prognosis.In the VSD study, the authors compared the rate of postvaccination febrile seizures on days 0 to 1 after vaccination to the rate on days 14 to 20 in a cohort of 206,174 children aged 6 to 59 months. They found nearly a sixfold increase in risk—an incidence rate ratio (IRR) of 5.9 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.1-11.3)—for children who received TIV and PCV13 concomitantly.The increases in risk attributed to TIV or PCV13 separately were smaller, the report says. The IRR for TIV (adjusted for PCV13) was 2.4 (95% CI, 1.2 to 4.7), while the IRR for PCV13 (adjusted for TIV) was 2.5 (95% CI, 1.3 to 4.7).The risk estimates varied by age because of the varying baseline risk of seizures in young children, the report says. The peak increases, at age 16 months, were 12.5 per 100,000 doses for TIV without PCV13, 13.7 per 100,000 doses for PCV13 without TIV, and 44.9 per 100,000 doses for concomitant TIV and PCV13. The risk increase was lowest for 59-month-old children.Abbigail Tumpey, a spokeswoman for the CDC’s Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, said today that surveillance results on febrile seizures in young children so far this flu season are similar to last year’s.”What we are seeing this year is consistent with last year (e.g., the number/type of VAERS reports are the same),” she commented by e-mail. “This would be as expected, since the vaccine formulation is the same. The Vaccine Safety Datalink is going to do a retrospective analysis when the season is over.”The findings have not prompted any change in the federal recommendations for flu and pneumococcal vaccination in young children, but federal officials called for warnings to healthcare providers and parents, according to the discussion article. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended the warnings after a subcommittee studied the data.The prescribing information for Fluzone TIV was updated for this season to include “febrile convulsions” in the postmarketing experience section, says the report, and the Vaccine Information Statement for TIV was updated to include similar information. The package insert for PCV13 notes that febrile seizures were seen in vaccinees during prelicensure clinical trials, the article says.Leroy Z, Broder K, Menschik D, et al. Febrile seizures after 2010-11 influenza vaccine in young children, United States: a vaccine safety signal from the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Vaccine 2012 Mar;30(11):2020-23 [Abstract]Tse A, Tseng HF, Greene SK, et al. Signal identification and evaluation for risk of febrile seizures in children following trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine in the Vaccine Safety Datalink Project, 2010-2011. Vaccine 2012 Mar;30(11):2024-31 [Abstract]Broder KR, Martin DB, Vellozi C. Bridging the gap between data and public health needs. In the heat of a signal: responding to a vaccine safety signal for febrile seizures after 2010-11 influenza vaccine in young children, United States. (Discussion) Vaccine 2012 Mar;30(11):2032-4 [Citation]See also:Related Feb 23, 2011, CIDRAP News storylast_img read more

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Ebola expands in Guinea, shrinks in Sierra Leone

first_imgEbola trends in the outbreak region showed a mixed picture last week, with activity up a bit and cases popping up in a broader area in Guinea but with new cases decreasing further in Sierra Leone, the World Health Organization (WHO) said today in its latest update.Overall, the outbreak countries reported 82 lab-confirmed Ebola cases last week, up slightly from 79 the week before. With no new cases reported in Liberia, the latest infections include 57 in Guinea and 25 in Sierra Leone. The WHO said the outbreak total has now reached 25,178 confirmed, probable, and suspected cases, with the number of deaths increasing to 10,445.A spurt of health worker infections was reported last week, with seven in Guinea and one in Sierra Leone. The WHO said the number of healthcare worker infections is now at 861, which includes 495 deaths.Guinea, Sierra Leone pictures contrastGuinea, which has often reported fluctuating outbreak patterns, saw its number of confirmed cases increase from the 45 it reported the previous week. Geographic transmission of the disease also expanded last week, with two districts—Fria and Siguiri—reporting their first cases in more than 50 days. The WHO said Siguiri, which borders Mali, is the first district outside western Guinea to experience a confirmed case in over a month.A rapid response team has been sent to Fria, which reported three cases last week after having confirmed only two cases previously since the start of the outbreak, the WHO said.However, the main outbreak hot spots are in an area that includes Guinea and Sierra Leone’s capitals and their surrounding districts.Alongside Guinea’s rise in cases last week, response markers showed mixed signals. The percentage of Ebola deaths that occurred in the community increased from 27% to 43% over the past week, but the WHO said the rise might be linked to increased access to Forecariah district, an area that has been marked by community resistance over the past several months. The country’s count of unsafe burials, however, declined from the previous week.Today’s WHO report also included more details about Guinea’s recently announced 45-day emergency period, which was declared a few days ago for Conakry and five currently affected districts. The measures include movement restriction in transmission areas, temporary closure and quarantine of health facilities where Ebola cases have been detected, limiting burial attendance to close relatives, and testing all corpses for Ebola.Sierra Leone’s 25 Ebola cases last week, down from 33 the week before, represent the country’s fourth consecutive drop and the lowest weekly total since the final week of May 2014, according to the WHO. However, the country lost some ground with some response markers: the percentage of cases occurring in known contacts decreased, and the proportion of Ebola cases detected after death increased slightly, with half of those cases in from ambia district, which has faced community engagement struggles.On Mar 29 Sierra Leone wrapped up a 3-day lockdown of Ebola transmission areas to further limit the spread, and the WHO’s report has some details about the results. The number of suspected cases nearly doubled last week, with most of them coming during the final 2 days of the lockdown.Liberia reported no new cases, and 185 contacts of its most recent patient—a 45-year-old Monrovia woman who died from the disease on Mar 27—are still being monitored. Some media reports from Liberia had suggested that the country had two new Ebola cases, but no new confirmed cases have been reported to Mar 29, the WHO said.The country continues to test suspected cases, with 278 samples tested in the week to Mar 22.Other developmentsXinhua, China’s state news agency, today shared some details about MIL-77, an experimental Ebola drug that a British nurse recently received after she was flown home for treatment after she was infected while serving in Sierra Leone. She was the first Ebola patient known to have been treated with the drug. British experts told Xinhua that MIL-77 is an antibody cocktail similar to ZMapp, another experimental drug that has been used to treat several Ebola patients.Five healthcare workers who were taken to Nebraska Medical Center after potential exposure to Ebola while working in Sierra Leone have completed their 21-day active monitoring period and have left the Omaha area, the hospital said yesterday on its Twitter feed. It said a fifth patient who was hospitalized Mar 28 after a cardiac event experienced while jogging has been discharged from the hospital and will leave the area soon.See also:Apr 1 WHO Ebola updateApr 1 Xinhua storyNebraska Medical Center Twitter feedlast_img read more

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UPDATE on Hurricane Dorian and The Bahamas Tragedy

first_img Sep 9, 2019 Overview     As we write this blog,  it is clear that Hurricane Dorian has created havoc in The Bahamas with consequences for the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) as a whole. Preliminary reports indicate that five  people are confirmed to have died in the storm; storm surges of 12 to 18 feet (4-5 meters) above normal hit  Grand Bahama Island and up to 13,000 homes have been destroyed or severely damaged. Prime Minister, Hubert Minnis, described the impact of the hurricane as a “historic tragedy in parts of our northern Bahamas’. For this, we at GOFAD join others in the CARICOM Region and around the world in expressions of sympathy and solidarity to the Prime Minister and the people of the Bahamas. WATCH: Dorian batters the Bahamas, killing fiveThe frequency and severity of these catastrophic events are  illustrations of the vulnerability of the Caribbean. Since 1950 approximately  300 natural disasters have hit the region, killed some 250,000 people and affected more than 24 million through injury, death, or loss of homes and livelihoods.  According the World Development Report (2014), the Caribbean islands are among the 25 most-vulnerable nations in terms of disasters per-capita or land area, with their frequency and damages exceeding those for other small and larger states. An  IMF study (2016) found seven Caribbean islands are at extreme or high risk of natural disasters, with vulnerability gauged by disaster frequency and impact.  It shows that in many cases disaster damages exceed the size of the economy. This is borne out by more recent events. For Dominica, after the category 5 Hurricane Maria hit the region in September 2017, damages were estimated to be more than 200 percent of its GDP.  Consequences such as those  resulting from natural disasters in The Bahamas and Dominica are part of a wider problem identified in the Sustainable  Development Goal (SDG) #13, which focuses on climate action that rolls out several targets. Greenhouse gas emissions are more than 50 percent higher than in 1990.  As a result, global warming is contributing to the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events such as heat waves, droughts, floods and tropical cyclones. These in turn aggravate water management problems, reduce agricultural production and food security, increase health risks, damage critical infrastructure and interrupt the provision of basic services such as water, sanitation, education, energy and transport. Managing Risks and Increasing Resilience  The two interrelated pillars for dealing with these challenges are managing risks and  increasing resilience to adverse shocks. They combine to prepare for risk with the ability to cope afterward. They forestall climate-related disaster  migration, which is a serious impediment to growth. They facilitate macroeconomic and development goals which allow countries to break-free from the vicious cycle of high debt and low growth prevalence. They reduce the massive reconstruction costs  that take away scarce resources from social spending. Analysis shows that Dominica may have lost more than a decade of development, as measured by real GDP per capita, following Hurricane Maria in 2017. Striving for Resilience  The aspirational goal enunciated by Prime Minister Roosevelt  Skerrit to make Dominica the first climate resilient country in the World is a laudable one.  It requires three complementary building blocks of effective risk management. These are: Sep 5, 2019 Greenhouse gas emissions are more than 50 percent higher than in 1990.  As a result, global warming is contributing to the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events such as heat waves, droughts, floods and tropical cyclones. You may be interested in…  The Caribbean islands are among the 25 most-vulnerable nations in terms of disasters per-capita or land area, with their frequency and damages exceeding those for other small and larger states (World Development Report (2014) Sep 6, 2019 Two interrelated pillars for dealing with these challenges: managing risks and  increasing resilience to adverse shocks. They combine to prepare for risk with the ability to cope afterward. They forestall climate-related disaster  migration, which is a serious impediment to growth. Striving for resilience –Investing  in early warning systems and resilient infrastructure, with appropriate land-use, zoning rules, building codes and adequate social-safety nets; building  financial resilience to mitigate economic costs of disasters, including through risk-transfer tools, such as insurance; accelerating  financing access, and contingency planning Investing  in early warning systems and resilient infrastructure, with appropriate land-use, zoning rules,  building codes and adequate social-safety nets.Building  financial resilience to mitigate economic costs of disasters, including through risk-transfer tools, such as insurance.Accelerating  financing access, and contingency planning. These building blocks  for sustainable resilience require international investments such as the Marshal Plan for the Caribbean proposed after Hurricane Maria, but which has not come to fruition. Upfront costs of resilient infrastructure are high. They are estimated to be around 25 percent higher than regular infrastructure. Resilient structures mitigate destruction and losses from natural disasters, but do not eliminate them. As a result,  limited national fiscal buffers are major barriers. When compounded by limited flows of global funds for adaptation (UNEP 2016) and limited capacity constraints to meet complex access requirements for climate funds, they contribute setbacks to resilience, which is the Caribbean reality.  But this need not be the case. Exploring innovative strategies will be the focus of our next blog. http://www.globalonefrontier.org/blog/hurricane-dorian-and-the-bahamas-tragedy-trigger-perspectives-on-achieving-climate-resilience Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… (After a Summer’s break of four weeks, GOFAD has resumed its weekly blogs. This week we initiate a discussion of Climate Resilience triggered by the “Bahamas Tragedy” caused by Hurricane Dorian.)center_img Some takeaways Govt to discuss evacuations of Abaco, GB OPM: More than 900 officers sent to Abaco, GB Sep 6, 2019 (GOFAD, 6 September 2019) Since this Blog was written on Tuesday September 3, the death toll has risen to 30 and the extend of the damage is captured in the video link below . According to Dr Duane Sands , Minister of Health the mortality rate is likely to be much higher as many are still reported as missing. In the meantime CARICOM through its regional institution CDEMA has been involved in the rescue mission supported by the USA and Canadian Governments. St Lucia’s Prime Minister Allen Chastanet, current Chair of CARICOM and Barbados Prime Minister Mia Motley , with responsibility for the Caribbean Single Market and Economy (CSME) have already led a delegation to the Bahamas while Jamaica, Barbados and Trinidad and Tobago are dispatching Teams to assist with the rescue and rehabilitation process Therese Turner Jones General Manager of the Caribbean Department InterAmerican Development Bank ( IDB ) says that the multilateral agency has stepped forward to help the Bahamas, through its grant facility for humanitarian assistance which is available immediately. In addition she disclosed that IDB has approved a US$ 100M credit line “exactly for this purpose so, in the event of a disaster, it triggers the drawdown of the credit line.”Video link:https://video.foxnews.com/v/6083856236001/ ————————————–Subject: GOFAD Blog: Dorian, The Bahamas and Climate Resilience–Sept. 6, 2019 Aid rising for hurricane-ravaged Bahamas CARICOM Chairman Leads Delegation to The Bahamas Seven Caribbean islands are at extreme or high risk of natural disasters, with vulnerability gauged by disaster frequency and impact.  It shows that in many cases disaster damages exceed the size of the economy. (IMF study (2016)) CARICOM’s advocacy for resilience financing intensifies; optimism in Finland’s support(CARICOM Secretariat, 12 September 2019) The Caribbean Community (CARICOM) has reiterated its call for international financial institutions to accept that the vulnerability of Small Island and low-lying coastal Developing States (SIDS), should be the main criterion for eligibility for concessional development financing, instead of GDP per capita. As yet another…September 12, 2019In “Event”Message from CARICOM Chairman Honourable Allen M. Chastanet on the situation in The Bahamas regarding Hurricane DorianToday, the hearts of the people of the Caribbean are heavy.  Once again one of our Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Member States has been devastated by a dangerous hurricane as our Region continues to experience the effects of climate change. Initial reports from The Bahamas indicate that the country has taken…September 3, 2019In “Antigua & Barbuda”PM Minnis: Government to review pledges, make decisions in best interest of The Bahamas(Bahamas Information Services Press Release) It is up to the Government to carefully review the pledges received at the recent Hurricane Dorian Pledging Conference and decide what is best for The Bahamas and for the people and communities in affected areas, Prime Minister the Most Hon. Dr. Hubert Minnis said today…January 21, 2020In “CARICOM”Share this on WhatsApplast_img read more

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Maple Grove and De Vere sell off Cheshire asset

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Secondary £160m Empire up for sale

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Last Call: A de Kooning Contemporary At Duck Creek Arts Center

first_imgA vibrant, gesticular work by Elizabeth Parker.This week is your last chance to see the “long-lost” works of an important figure from the early years of the East End’s arts community. In a story line that feels plucked straight from the script of “National Treasure,” the Arts Center at Duck Creek in East Hampton is show-casing a set of noteworthy paintings by late Springs resident Elizabeth Ashton Parker that might never have seen the light again if it weren’t for an expedition to the attic of the Springs Library, where restoration is under way.Parker was the founder, with artist Alfonso Ossorio, of East Hampton’s first commercial art space, Signa Gallery, in 1957, where they displayed works by de Kooning, Franz Kline, Agnes Martin, and Philip Guston. She donated her own abstract, dynamic oils on canvas (along with her home, the 168-year-old Ambrose Parsons House on Old Stone Highway), 44 years ago to the Springs Library. “Elizabeth Parker: Library Paintings” is the first show to be mounted at the historic John Little Barn, newly reopenedas an exhibition space on the Duck Creek grounds.“The town was storing the paintings at the library and asked us to hold on to the work while they sorted out the building restoration,” Jessica Frost, the Center’s founder and director, said. “When we realized they were Parker’s, and remembered her connection to Signa Gallery and John Little, we decided to do a show. The exhibit highlights local history and hopefully will raise awareness of the plight of the library, and the need to restore that structure.”“Elizabeth Parker: Library Paintings” is free and open the public, and will remain on view through Sunday, May 26. Sharelast_img read more

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UK re-launches CCS competition

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Prayers for mosque murders

first_img 1 of 3 People from different religious backgrounds came out in support of human rights. Kulsum Griffiths, 9, Shaakirah Khan, 12, and Farzaanah Johnson, 14, sat quietly on the pavement outside the Aljaamia Uthmaania mosque in Bonteheuwel, to highlight human rights. Kulsum Griffiths, 9, Shaakirah Khan, 12, and Farzaanah Johnson, 14, sat quietly on the pavement outside the Aljaamia Uthmaania mosque in Bonteheuwel, to highlight human rights. The Bonteheuwel community gathered outside the Aljaamia Uthmaania mosque during Jumuah prayers on Friday March 22, in a show of support for Christchurch, New Zealand, where 50 people were killed at two mosques just the week before.The group gathered outside the Bonteheuwel mosque and held placards which highlighted human rights, like the right to practise religion freely.The human chain initiative was started by Claudia Groenmeyer, who mobilised the community for the #BonteheuwelinSolidaritywithChristchurchNZ campaign.Ms Groenmeyer said the news of the attacks was shocking.“I have raised two Muslim children. I have taught my children respect for self and respect for others. It is sad that in this day and age, people are not free. A place of worship is supposed to be safe,” she said.Ms Groenmeyer added that people’s mindset needed to be changed.“Tolerance is a big word, and once we get that right, everything else will fall into place,” she said.The campaign Ms Groenmeyer initiated, started on the same day as the shootings, and after reaching out to the Bonteheuwel Joint Peace Forum (JPF), the campaign was extended until Friday.The JPF approached the mosque committee to ask for permission for the campaign to be extended.A statement by the JPF reads: “The Joint Peace Forum takes this opportunity to thank Claudia Groenmeyer for doing a sterling job in initiating the #BonteheuwelinSolidaritywithChristchurchNZ campaign.“On Sunday March 17, the Joint Peace Forum consulted with the Aljaamia Uthmaania Mosque Committee, and got permission to extend the campaign to Friday March 22.” It continued: “This marks one week to the day of the vicious attack, condemned as a vile act of terror worldwide. “On Friday March 22, the JPF and the community of Bonteheuwel of all religions will have a human chain outside the Bonteheuwel mosque in solidarity with Christchurch, New Zealand, and massacres across the world where vile acts of terrorism are perpetuated against mankind simply for their religious beliefs. We note the murders of Christians in Nigeria and condemn in the strongest terms these hideous acts of genocide against humanity.”It also states that “terrorism is a gross act of cowardice on the part of the terrorist who through radical fundamentalist thinking, perform gruesome acts against humanity to instill fear, anger, hatred and intolerance.”The JPF’s Nadia Mayman de Grass said that while they mourned the loss of lives around the globe, her community should not forget their human rights which were violated.“Our human rights are being violated right here in our beautiful Bonteheuwel by unscrupulous gun-slingers who commit hideous crimes on our doorsteps. Let us remember our own friends, family, neighbours and fellow residents who have lost innocent loved ones due to gun violence,” she said.Condolences from across the globe poured in for the massacres in New Zealand, and the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community was among those who expressed their support.The national president of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, Bashir Khan, said: “It goes without saying that it was one of the darkest days in the history of New Zealand. We can only imagine what the families and friends of those who have lost their lives or those who have been injured, are going through.As a community committed to peace and rejection of all forms of extremism, we stand shoulder to shoulder with all those affected, and would like to offer our full and unconditional support to them.” Vernon Rich was also among those who were part of the human chain outside the mosque.last_img read more

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